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12 items from 2006


European Film Awards: Volver vs. Lives of Others

6 November 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Founded in 1988, the European Film Academy currently unites 1,700 European film professionals with the common aim of promoting Europe's film culture. Here are this year's noms.... European Film 2006 Breakfast On Pluto; Ireland/UK Directed by Neil Jordan Produced by Parallel Film Productions Ltd./Number 9 Films Grbavica; Austria/Bosnia-Herzegovina/Germany/Croatia Directed by Jasmila Zbanic Produced by Coop99 Filmproduktion Gmbh/Deblokada/Noirfilm/Jadran Film Das Leben Der Anderen (The Lives Of Others); Germany Directed by Florian Henckel Von Donnersmarck Produced by Wiedemann & Berg Filmproduktion/Bayerischer Rundfunk/Arte/Creado Film The Road To Guantanamo; UK Directed by Michael Winterbottom And Mat Whitecross Produced by Revolution Films Ltd. Volver; Spain Directed by Pedro Almodovar Produced by El Deseo D.A., S.L.U. The Wind That Shakes The Barley; UK/Ireland/Germany/Italy/Spain Directed By Ken Loach Produced By Sixteen Films/Matador Pictures/Regent Capital/UK Film Council/Bord Scannan Na »

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'King,' 'Queen' reign in BIFA noms

26 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

LONDON -- An eclectic mix of acting talent ranging from The Last King of Scotland co-stars Forest Whitaker and James McAvoy to veteran Peter O'Toole (Venus) find themselves in the mix for the best actor award at the ninth annual British Independent Film Awards, organizers said Wednesday.

Whitaker, O'Toole and McAvoy will take on Cillian Murphy (The Wind That Shakes the Barley) and Tony Curran (Red Road) in the race for the acting prize, one of 17 plaudits to be dished out at a Nov. 29 ceremony at London's Hammersmith Palais.

Stephen Frears' The Queen dominates the main award categories with nominations for best director, best British independent film and Helen Mirren's turn in the title role. Other films gathering multiple nominations include Last King and Shane Meadows' This Is England.

Frears will battle it out with Kevin Macdonald (Scotland), Michael Caton Jones (Shooting Dogs), Meadows (This Is England) and Ken Loach (Barley) for best director plaudits.

To secure the best British Independent film award, The Queen will have to reign over Andrea Arnold's Red Road, This Is England, Last King and Barley.

»

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‘Wind’ Shakes Up Emotions & Traditions

17 August 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Quick Links > The Wind that Shakes the Barley > Ken Loach > IFC First Take > Sweet Sixteen > Riff-Raff > Kes When Indie veteran Ken Loach steps up to the camera the industry tends to take pause. The outspoken 70 year old director has a proven track record that dates back four decades and includes five Cannes Special Jury awards and now the coveted Palme d’Or award for 2006. This year’s winning film The Wind that Shakes the Barley has reportedly just been picked up for Us distribution by IFC’s First Take program. IFC has chosen to promote the film in its controversial “day-and-date” model, with limited theatrical release to coincide with video-on-demand release in spring 2007. The film is a historical drama, written by Paul Laverty (Cargo, 2006/I) and starring Liam Cunningham, and Padraic Delaney and Cillian Murphy. The film depicts the story of Damien, a young doctor in 1920 Ireland, who »

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Murphy Defends New Movie

13 June 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Irish actor Cillian Murphy has defended controversial new movie The Wind That Shakes The Barley against criticism it is "anti-British." Director Ken Loach's epic drama about the Irish war of independence, written by Paul Laverty, has been met with derision by the UK's right-wing press, for its allegedly biased portrayal of events. But Murphy insists the film only deals with well-documented factual events, which are represented accurately and fairly. He says, "I'm sure Sinn Fein will love it, for instance, but to say that it is somehow anti-British is just plain wrong. There was an occupying force and all the atrocities they committed were well-documented by Labour party commissions. It's a complex situation, but I think Ken and Paul addressed the historical complexities." »

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Loach and Cruz Win at Cannes

29 May 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

British director Ken Loach and Spanish star Penelope Cruz were among the big winners at the climax of the Cannes Film Festival on the French Riviera on Sunday. The film-maker's drama The Wind That Shakes The Barley, which stars Cillian Murphy as an Irish medical student who joins the guerrilla war against British forces, picked up the Palme D'Or - the highest award of the festival. Accepting the trophy, Loach said, "We live in extraordinary times and that has made people political in a way they maybe weren't in the previous four, five, six years. The wars that we have seen, the occupations that we see throughout the world - people finally cannot turn away from that. It's very exciting to be able to deal with this in films, and not just be a complement to the popcorn." Cruz shared the Best Actress prize with her Volver castmates Carmen Maura, Yohana Cobo and Lola Duenas, while French Indigenes stars Jamel Debbouze, Samy Naceri and Sami Bouajila were joint winners of the Best Actor prize. In her acceptance speech, Cruz paid tribute to Volver director Pedro Almodovar, saying, "This prize really belongs to Pedro. You are the greatest, the bravest. You put so much magic into our lives. Thanks for what you do for women all over the world." Meanwhile, Mexican film-maker Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu picked up the Best Director prize for Babel, a multi-cultural film starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. The Grand Prix - the runners up prize - was awarded to French director Bruno Dumont's Flandres, while British film-maker Andrea Arnold accepted the Jury Prize - the 2nd runners up trophy - for her CCTV-inspired movie Red Road. The nine member jury was headed by Hong Kong director Wong Kar-Wai and included Samuel L. Jackson, Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth, Monica Bellucci and Ziyi Zhang. »

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Ken Loach Film Wins Palme d'Or at Cannes

28 May 2006 | IMDb News

Ken Loach's The Wind That Shakes the Barley, starring Cillian Murphy, was named the winner of the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. The drama, about the Irish struggle for independence in 1920, beat out two heavy favorites for the top prize: Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Babel, though neither of those films went away empty-handed. Inarritu won the Best Director honor for his multilayered (and multi-continental) drama, which starred Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, while Almodovar was honored with Best Screenplay. Volver also won the Best Actress award, though in an surprise move, the Cannes jury (led by director Wong Kar Wai), bestowed both acting honors on ensemble casts: the female cast of Volver (which included Penelope Cruz and Carmen Maura) and the male cast of Indigenes, Rachid Bouchareb's film about the role of North African troops in their defense of France during World War II. The Grand Prix, considered to be the runner-up prize for best film, went to French director Bruno Dumont's Flandres. Andrea Arnold's Red Road was given the Jury Prize. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff

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Press joins 'Telepathy' cast

22 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

LONDON -- Fast-rising British star Natalie Press has been cast opposite Cillian Murphy in Telepathy, producer Beyond Films said Monday. Press, who secured a London Film Critics Circle award for her portrayal of Mona in the BAFTA-winning My Summer Of Love, will star alongside Miranda Richardson and Sam Neill. The movie details the story of estranged identical twin brothers involved in a Russian space experiment and their relationship with the woman who threatens to tear them apart, played by Press. Directed by Lesley Manning, production is scheduled to begin in October. Press was attending the Festival de Cannes over the weekend for the In Competition screening of Andrea Arnold's Red Road. She is repped by Lindy King of PFD in London and Jason Weinberg of Untitled in LA. »

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The Wind That Shakes the Barley

19 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

This review was written for the festival screening of "The Wind That Shakes the Barley."

CANNES -- A Ken Loach film about the British in Ireland always has the potential for controversy, but his historical drama "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" is unlikely to inflame passions on either side.

Atmospheric but pedestrian, it is a retelling of the classic tragedy of all civil wars, from the U.S. to Vietnam to England, where brother is pitched against brother.

The film looks handsomely authentic, and the familiar characters are engaging, but the story is predictable and the Irish accents are so thick that even English subtitles are required. Loach's humanity is always in evidence, however, and the lack of histrionics will please many, so the film's conventionality could help make it accessible to general audiences.

The British in the film are nameless cardboard villains used mainly to establish just how horribly occupying forces behave. It's such a common device to make audiences root for the rebels that Loach and screenwriter Paul Laverty might have been cleverer about it. But it works, and Damien O'Sullivan (Cillian Murphy), who in 1920 is about to leave his Irish village to become a doctor in London, has his fate sealed by two incidents of British brutality that make it impossible for him to leave.

After centuries of domination, the Irish have voted for independence and so the British send in ruthless military squads, known as the Black and Tans, to intimidate the population. Mostly survivors of World War I trench fighting, the soldiers have been brutalized themselves, a point Loach allows to be made.

Damien's brother Teddy (Padraic Delaney) is a man of action, and he's devoted to the cause of Irish freedom. Led from afar by the political faction that became the Irish Republican Army, Teddy leads a group of village boys and men who call themselves a "flying column."

Training as guerilla fighters with pieces of wood shaped like rifles, the column spends most of its time trying to steal weapons. These raids bring reprisals that hit not only the rebels but also their womenfolk. Damien's sweetheart, Sinead (Orla Fitzgerald), has her hair crudely and bloodily sheared in one assault.

The story follows the group through the truce that was declared in 1921 and the Anglo-Irish Treaty signed in 1922 that created the Irish Free State out of 26 counties, with six other counties forming what became Northern Ireland remaining as part of the U.K.

As with all rulers that strive to divide the conquered, the British make sure the Irish Free State remains a part of its empire and require an oath of loyalty to the king. Those who view the treaty as a path to peace, like Teddy, don the British uniform. Those who insist that freedom will only come with complete republicanism, like Damien, continue the fight. Their tragedy becomes inevitable.

Loach provides plenty of time for arguments on all sides of the political issue, and while that is important, those scenes slow down the film badly. He stages the many action sequences with assurance, however, and draws persuasive performances from his cast.With his poet's cheekbones and blue eyes, Murphy makes a fine romantic hero, and Delaney is a match as his duty-bound brother. Liam Cunningham, too, stands out as a thoughtful train driver-turned-rebel. Contributions from cinematographer Barry Ackroyd, production designer Fergus Clegg and composer George Fenton are all first-rate.THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY

Sixteen Films, Matador Pictures, Regent Capital

Credits:

Director: Ken Loach

Screenwriter: Paul Laverty

Producer: Rebecca O'Brien

Executive producers: Ulrich Felsberg, Andrew Lowe, Nigel Thomas, Paul Trijbits

Director of photography: Barry Ackroyd

Production designer: Fergus Clegg

Editor: Jonathan Morris

Composer: George Fenton

Cast:

Damien: Cillian Murphy

Teddy: Padraic Delaney

Dan: Liam Cunningham

Sinead: Orla Fitzgerald

Peggy: Mary Riordan

Bernadette: Mary Murphy

Micheail: Laurence Barry

Finbar: Damien Kearney

Leo: Frank Bourke

Rory: Myles Horgan

Chris: John Crean

Sir John Hamilton: Roger Allam

Priest: Denis Conway »

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The Wind That Shakes the Barley

19 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

CANNES -- A Ken Loach film about the British in Ireland always has the potential for controversy, but his historical drama The Wind That Shakes the Barley is unlikely to inflame passions on either side.

Atmospheric but pedestrian, it is a retelling of the classic tragedy of all civil wars, from the U.S. to Vietnam to England, where brother is pitched against brother.

The film looks handsomely authentic, and the familiar characters are engaging, but the story is predictable and the Irish accents are so thick that even English subtitles are required. Loach's humanity is always in evidence, however, and the lack of histrionics will please many, so the film's conventionality could help make it accessible to general audiences.

The British in the film are nameless cardboard villains used mainly to establish just how horribly occupying forces behave. It's such a common device to make audiences root for the rebels that Loach and screenwriter Paul Laverty might have been cleverer about it. But it works, and Damien O'Sullivan (Cillian Murphy), who in 1920 is about to leave his Irish village to become a doctor in London, has his fate sealed by two incidents of British brutality that make it impossible for him to leave.

After centuries of domination, the Irish have voted for independence and so the British send in ruthless military squads, known as the Black and Tans, to intimidate the population. Mostly survivors of World War I trench fighting, the soldiers have been brutalized themselves, a point Loach allows to be made.

Damien's brother Teddy (Padraic Delaney) is a man of action, and he's devoted to the cause of Irish freedom. Led from afar by the political faction that became the Irish Republican Army, Teddy leads a group of village boys and men who call themselves a "flying column."

Training as guerilla fighters with pieces of wood shaped like rifles, the column spends most of its time trying to steal weapons. These raids bring reprisals that hit not only the rebels but also their womenfolk. Damien's sweetheart, Sinead (Orla Fitzgerald), has her hair crudely and bloodily sheared in one assault.

The story follows the group through the truce that was declared in 1921 and the Anglo-Irish Treaty signed in 1922 that created the Irish Free State out of 26 counties, with six other counties forming what became Northern Ireland remaining as part of the U.K.

As with all rulers that strive to divide the conquered, the British make sure the Irish Free State remains a part of its empire and require an oath of loyalty to the king. Those who view the treaty as a path to peace, like Teddy, don the British uniform. Those who insist that freedom will only come with complete republicanism, like Damien, continue the fight. Their tragedy becomes inevitable.

Loach provides plenty of time for arguments on all sides of the political issue, and while that is important, those scenes slow down the film badly. He stages the many action sequences with assurance, however, and draws persuasive performances from his cast.

With his poet's cheekbones and blue eyes, Murphy makes a fine romantic hero, and Delaney is a match as his duty-bound brother. Liam Cunningham, too, stands out as a thoughtful train driver-turned-rebel. Contributions from cinematographer Barry Ackroyd, production designer Fergus Clegg and composer George Fenton are all first-rate.

THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY

Sixteen Films, Matador Pictures, Regent Capital

Credits:

Director: Ken Loach

Screenwriter: Paul Laverty

Producer: Rebecca O'Brien

Executive producers: Ulrich Felsberg, Andrew Lowe, Nigel Thomas, Paul Trijbits

Director of photography: Barry Ackroyd

Production designer: Fergus Clegg

Editor: Jonathan Morris

Composer: George Fenton

Cast:

Damien: Cillian Murphy

Teddy: Padraic Delaney

Dan: Liam Cunningham

Sinead: Orla Fitzgerald

Peggy: Mary Riordan

Bernadette: Mary Murphy

Micheail: Laurence Barry

Finbar: Damien Kearney

Leo: Frank Bourke

Rory: Myles Horgan

Chris: John Crean

Sir John Hamilton: Roger Allam

Priest: Denis Conway »

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'Wedding Crashers' and 'Virgin' Land Five MTV Nominations

25 April 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Zany comedies Wedding Crashers and The 40-Year-Old Virgin have topped this year's MTV Movie Awards nominations with five gongs apiece. The two films will compete with King Kong, Sin City and Batman Begins for the Best Movie Prize, while Virgin's Steve Carell will fight for the Best Performance honor with Jake Gyllenhaal, Joaquin Phoenix, Reese Witherspoon, Rachel McAdams and Terrence Howard. Batman Begins' Christian Bale, Jessica Alba (Sin City), Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter & The Goblet Of Fire), Kate Beckinsale (Underworld: Evolution) and Ewan McGregor (Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith) will fight it out for the Best Hero prize while the Best Villains race is between Harry Potter bad guy Ralph Fiennes, Darth Vader Hayden Christensen and Batman foe Cillian Murphy, among others. In other categories, Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo star Rob Schneider will compete with Beyonce Knowles (The Pink Panther), Alba, and Jessica Simpson (Dukes Of Hazzard) for the Sexiest Performance honor. And parents-to-be Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt are favorites to claim the Best Fight for their rumble in Mr. and Mrs. Smith. The 2006 MTV Movie Awards will air on June 8. »

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L.A.'s Irish community goes 'Wilde' for writers

4 March 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

A host of Irish and Irish-American industry toppers turned out in Los Angeles for the inaugural edition of the Oscar Wilde: Honoring Irish Writing in Film awards hosted by the U.S.-Ireland Alliance. Iish helmers Jim Sheridan and Neil Jordan and composer David Holmes were honored at Thursday's event at the Ebell Theater complex. The gathering is designed to "honor the craft of writing and expand the existing ties between the entertainment industries in the U.S. and Ireland, particularly film production, gaming, music and animation," said Trina Vargo, president of the U.S.-Ireland Alliance in introducing the honorees. Actors Adrian Dunbar, Jodie Foster Anjelica Huston, Cillian Murphy, Fionnuala Flanagan, Daryl Hannah, Dennis Hopper, Rachel Griffiths and Martin McDonagh were among the guests. »

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Burman's 'Embrace' leads eclectic sidebar at Berlin

9 January 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

COLOGNE, Germany -- Daniel Burman, the Argentine director who won two Silver Bears at Berlin in 2004 with his social-realist comedy "Lost Embrace", is returning to the festival to open this year's Panorama section with "Family Law". The family comedy-drama stars "Lost Embrace" leads Daniel Hendler and Adriana Aizenberg. The lineup for Berlin's Panorama sidebar, announced Monday, was typically eclectic. Stand-out titles include Neil Jordan's "Breakfast On Pluto", featuring Cillian Murphy as a cross-dresser in the midst of the Irish "troubles"; John Hillcoat's dark Australian Western "The Proposition", starring Guy Pearce, Emily Watson and Ray Winstone; and "Stay", the Ewan McGregor-Ryan Gosling thriller directed by German-born Marc Forster. German up-and-comers are represented with three titles: the media satire "Bye Bye Berlusconi" from Jan Henrik Stahlberg, Vanessa Jopp's improvisational drama "Happy As One" and Andres Veiel's "The Kick". »

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12 items from 2006


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