Paul Morrissey (I) - News Poster

News

Tobe Hooper’s Box-Office Struggles: How Shaky Returns Undercut A Visionary Director

  • Indiewire
Tobe Hooper’s Box-Office Struggles: How Shaky Returns Undercut A Visionary Director
Tobe Hooper, who died over the weekend at 74, was a leader in the Vietnam-era boom in independent, ultra-violent horror films. His 1974 “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” is considered the last in a trio of low-budget horror breakouts that included George Romero’s 1968 “Night of the Living Dead” and Wes Craven’s 1972 “Last House on the Left.”

Though grosses for these films were unreliably reported, “Texas” appears to have done the best. Its reported $30 million domestic take (adjusted, around $140 million today) was at least 100 times its budget (also a guess, though some reports have it as high as $300,000 in 1974 value). Producers recouped costs and little else from distributor Bryanston (best known for the Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey’s “Frankenstein” and “Dracula” movies, as well as taking over distribution of “Deep Throat”).

Like Romero and Craven, the hit boosted Hooper’s career. But unlike his peers, Hooper struggled to establish his brand after “Texas.
See full article at Indiewire »

Content Media Boards ‘Bees Make Honey’ for Worldwide Sales

Content Media Boards ‘Bees Make Honey’ for Worldwide Sales
Content Media was acquired worldwide sales rights to British murder mystery comedy “Bees Make Honey,” the company said Wednesday. The film, which stars Alice Eve, is set to make its world premiere at the Raindance Film Festival in London on Sept. 23. Content will introduce the film to buyers in Toronto next month.

The sophomore feature of Eve’s younger brother Jack Eve, who wrote, directed and produced the film, “Bees Make Honey” is set in England in 1934. It sees Alice Eve’s high-society widow, hosting her annual Halloween costume party for her friends, secretly employ a police inspector to solve the crime of the murder of her husband that took place at the same event one year earlier.

“Jack has taken a traditional whodunit format, infused it with a Baz Luhrmann-like energy, and combined it with a wonderful old school British comedy,” said Jamie Carmichael, president of film at Content.

Bees Make Honey
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Todd Haynes to Direct Documentary on The Velvet Underground

Coming off the heels of the Cannes premiere of his new film Wonderstruck, which will be shown as the Centerpiece selection of this year’s New York Film Festival, Todd Haynes has announced that his next project will be a documentary on the legendary rock band The Velvet Underground. As reported on by Variety, Haynes, for which this will be his first documentary, is seeking to create a visual experience that will “rely certainly on [Andy] Warhol films but also a rich culture of experimental film, a vernacular we have lost and we don’t have, [and that] we increasingly get further removed from,” in addition to interviews with the surviving members of the band and other contemporaries.

In addition, the article mentions an Amazon limited TV series that the director is developing which is said to be about a currently unidentified, immensely influential and radical public figure.

Haynes, who is in Locarno
See full article at The Film Stage »

Andy Warhol’s Legendary Screen Tests, Including Bob Dylan and Edie Sedgwick, Find Temporary New Venue

  • Indiewire
Andy Warhol’s Legendary Screen Tests, Including Bob Dylan and Edie Sedgwick, Find Temporary New Venue
“In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes,” Andy Warhol famously said, but the legendary artist probably didn’t expect that such a sentiment would apply to his own screen tests, which have endured over the decades as a curious, intimate look at the inner workings of his creative process.

Filmed during the ’60s-era heyday of his Warhol Factory, the black and white screen tests feature a slew of Warhol regulars — from Ondine to Edie Sedgwick, Lou Reed to Bob Dylan — and other famous faces of the day, all lensed on Warhol’s own Bolex camera. Nearly 500 of the screen tests were filmed, though Warhol did not use or exhibit all of them. Favorites were arranged into various compilations that were then screened by Warhol for assorted audiences, though they’ve continued to inspire and delight fans for decades past their original filming.

Read More: Quad Cinema Reborn:
See full article at Indiewire »

Microwave Massacre

'Worst Movie Ever?'   No way. But neither is Wayne Berwick and comic Jackie Vernon's tacky cannibalism tale a piece of art. When I say it's interesting, it's more as a study item than entertainment. Bad movie -- but a terrific restoration! Microwave Massacre Blu-ray + DVD Arrow Video 1983 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 76 min. / Street Date August 16, 2016 / 34.95 Starring Jackie Vernon, Loren Schein, Al Troupe, Claire Ginsberg, Maria Simon, Lou Ann Webber, Anna Marlowe. Cinematography Karen Grossman Makeup Effects Robert A. Burns Original Music Leif Horvath Editor Steve Nielson Written by Thomas Singer, Craig Muckler Produced by Craig Muckler, Thomas Singer Directed by Wayne Berwick

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

"Well, the only problem is, I can't make love to a woman, unless I eat her." Just as there are celebrities famous simply for being famous, there are movies that are famous for being bad. Last March I took the curiosity plunge and reviewed the notorious Manos,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

John Waters on Restored 'Multiple Maniacs': A 'Movie to Scare Hippies'

John Waters on Restored 'Multiple Maniacs': A 'Movie to Scare Hippies'
"It's even weirder now than it ever was," John Waters says, reflecting on his newly restored, resplendently profane Multiple Maniacs. "When I was watching it again recently, I was thinking, 'No wonder my parents were uptight.' But I'm proud of it."

The Pope of Trash's 1970 feature stars his greatest muse, the raunchy drag queen Divine, as the ringleader of a homicidal sideshow called the Cavalcade of Perversion that sets up camp in — of course — Baltimore. Vulgarity ensues. The poster for the theatrical re-release, restored from film the director had kept in his closet,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Remembering National Society of Film Critics Award-Winning Brazilian Superstar Pêra

Marília Pêra: Actress starred in Brazilian movie classic 'Pixote.' Marília Pêra: Brazilian film, TV and stage star Remembering Brazilian stage, television, and film star Marília Pêra, whose acting and singing career spanned more than five decades. Pêra died of lung cancer on Dec. 5, '15, in Rio de Janeiro. Born Marília Soares Pêra on Jan. 22, 1943, in Rio, she was 72 years old. 'Pixote' prostitute Internationally, Marília Pêra is best known as the loud, vulgar prostitute Sueli, who becomes acquainted with São Paulo street kid Fernando Ramos da Silva in Hector Babenco's well-received social drama Pixote / Pixote: A Lei do Mais Fraco (1981),[1] a fierce indictment of Brazilian society's utter disregard for its disadvantaged members. In one pivotal – and widely talked about scene – she lets the titular character (da Silva, at the time 12 years old)[2] suckle her breast. In another, she pulls down her panties and sits in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Under the Sign of Love: A Dialog with Masha Tupitsyn

  • MUBI
The questions posed by Masha Tupitsyn’s work to date—Love Sounds completes a trilogy that began with Laconia and Love Dog, a pair of books drawn from her writing on Twitter and Tumblr—have generally been variations on “how do we talk about love?” So: How do we talk with love? How do we talk through love? How do we talk around love? How do we talk away from love? How do we talk in love? With Love Sounds, she’s taken these questions, and many more, and used them to grope, like a good archivist, through the thicket of love in English-language cinema. The slightly more than twenty-four hours she has emerged with are offered generously for interpretation, a process helped along by the eight categories, rendered as white text on a black ground, that both structure the work and provide its only images. In the time since
See full article at MUBI »

Under the Sign of Love: A Dialog with Masha Tupitsyn

  • MUBI
The questions posed by Masha Tupitsyn’s work to date—Love Sounds completes a trilogy that began with Laconia and Love Dog, a pair of books drawn from her writing on Twitter and Tumblr—have generally been variations on “how do we talk about love?” So: How do we talk with love? How do we talk through love? How do we talk around love? How do we talk away from love? How do we talk in love? With Love Sounds, she’s taken these questions, and many more, and used them to grope, like a good archivist, through the thicket of love in English-language cinema. The slightly more than twenty-four hours she has emerged with are offered generously for interpretation, a process helped along by the eight categories, rendered as white text on a black ground, that both structure the work and provide its only images. In the time since
See full article at MUBI »

Holly Woodlawn, Andy Warhol Muse and Transgender Actress, Dead at 69

  • The Wrap
Holly Woodlawn, Andy Warhol Muse and Transgender Actress, Dead at 69
Transgender actress Holly Woodlawn, who became famous after starring in Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey’s 1970 films “Trash” and “Women in Revolt,” has died. She was 69. Her former caretaker and friend Mariela Huerta told the Associated Press that Woodlawn died Sunday in Los Angeles after a battle with cancer. Woodlawn was born Harold Danhakl and took her new name after she ran away from home at 15 and hitchhiked to New York City, where she became one of Warhol’s “drag queen superstars.” Her story was the inspiration for the first lines of Lou Reed song “Walk on the Wild Side.
See full article at The Wrap »

Holly Woodlawn Dies: Transgender Actress, Warhol Scene-Maker Was 69

Transgender actress Holly Woodlawn, who enjoyed a measure of fame and notoriety as one of Andy Warhol’s circle of personalities — “superstars” — at the artist’s The Factory in early 1970s New York City, has died. Woodlawn, nee Harold Danhaki in Puerto Rico, was 69 and died Sunday after battling brain and liver cancer in Los Angeles. In addition to the scene at The Factory, Woodlawn appeared in Warhol and Paul Morrissey’s underground classic Trash with Joe Dallesandro
See full article at Deadline TV »

Holly Woodlawn Dies: Transgender Actress, Warhol Scene-Maker Was 69

  • Deadline
Holly Woodlawn Dies: Transgender Actress, Warhol Scene-Maker Was 69
Transgender actress Holly Woodlawn, who enjoyed a measure of fame and notoriety as one of Andy Warhol’s circle of personalities — “superstars” — at the artist’s The Factory in early 1970s New York City, has died. Woodlawn, nee Harold Danhaki in Puerto Rico, was 69 and died Sunday after battling brain and liver cancer in Los Angeles. In addition to the scene at The Factory, Woodlawn appeared in Warhol and Paul Morrissey’s underground classic Trash with Joe Dallesandro
See full article at Deadline »

Holly Woodlawn, Transgender Actress and Warhol Muse, Dies at 69

  • Vulture
Holly Woodlawn, Transgender Actress and Warhol Muse, Dies at 69
Holly Woodlawn, the transgender actress whose rose to fame in the early 1970s through her work with Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey, died on Sunday in Los Angeles after a long battle with cancer. She was 69.Born Haroldo Danhakl in Puerto Rico, Woodlawn grew up in Miami before running away from home at 15 to hitchhike to New York City. Her story famously inspired the first verse of Lou Reed's 1972 "Walk on the Wild Side": "Holly came from Miami, F.L.A. Hitchhiked her way across the U.S.A. Plucked her eyebrows on the way. Shaved her legs and then he was a she. She says, 'Hey, babe, take a walk on the wild side." After spending years in poverty in New York, Woodlawn met Andy Warhol, the man who would make her one of his "superstars," in 1968. By 1970, she starred in Paul Morriseey's Warhol-supported Trash, giving
See full article at Vulture »

Holly Woodlawn, Transgender Actress & Subject of ‘Walk on the Wild Side,’ Dies at 69

Holly Woodlawn, Transgender Actress & Subject of ‘Walk on the Wild Side,’ Dies at 69
Holly Woodlawn, the transgender actress who appeared in Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey films and was the subject of Lou Reed’s song “Walk on the Wild Side,” died Sunday in Los Angeles. She was 69.

The Associated Press reported that she had been suffering from cancer. Most recently, she had appeared in two episodes of “Transparent” as Vivian.

The star of underground films including “Trash” and “Women in Revolt” was born Haroldo Danhakl in Puerto Rico. After moving from Miami to New York and meeting Warhol, she took the name Holly Woodlawn and became one of Warhol’s drag queen “superstars.”

The Reed song recounted her trip to New York: “Holly came from Miami, F.L.A.; Hitch-hiked her way across the U.S.A. Plucked her eyebrows on the way; Shaved her legs and then he was a she. She says, ‘Hey, babe,

Take a walk on the wild side.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Holly Woodlawn, Transgender Actress & Subject of ‘Walk on the Wild Side,’ Dies at 69

Holly Woodlawn, Transgender Actress & Subject of ‘Walk on the Wild Side,’ Dies at 69
Holly Woodlawn, the transgender actress who appeared in Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey films and was the subject of Lou Reed’s song “Walk on the Wild Side,” died Sunday in Los Angeles. She was 69.

The Associated Press reported that she had been suffering from cancer. Most recently, she had appeared in two episodes of “Transparent” as Vivian.

The star of underground films including “Trash” and “Women in Revolt” was born Haroldo Danhakl in Puerto Rico. After moving from Miami to New York and meeting Warhol, she took the name Holly Woodlawn and became one of Warhol’s drag queen “superstars.”

The Reed song recounted her trip to New York: “Holly came from Miami, F.L.A.; Hitch-hiked her way across the U.S.A. Plucked her eyebrows on the way; Shaved her legs and then he was a she. She says, ‘Hey, babe,

Take a walk on the wild side.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

“Against, against”: Creative Destruction with Albert Serra

  • MUBI
This interview was originally published online by Sight & Sound. It is being re-published on the Notebook in conjunction with Albert Serra's Story of My Death playing on Mubi in most countries in the world through December 14, 2015.If new movie masterpieces are proclaimed at each and every major film festival each and every year, the notable absence of adventurous, exciting and otherwise transgressive cinema amongst those lauded should inspire us to question not only the terms we use to describe films but also the standards to which we hold them.Catalan filmmaker Albert Serra, a transcendental minimalist who wields his camera like only a handful of fellow feature-film digital adventurers – among them Pedro Costa, David Lynch and Michael Mann – is one of the few who produces work that truly creates a new encounter with the audience. His radically stripped-down, voluptuously shaggy adaptations of canonical writing – Cervantes in Honour of the Knights
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Pasolini, Grandrieux, Warhol

  • Keyframe
More articles, videos and interviews commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of Pier Paolo Pasolini. Also in today's roundup: Interviews with Philippe Grandrieux, Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey, Mathieu Amalric, Ulrich Seidl and Carolee Schneemann, new books on Douglas Fairbanks and Richard Pryor, Jacques Rancière on Béla Tarr, Seijun Suzuki in Austin and news of forthcoming films by Asghar Farhadi, Wim Wenders and Walter Hill. Plus, the return of Star Trek, Abel Ferrara and Gaspar Noé in conversation—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

200 Greatest Horror Films (50-41)

  • SoundOnSight
Special Mention: Dead Ringers

Directed by David Cronenberg

Written by David Cronenberg and Norman Snider

Canada, 1988

Genre: Thriller / Drama

Dead Ringers is one of David Cronenberg’s masterpieces, and Jeremy Irons gives the most highly accomplished performance of his entire career – times two. This is the story of Beverly and Elliot Mantle (both played by Irons), identical twins who, since birth, have been inseparable. Together, they work as gynecologists in their own clinic, and literally share everything between them, including the women they work and sleep with. Jealousy comes between the two when Beverly falls in love with a new patient and decides he no longer wants to share his lady friend with Elliot. The twins, who have always existed together as one, have trouble adapting and soon turn against one another. Unlike the director’s previous films, the biological horror in Dead Ringers is entirely conveyed through the psychological
See full article at SoundOnSight »

200 Greatest Horror Films (200-191)

Every year, we here at PopOptiq celebrate the month of October with a series of articles we like to call 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list to 200 movies, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles.

Note: Since there are so many great horror films and so much to choose from, I am including documentaries, short films and animated films as special mentions in order to make it easier for me to decide what to include.

****

Special Mention: King Kong

Directed by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack

Written by James Ashmore Creelman and Ruth Rose

USA, 1933

The granddaddy of all monster movies is arguably King Kong. Decades after its release, no other monster
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Forgotten Actress Bruce on TCM: Career Went from Dawn of Talkies to L.A.'s Punk Rock Scene

Virginia Bruce: MGM actress ca. 1935. Virginia Bruce movies on TCM: Actress was the cherry on 'The Great Ziegfeld' wedding cake Unfortunately, Turner Classic Movies has chosen not to feature any non-Hollywood stars – or any out-and-out silent film stars – in its 2015 “Summer Under the Stars” series.* On the other hand, TCM has come up with several unusual inclusions, e.g., Lee J. Cobb, Warren Oates, Mae Clarke, and today, Aug. 25, Virginia Bruce. A second-rank MGM leading lady in the 1930s, the Minneapolis-born Virginia Bruce is little remembered today despite her more than 70 feature films in a career that spanned two decades, from the dawn of the talkie era to the dawn of the TV era, in addition to a handful of comebacks going all the way to 1981 – the dawn of the personal computer era. Career highlights were few and not all that bright. Examples range from playing the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites