Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 87 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

Permalink | Report a problem


Rare Cannes Swedish Favorite, AIDS Drama and Best Actor Winner Phoenix Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 7:16 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' with Claes Bang: 'Gobsmackingly weird' Cannes Film Festival favorite may have a tough time landing a Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award nomination. Ruben Östlund's comedy-drama is totally unrelated to Jehane Noujaim's 2013 Oscar-nominated political documentary of the same title, which refers to downtown Cairo's Tahrir Square. Cannes' Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' & other Official Competition favorites' Oscar chances Screenwriter-director Ruben Östlund's The Square was the Palme d'Or winner at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, which wrapped up on May 28. (See list of Palme d'Or and other 2017 Cannes winners further below.) Clocking in at about 2 hours and 20 minutes, Östlund's unusual comedy-drama revolving around the chaotic p.r. campaign to promote the opening of the titular installation – a symbolic square of light – at a contemporary art museum in Stockholm has been generally well-received by critics. In the opinion of The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw, »

- Steph Mont.

Permalink | Report a problem


'The Chinese Widow' to replace 'Our Time Will Come' as Siff opener

12 June 2017 8:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

No reason has been given for the change in opening film.

Danish director Bille August’s The Chinese Widow will open this year’s Shanghai International Film Festival (Siff, June 17-26), replacing Ann Hui’s Our Time Will Come, which was previously announced as the opening film.

However, Our Time Will Come will still play in the Golden Goblet competition at Siff. No reason was given for the change by either the festival or the film’s producer Bona Film Group.

Both films are set in China during the Second World War. Starring Emile Hirsch and Yu Nan, The Chinese Widow tells the story of an American pilot who is shot down and saved by Chinese villagers. It remains unclear if the film has been made under the recently signed Danish-Chinese co-production treaty. August recently served as jury president at the Beijing International Film Festival.

Our Time Will Come, which stars Zhou Xun and Eddie Peng, revolves »

- lizshackleton@gmail.com (Liz Shackleton)

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

29 May 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

The heightened security with machine gun armed soldiers and policemen constantly patrolling was intensified after the Manchester Massacre. With a pall over the festival, one minute of silence was observed for the 22 murdered and flags hung at half-mast. In addition to that, the sudden death at 57 of the Busan Film Festival deputy director Kim Ji-seok and that of the James Bond star Roger Moore brought the film world into a new perspective as we join the larger world to face the random indications of human mortality. High security vs. cinema as a sanctuary of freedom is highlighted this year like no other time that I can recall in my 31 years here.President of the jury, Pedro Almodovar

But life does go on, the jury judges, the stars get press attention on the red carpet and the rest of us continue to wait patiently in »

- Sydney Levine

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

28 May 2017 10:25 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure, »

- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: Insas Student Valentina Maurel’s ‘Paul Is Here’ Wins Cannes Cinefondation

26 May 2017 12:41 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — “Paul Is Here,” from Costa Rica’s Valentina Maurel, a student at Belgium’s Institut National Supérieur des Arts du Spectacle et des Techniques de Diffusion (Insas), snagged the First Jury Prize Friday at Cannes Cinefondation on Friday.

Crucially, the First Jury Prize guarantees Maurel presentation of her first feature at the Cannes Festival – a large leg-up when it comes to getting that film made.

The prize was awarded by a jury headed by Romanian 2007 Cannes Palme d’Or winner Cristian Mungiu (“4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days”). Also on the jury: French actress Clotilde Hesme (“Chocolat”), Greek director Athina Rachel Tsangari (“Chevalier”), “Moonlight’s” Barry Jenkins and pioneering Singaporean helmer Eric Khoo (“In the Room”).

“A study of a relationship in crisis, which has complications, which I hope will touch spectators,” Maurel said. her short turns on a girl whose life is turned upside down by the return of Paul. an old flame, »

- John Hopewell

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2017 Cinéfondation winners revealed

26 May 2017 9:20 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Cristian Mungiu lead the jury at the 70th edition of the festival.

The winners of the 20th Cinéfondation Selection at the Cannes Film Festival have been announced.

The Cinéfondation Selection consisted of 16 student films, chosen out of 2 600 entries coming from 626 film schools around the world.

