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Bill Moseley Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (3) | Trivia (11) | Personal Quotes (8)

Overview (3)

Born in Stamford, Connecticut, USA
Birth NameWilliam Moseley
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

William "Bill" Moseley (born November 11, 1951) is an American film actor and musician who has starred in a number of cult classic horror films, including House of 1000 Corpses (2003), Repo! The Genetic Opera (2008) and The Devil's Rejects (2005). His first big role was in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) as Chop Top. On the HBO TV series Carnivàle (2003), Moseley had a recurring role as camp cook Possum. He has also released records with guitarist Buckethead in the band Cornbugs, as well as featuring on the guitarist's solo work.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Movie Guy

Spouse (1)

Lucinda Jenney (14 February 2017 - present) (1 child)

Trade Mark (3)

Bright, blue eyes
His characters often rant while committing acts of violence
Often plays sadistic yet darkly comedic villains (Chop-Top in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986), Otis in House of 1000 Corpses (2003)/The Devil's Rejects (2005))

Trivia (11)

Father, with Lucinda Jenney, of actress Marion Moseley.
Has a band with Guns N' Roses guitar player Buckethead called "Cornbugs."
Got the part of Chop Top in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) based on a cameo he did in a short film called The Texas Chainsaw Manicure.
Has two daughters.
Has been in six movies with Tom Towles (Night of the Living Dead (1990), House of 1000 Corpses (2003), Home Sick (2007), The Devil's Rejects (2005) Grindhouse (2007), and Halloween (2007)).
Was once a journalist, writing for such magazines as Omni, National Lampoon and Psychology Today.
Was friends with Timothy Leary.
Graduated from Yale University.
Reprised Chop Top, his character in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986), in a film that was never released called "All American Massacre (2000)," which featured music from Buckethead.
Was considered for the role of Captain James Deakins on Law & Order: Criminal Intent (2001).
He is left-handed.

Personal Quotes (8)

[advice to actors wanting to be in the horror industry] First and foremost, enjoy yourself! And get paid! Get paid is my advice to actors in general. Re: the horror industry, if you're attracted to it because you really want to saw someone in half, seek psychiatric help. The horror fans, and my horror peers, have, for the most part, a very clear sense of what's real and what's fantasy. A good scare is a wonderful thing. Horror movies can make for a great date. Just make sure the blood that flows is Karo syrup and not hemoglobin!
One of the things I've learned from writing is to exercise that imagination muscle on a daily basis. As an actor, when I get a script and things are worked out to where I'm going to do the project, what I like to do is read the script three or four times and just let my imagination go. I just try to figure out how my character can make real choices in his natural environment. It seems to have worked out.
One day on the set of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986), as I was hanging out in full Chop-Top between scenes, I noticed a well-heeled woman with a little boy. The boy saw me and clung tightly to his mother's leg. She patted him on the head and said, "Don't worry, Johnny, he's not real; he's just an actor wearing make-up". I approached mother and son, smiling, leaned down and whispered in the boy's little ear: "Don't believe it".
I love horror movies, always have. First one I ever saw in the theater was the original The Blob (1958) with Steve McQueen. Second was a double bill - The Fly (1958) and Return of the Fly (1959). Scared the crap out of me. Been a fan ever since.
As a college student, I never thought in my wildest dreams that acting could be my career! I come from Midwest stock, railroad people, and the idea of pursuing an acting career was akin to running off to join the circus. It wasn't until I landed the part of Chop-Top in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) in 1986, twelve years after I'd graduated from Yale, that it occurred to me that you could actually make a living - and a pretty good one! - at this acting thing. 2014 marks my 30th anniversary as a card-carrying Screen Actors Guild (SAG) member. I've got health benefits for me and my family, a decent pension, and I'm still working. Go figure!
[on House of 1000 Corpses (2003)] It's a bloody, violent movie, a throwback to the golden age of '70s horror when the teens weren't the stars - they were the rib roasts!
I look at acting like a treasure hunt, and the treasure is the truth of the character - finding out who they really are.
If there is a common thread in my demented characters, it's that they're all happy in their work. As an actor, my personal joy in playing these crazy kooks shows through - it's fun! Also, I learned early on that no matter how insane a character might be, you have to play him as if you think you're the only sane one in the room! I love my monsters, love playing them, what they've taught me. I gotta say, I sleep soundly, and I'm mostly not afraid of the dark.

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