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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

11 items from 2014


Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

24 June 2014 10:07 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

24 June 2014 10:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, »

- Carmel Dagan

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TV Review: ‘Gomorrah’

28 May 2014 8:59 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Already sold in some 50 territories including the U.S., courtesy of the Weinstein Co., the Italian series “Gomorrah” represents a promising attempt to break into the crowded quality-tv market that, if backed by an intelligent distribution strategy, could receive wide international exposure — a first for Italian television. Two years in the making, this serial adaptation of Roberto Saviano’s bestselling investigation into the Neapolitan mob covers different chapters from those seen in Matteo Garrone’s acclaimed 2008 bigscreen version. The enduring (if stereotyped) romance between international audiences and the fictional Italian mob will boost the skein’s reception abroad, although “Gomorrah” will also serve to dispel a myth or two still surrounding the onscreen depiction of organized crime.

The series’ first season follows Ciro (Marco D’Amore), the up-and-coming right hand of the Savastano family boss, Pietro (Fortunato Cerlino), and his bovine son, Genny (Salvatore Esposito). Rival clans fight for control of the marketplace, »

- Giovanni Vimercati

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Highlights From the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival

14 April 2014 10:58 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The Turner Classic Movies (TCM) Film Festival wrapped up its 5th annual hoorah in Hollywood on Sunday and this year was chock full of joyful and exciting films and special guests. There were so many wonderful old movies that most people have seen, but for me the true thrill was the chance to see a beloved movie on the big screen, the way it was intended.

Throw in some amazing guests and it was absolute gold.

Walt Disney’s The Jungle Book (1967)

Screened at the beautiful El Capitan Theater, The Jungle Book was the last Disney animated feature that was overseen by Walt Disney himself. After the success of Mary Poppins and other Disney hits such as The Parent Trap, The Absent Minded Professor and The Sword in the Stone, Disney went back to the well and asked songwriters Bobby and Richard Sherman to take a swing at its animated »

- Melissa Thompson

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Defending the '12 Worst Muppets Ever'

21 March 2014 12:10 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The folks at io9 drew up a list of the 12 worst Muppets. It should disturb and haunt you, but not because the list is correct: It berates quirky and forgotten Muppets when their weirdness often represents more than what meets the eye. Surely there are annoying Muppet qualities, but that's the joy of the Muppets: They are annoying. To condemn their grating qualities is to misunderstand what makes them cool and even defiant. Tina Fey shakes her head in contempt. So without further ado, I'm defending the 12 "Least Wanted" Muppets. I'm already so flustered and squawky that you'd think I was voiced by Frank Oz.  1. Pepe the Prawn Latin stereotypes abounding? Perhaps. But Pepe the Prawn's exasperated, self-conscious behavior is more reminiscent of the wonderful Telly Monster than anyone else. You don't hate Telly, do you? Wow. Maybe you hate Telly. And are you telling me you can resist that frantic, »

- Louis Virtel

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Mindy Newell: Yiddishkeit

17 March 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

I miss bookstores.  Being able to walk up and down the aisles, pulling out a title that sounds intriguing, perusing the dust jacket flap, sometimes sitting down on the floor and reading the first couple of pages…just killing a couple of hours lost in a bibliophile’s heaven.

Okay, bookstores aren’t entirely gone, but they are, as everyone knows, on the endangered list.  My own first hint of this came about 15 years ago when the Borders in the Short Hills Mall closed up.  It was astonishing—this was a bookstore that was always mobbed, no matter the time of day.  Many, many people objected to the closing, and many, many people let the mall’s management know it; the customer service desk clerk told me, as I filled out the complaint form, that there were over 3,000 signatures in the first week alone protesting the shutdown, and demanding, if not the return of Borders, »

- Mindy Newell

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See This/Skip That: From The Grand Budapest Hotel to Mr. Peabody & Sherman

7 March 2014 12:35 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Rise of an Empire is a fine sequel to 300, but People's critic says you should check into The Grand Budapest Hotel instead. Here's what to see and what to skip in theaters this weekend. See thisThe Grand Budapest HotelWhimsy gets such a crappy rap. Granted, too many directors use it poorly, spraying their sketchily plotted, inartfully written films with cinematic chintz. But Wes Anderson is of an entirely different vintage. He uses massive amounts of whimsy - more than just about anyone else - but the difference is that he knows just how. Take The Grand Budapest Hotel, for instance. »

- Alynda Wheat, PEOPLE Movie Critic

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The Grand Budapest Hotel review – Wes Anderson's new film is a 'deeply pleasurable immersion' | Peter Bradshaw

6 March 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Anderson's staggeringly realised hotel of secret passion is an exhilarating and intelligent drama

This delirious operetta-farce is an eerily detailed and very funny work from the savant virtuoso of American indie cinema, Wes Anderson. It is set in the fading grandeur of a preposterous luxury hotel in an equally preposterous pre-war central European country, the fictional Zubrowka. This kind of milieu – the hotel spa or sanatorium occupied by mysterious invalids, chancers or impoverished White Russians – was loved by Thomas Mann and Vladimir Nabokov, but the closing credits reveal that the director has been specifically inspired by Stefan Zweig, author of Beware of Pity and The Post Office Girl. In fact, the movie's moustachioed star Ralph Fiennes does rather resemble Zweig.

Stefan Zweig, never entirely happy with movie adaptations of his work, might however have been baffled by this personal homage, just as Roald Dahl might have been by Wes Anderson's Fantastic Mr Fox. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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The Definitive Original Screenplays: 40-31

23 February 2014 9:48 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

As we continue to move forward through the list, let us consider: how do you define an original screenplay? In theory, everything is based on something. Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine is basically a modern A Streetcar Named Desire. But, somehow, Jasmine is classified as an original screenplay. When a film is wholly original, nothing like it had been done before, and others have tried to copy it since. Plenty of original screenplays (some in this list) take on tired genres, but flip the script. But the ones that really catch the audience by surprise are the ones that feel imaginative, creative, and different.

40. Spirited Away (2001)

Written by Hayao Miyazaki

That’s a good start! Once you’ve met someone, you never really forget them. It just takes a while for your memories to return.

No writer/director on this list may be more fantastical than the great Hayao Miyazaki, »

- Joshua Gaul

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Helix episode 7 review: Survivor Zero

17 February 2014 1:42 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Review Billy Grifter 17 Feb 2014 - 09:39

Billy is still struggling to take Helix seriously. Here's his review of this week's episode...

This review contains spoilers.

1.7 Survivor Zero

A cynic might say that you can always tell when a show has lost its way… Jeri Ryan shows up.

I’ve been watching Helix with increasing incredulity. It's as if the writers sat around at the script meetings and agreed that characters with almost no backstory or real personalities would become endearing when placed in very obviously contrived peril.

The most contrived aspect of the whole show is the lack of communications with the outside world, that’s now reached new levels of farce with the arrival of Jeri Ryan’s character, Constance Sutton. She tells them that she’s not brought her own communications with her, and that her helicopters will be back in a few days. Right, so presumably back at Cdc, »

- louisamellor

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Beatles Guru -- Taxman Was Right ... Michael Jackson Collection Worth a Fortune!

9 February 2014 7:20 AM, PST | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

The Michael Jackson Estate is insane for trying to value Mj's Beatles collection at Zero for tax purposes ... so says one of the most prominent Beatles experts in the world ... who also happens to be a tax attorney.The Estate is in a dogfight with the IRS ... which claims MJs people stiffed the government on more than a half a Billion dollars in taxes by undervaluing assets ... including MJs interest in songs by Mj and the Beatles. »

- TMZ Staff

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

11 items from 2014


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