Romanian director Cristian Mungiu was president of the Jury that also included Clotilde Hesme, Athina Rachel Tsangari, Barry Jenkins and Eric Khoo.

They handed out the prizes during a ceremony held in the Buñuel Theatre, followed by the screening of the winning films, which were:

First Prize:

Paul Est LÀ (Paul Is Here)

Directed by Valentina Maurel

Insas, Belgium

Second Prize:

Heyvan (AniMal)

Directed by Bahram & Bahman Ark

Iranian National School of Cinema, Iran

Third Prize:

Deux ÉGARÉS Sont Morts (Two Youths Died)

Directed by Tommaso Usberti

La Fémis, France

The Cinéfondation allocates a €15,000 grant for the First Prize, €11,250 for the Second and €7,500 for the Third.

The winner »

- orlando.parfitt@screendaily.com (Orlando Parfitt)

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Award Winners Announced in Cinéfondation Selection of Student Films

26 May 2017 9:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Cannes Critics Week Awards: ‘Makala,’ ‘Gabriel and the Mountain’ Take Top Honors

The Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury headed by Cristian Mungiu and including Clotilde Hesme, Athina Rachel Tsangari, Barry Jenkins and Eric Khoo has awarded the 2017 Cinéfondation Prizes during a ceremony held in the Buñuel Theatre, followed by the screening of the winning films. The winners are:

First Prize

“Paul Est Là” (“Paul Is Here”)

Directed by Valentina Maurel

The Institut National Supérieur des Arts du Spectacle (Insas), Belgium

Second Prize

“Heyvan” (“Animal”)

Directed by Bahram Ark and Bahman Ark

Iranian National School of Cinema, Iran

Third Prize

Deux Égarés Sont Morts” (“Two Youths Died”)

Directed by Tommaso Usberti

La Fémis, France

The Cinéfondation allocates a €15,000 grant for the first prize, €11,250 for the second and €7,500 for the third. The winner of the first prize is also guaranteed the presentation of his or her first feature film at the Cannes Film Festival. »

- Graham Winfrey

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Film Review: ‘Oh Lucy!’

22 May 2017 10:26 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Try to picture a Japanese remake of “Hello, My Name Is Doris,” shot through with an undertow of quiet desperation that wouldn’t be out of place in a Cristian Mungiu film, and you’re halfway toward grasping the strange appeal of director Atsuko Hirayanagi’s feature debut, “Oh Lucy!” Like a chocolate trifle with an arsenic core, this quirky portrait of a lonely Tokyo woman who follows her English teacher to California offers a skewed take on American indie tropes, effectively gesturing toward broad comic appeal while offering peeks at a profound darkness just beneath. Expanded from her award-winning short of the same title, “Oh Lucy!” betrays some rough edges in the transition, but Hirayanagi’s idiosyncratic touch marks her as a talent worth tracking.

Set in some of the least picturesque corners of Tokyo, “Oh Lucy!” is a character study about a character rarely seen on film: a quietly miserable, »

- Andrew Barker

Permalink | Report a problem


80 top film-makers sound alarm over EU copyright rules

22 May 2017 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors »

Permalink | Report a problem


80 top film-makers demand changes to EU copyright rules

22 May 2017 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Our Time Will Come' to open Shanghai film festival

19 May 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Historical drama is one of eight titles announced for Siff’s Golden Goblets competition.

Ann Hui’s Our Time Will Come will open this year’s Shanghai International Film Festival (Siff, June 17-26), which is celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2017.

The historical drama, starring Eddie Peng and Zhou Xun, will also compete in the festival’s main competition section, the Golden Goblet Awards.

At a Cannes reception yesterday (May 18), Siff also announced seven other competition titles: Yasuo Furuhat’s Reminiscence (Japan), Dave McCary’s Brigsby Bear (Us), Cătălin Saizescu’s Fault Condition (Romania), Maciej Pieprzyca’s I’m A Killer (Poland), Ivan Bolotnikov’s Kharms (Russia), Robert Mullan’s Mad To Be Normal (UK) and Markus Goller’s My Brother Simple (Germany).

As previously announced, Romanian director Christian Mungiu will head the Golden Goblet Awards jury, which also includes Chinese director Cao Baoping, Chinese screenwriter Li Qiang, Us/Macedonian filmmaker Milcho Manchevski, Japanese director »

- lizshackleton@gmail.com (Liz Shackleton)

Permalink | Report a problem


The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

17 May 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Official Lineup Announcements

2017 Cannes Film Festival Announces Lineup: Todd Haynes, Sofia Coppola, ‘Twin Peaks’ and More

2017 Cannes Film Festival Announces Short Film Lineup

Cannes 2017 Unveils Official Schedule, Adds Masterclasses With Clint Eastwood and Alfonso Cuarón

Cannes 2017 Announces Directors Fortnight Lineup, Including Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ and ‘Patti Cake$’

Cannes Classics 2017 Lineup Includes ‘Belle de Jour’ Restoration, Stanley Kubrick Doc and More

2017 Cannes Critics’ Week Announces Lineup, Including ‘Brigsby Bear’ and Animation From Iran

Cannes Adds Roman Polanski Film to Lineup

Cannes Doc Day to Explore ‘Fake News,’ Women’s Voices and New Work From Amos Gitaï

Cannes American Pavilion 2017 Lineup: Spike Lee, Wim Wenders, Screen Talk Live and More

Pre-Festival Announcements and News

Cannes 2017: Pedro Almodóvar Is Jury President

Cannes: Barry Jenkins, Cristian Mungiu and More Are Set for Jury Duty

Cannes Addresses Netflix Controversy By Forcing Competition Films to Receive Theatrical Distribution In France

Todd Haynes »

- Indiewire Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2017: 9 Hot Acquisition Titles That Will Have Buyers Chasing Foreign Films

16 May 2017 12:04 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If you’re a buyer, the Cannes Film Festival isn’t where you go to catch a break. Including festival sidebars like Critics’ Week and Director’s Fortnight, there are more than 75 films at Cannes from all over the world — but when it comes to English-language movies, most are already spoken for.

Read More: The Cannes Film Festival Buyers Guide: Who’s Buying the Movies You’ll Watch

Netflix took the rights to Noah Baumbach’s family drama “The Meyerowitz Stories,” while Amazon has both Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” and Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled.” A24 has never bought a completed film at Cannes, but the company is launching four titles at the fest, including Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and the Safdie brothers’ “Good Time.”

What’s left are mainly foreign-language films from some of the most respected indie auteurs in world. Most of these filmmakers are »

- Graham Winfrey

Permalink | Report a problem


Barry Jenkins and Adele Romanski’s Pastel Inks Two-Year Production Deal with Megan Ellison’s Annapurna

16 May 2017 9:18 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Megan Ellison’s Annapurna is getting into the Barry Jenkins business.

The production company has just signed a two-year film production deal with Pastel, Jenkins’ own shingle, which aims to be “a home that empowers artists to create provocative, boundary-pushing work in film, television and beyond.” The deal includes a new feature project, set to be helmed by Jenkins, along with future films from Pastel’s four partners, including Jenkins, his “Moonlight” producer Adele Romanski, Sara Murphy, and Mark Ceryak.

The new deal comes months after Pastel’s big Best Picture win for Jenkins’ “Moonlight” — the company’s very first film — which was produced by Romanski and Plan B.

Read More: ‘Moonlight’ Postmortem: How To Win Best Picture in 5 (Not So) Easy Steps

Jenkins is currently writing a script, which is slated to serve as the first project under the deal. Details on that project are being kept under wraps. »

- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


The Cannes Film Festival Buyers Guide: Who’s Buying the Movies You’ll Watch

15 May 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Buyers return to Cannes like swallows to the Capistranos, but this year they’ll find a hostile landscape. Too many buyers, too few titles, and streaming-service disruptors are driving up prices all the while, making North American prebuys increasingly necessary.

That’s hazardous terrain: Witness the Weinstein Company’s $6 million bid for transgender drama “3 Generations” (aka “After Ray”). Two years later, after a title change and poor reviews on and off the festival circuit, the drama starring Elle Fanning and Susan Sarandon finally received a May 5 release. Total domestic gross to date: $46,421.

That was in 2015, the last year that TWC held its then-annual dog-and-pony show for buyers and press at the Majestic Hotel. This year, like the last, they’ll hold court on their yacht, which also serves as their offices — still tony, but on a budget; it’s a lot less expensive than that prime Croissette real estate. Meanwhile, »

- Anne Thompson and Graham Winfrey

Permalink | Report a problem


The Cannes Film Festival Buyers Guide: Who’s Buying the Movies You’ll Watch

15 May 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Buyers return to Cannes like swallows to the Capistranos, but this year they’ll find a hostile landscape. Too many buyers, too few titles, and streaming-service disruptors are driving up prices all the while, making North American prebuys increasingly necessary.

That’s hazardous terrain: Witness the Weinstein Company’s $6 million bid for transgender drama “3 Generations” (aka “After Ray”). Two years later, after a title change and poor reviews on and off the festival circuit, the drama starring Elle Fanning and Susan Sarandon finally received a May 5 release. Total domestic gross to date: $46,421.

That was in 2015, the last year that TWC held its then-annual dog-and-pony show for buyers and press at the Majestic Hotel. This year, like the last, they’ll hold court on their yacht, which also serves as their offices — still tony, but on a budget; it’s a lot less expensive than that prime Croissette real estate. Meanwhile, »

- Anne Thompson and Graham Winfrey

Permalink | Report a problem


Ben Kingsley to Star in First of Daniel Alfredson’s Adaptation of ‘Intrigo’ Novel Trilogy

15 May 2017 10:12 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ben Kingsley is set to star in “Death of an Author,” the first adaptation of the upcoming  planned “Intrigo” trilogy of novels by international best-selling Swedish author Hakan Nesser. Benno Fürmann (“North Face”) and Tuva Novotny (“Jalla, Jalla”) will co-star alongside Kingsley in the first of three films that will be helmed by “The Girl Who Played with Fire” director Daniel Alfredson.

The titles of the three films will be “Death of an Author,” “Samaria” and “Dear Agnes.” They will be set in an undefined country somewhere in northern Europe, where many of Nesser’s stories have been set. The three films will share the same psychology and narrative structure, with plots that include some sort of escape with dark hidden secrets destined to surface, as well as guilt, revenge and atonement.

Read More: ‘War Machine’ Trailer: Brad Pitt’s Ready to Win in Afghanistan in New Netflix Satirical Comedy »

- Yoselin Acevedo

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Day After’ Trailer and Photos: Hong Sang-soo Remains as Prolific as Ever With Latest Cannes Drama

14 May 2017 1:46 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ever prolific, Hong Sang-soo is back at Cannes with two different films this year. “The Day After” is premiering in Competition, while “Claire’s Camera” is set to make its bow Out of Competition. As you wait for similar materials from the latter to surface, avail yourself of the trailer, poster and photos from the former below.

Read More: ‘The Day After’ First Trailer: Hong Sang-soo Tells Another Tale of a Love Affair in Cannes Drama

Here’s the synopsis: “It is Areum’s first day of work at a small publisher. Her boss Bongwan loved and recently broke up with the woman who previously worked there. Today too, the married Bongwan leaves home in the dark morning and sets off to work. The memories of the woman who left weigh down on him. That day Bongwan’s wife finds a love note, bursts into the office, and mistakes Areum for the woman who left. »

- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Barbara’ Trailer: Mathieu Amalric’s Female-Centric Drama Premieres at Cannes This Month — Watch

14 May 2017 1:04 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Mathieu Amalric is returning to Cannes this month, and not just as an actor. In addition to appearing in frequent collaborator Arnaud Desplechin’s “Ismael’s Ghosts,” Amalric will also be in the Un Certain Regard category with his latest directorial effort. Avail yourself of the trailer and new photos for “Barbara” below (via the Playlist).

Read More: Watch: U.S. Trailer For Arnaud Desplechin’s ‘My Golden Days’ Starring Mathieu Amalric

Here’s the synopsis: “An actress, Brigitte, is playing Barbara in a film that soon begins shooting. Brigitte works on her character, her voice, the songs and scores, the imitation of her gestures, her knitting, the lines to learn. Things move along. The character grows inside her. Invades her, even … Yves, the director, is also working — via encounters, archival footage, the music. He seems inhabited and inspired by her … But by whom? The actress or Barbara?”

Read More: »

- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 87 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners