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Tommy’s Honour Review

Author: Stefan Pape

Whether you’re a fan of golf or not, there’s a sense of tradition to the sport, a social element that derives from playing, and one heightened by watching and conversing amongst likeminded friends, celebrating a game that has existed for centuries – and thrives in that very knowledge. In Tommy’s Honour that same sense of ritualism is projected onto our protagonists, as we examine a captivating father-son dynamic, and how rules and traditions are not only passed down through sport, but through family.

Directed by Jason Connery, Tommy’s Honour begins as a journalist from London interrupts the elderly Tom Morris (Peter Mullan) during an afternoon swim, hoping he’ll be granted permission to tell his life story, of the man accredited as being the founding father of the sport of golf. He’s also an accomplished course designer, instructor, clubmaker – and of course, a rather talented golfer himself.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Jason Connery, Sean Connery’s Son, Talks Directing His Movie ‘Tommy’s Honour’ [Video Exclusive]

Jason Connery Talks New Movie, ‘Tommy’s Honour’ by Uinterview Jason Connery, the director of the new film Tommy’s Honour, recently sat down with uInterview to discuss the movie, the history behind the story, and all the work that went into making it a reality. Tommy’s Honour tells the story of Tom Morris and his son Tommy, […]

Source: uInterview

The post Jason Connery, Sean Connery’s Son, Talks Directing His Movie ‘Tommy’s Honour’ [Video Exclusive] appeared first on uInterview.
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Review: ‘Tommy’s Honour’ Offers a Rousing Look at a Heroic Figure

I’ve never been one for golf — playing or watching. I know many who feel the same and many of those who found themselves becoming fans during Tiger Woods’ heyday anyway. You can’t blame them for it either. Celebrity, national pride, and the excitement surrounding both are tough to combat. The draw therefore became peoples’ desire to see what Tiger did: which tournaments he won, who he beat, and by what margin. Golf became secondary to this hero’s allure like many other sports before it throughout history. But this wasn’t the first (or surely the last) time this specific sport found that sense of enthusiasm beyond staunch practitioners. In nineteenth century Scotland “Young” Tom Morris did the same. Beyond increasing golf’s popularity, though, he also literally changed the game.

Now that’s actually something I can get behind. It’s a simplification, but discovering that golf
See full article at The Film Stage »

Interview: Jack Lowden & Ophelia Lovibond of ‘Tommy’s Honour’

Chicago – Combining the history of golf with a heartbreaking romance seems like a contradiction, but the new film “Tommy’s Honour” does it fluidly, in part because of the two young actors portraying the romance. Jack Lowden and Ophelia Lovibond are the actors who anchor the film, and also are breaking out as performers.

The film – directed by Jason Connery – tells the story of Tommy Morris (Lowden), whose star burned brightly in the game of golf in its 19th Century roots in Scotland. His father, “Old” Tom Morris (Peter Mullan), was an innovator who helped to bring the game into the modern era, and the father/son dynamic is part of the story. The other element is the relationship between Tommy and his eventual wife Meg Drinnen (Lovibond), a pairing that has its own passionate destiny. With the backdrop of Scotland, the couple start their life together while Tommy becomes
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Tommy’S Honour – Review

Jack Lowden stars as Tommy Morris in Tommy’S Honour. Photo by Neil Davidson (c). Courtesy of Roadside Attractions.

Tommy’S Honour focuses on the mid-19th century founding of modern golf by a Scottish father and son, but it is as much about the British class system and a family as it is about golf.

This well-acted, authentically-detailed historical film spotlights Old Tom and Young Tom Morris, the working-class father and son who both founded the modern game and popularized it in the mid-19th century. Greens keeper and course pro at St. Andrews, Tom Morris Sr. did not invent the sport but he did much to mold it into its present form, making clubs and balls in the golf shop he owned and later designing golf courses. “Old Tom” was a talented player who established the first championship and won many bets for his aristocratic backers, but his
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Tommy’s Honour’ Exclusive Clip: Birth of Modern Golf Makes for One Riveting Movie Drama — Watch

Golf biopic “Tommy’s Honour,” which premiered at the 2016 Edinburgh International Film Festival, is ready for its theatrical release this Friday, April 14. Watch an exclusive clip from the film below.

Read More: ‘Do Donkeys Act?’ Exclusive Clips: Willem Dafoe Narrates This Unexpectedly Emotional Documentary — Watch

Based on Kevin Cook’s 2007 novel of the same name, “Tommy’s Honour” tells the real-life tale of “Old” Tom Morris (Peter Mullan) and “Young” Tommy Morris (Jack Lowden), the father-son team regarded as “the real-life founders of the modern game of golf.” As their fame rose during the 1860s-70s, their relationship deteriorated. Tommy’s talent and fame grew to outshine his father’s accomplishments in the sport.

Read More: 2017 Cannes Film Festival Announces Lineup: Todd Haynes, Sofia Coppola, ‘Twin Peaks’ and More

Actor-turned-director Jason Connery (“The Devil’s Tomb,” “Philly Kid”) helms the film from a screenplay by newcomers Pamela Marin and Kevin Cook.
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review: Celebrating golf’s earliest champions, Tommy’s Honour is par for the biopic course

“There’s only one story you’ll get out of me,” says the bearded old man to the reporter. The reporter is there to talk about the legendary Tommy Morris, a champion golfer in his youth. But the older man, who frames the ensuing story but does not actually narrate it, is the reason Morris was referred to as Young Tommy: He’s Tommy’s father, also named Tom Morris (Peter Mullan), commonly known as Old Tom. Old Tom founded the Open Championship in 1860 and won several of them, but playing golf on its own doesn’t rate as a career in 19th-century Scotland. As Tommy’s Honour opens, Old Tom works at a golf club, offering lessons and equipment, teaching his children the trade.

Early on, it becomes clear that Young Tommy (Jack Lowden) may be even better at the family sport. He’s also clearly less inclined ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Poster and trailer for golfing biopic Tommy’s Honour starring Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden

The first poster and trailer have arrived online for director Jason Connery’s upcoming drama Tommy’s Honour. Based on Kevin Cook’s Tommy’s Honor: The Story of Old Tom Morris and Young Tom Morris, Golf’s Founding Father and Son, it tells the story of the pioneering golfing champions Old Tom Morris and his son Young Tom Morris, played by Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden. The film premiered last year at the Edinburgh International Film Festival and went on to win Best Feature Film at the 2016 British Academy Scotland Awards. Check out the poster and trailer here…

Tommy’S Honour is based on the powerfully moving true story of the challenging relationship between “Old” Tom and “Young” Tommy Morris, the dynamic father-son team who ushered in the modern game of golf. As their fame grew, Tom and Tommy, Scotland’s Golf Royalty, were touched by drama and personal tragedy.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Tommy’s Honour’: Film Review | Palm Springs 2017

As the widely acknowledged home of golf, Scotland holds a particular attraction for both professional and amateur players, who revere the region’s renowned courses and celebrate its pivotal place in the history of the sport. Central to that heritage are the names Tom Morris (known as Old Tom) and Tommy Morris (Young Tom), 19th century originators of the contemporary game’s most distinguishing features, many of them detailed in Kevin Cook’s 2007 book, Tommy's Honor: The Story of Old Tom Morris and Young Tom Morris, Golf's Founding Father and Son.

Adapted by Scotsman Jason Connery, himself an avid golfer like his...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

First Trailer for 'Tommy's Honour' About the Scottish Founders Golf

The pride of a father. The love of a wife. The soul of a rebel. The heart of a champion. Roadside Attractions has debuted a trailer for a film titled Tommy's Honour, about the founders of the modern sport of golf. The film focuses on Tommy Morris, played by Jack Lowden, and his father Tom Morris, played by Peter Mullan, two golfing legends who helped make the sport into what it is today. Set in the 1800s, these two Toms helped redefine the sport at a time when Scottish golfers were considered low-class players. The cast includes Sam Neill, Ophelia Lovibond, Peter Ferdinando, Max Deacon and Paul Reid. This looks like a fine drama about a desire to rewrite the expectations of society, proving that anyone can be successful. Here's the official trailer (+ poster) for Jason Connery's Tommy's Honour, in high def from Apple: In every generation, a torch passes from father to son.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

BAFTA honours Tommy's Honour by Amber Wilkinson - 2016-11-07 09:44:48

Peter Mullan plays golfer Tom Morris Photo: Courtesy of Edinburgh Film Festival Jason Connery's golf drama Tommy's Honour was named Best Feature Film at the BAFTA Scotland awards last night.

It was a good night for its co-star Peter Mullan - who plays Tom Morris Snr in the film, alongside Jack Lowden - as he was named Best Actor for his portrayal of the titular homeless character in Jake Gavin's Hector.

The Best Actress award went to Kate Dickie for her role in Tom Geens' Couple In A Hole. The animation prize was won by Cat Bruce, for No Place Like Home, while the short film prize went to Duncan Cowles and writer Ross Hogg for their study of memory and identity, Isabella - it was a particular moment of triumph for Hogg, as it is his first BAFTA win after being nominated four times in the past four years.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Golfing Origins Movie ‘Tommy’s Honour’ Lands at Roadside Attractions

Roadside Attractions has acquired the U.S. rights to golfing origins movie “Tommy’s Honour” from Gutta Percha Productions.

The drama, which was the opening night film at the Edinburgh International Film Festival, is directed by Jason Connery. Pamela Marin and Kevin Cook wrote the screenplay, an adaptation from Cook’s acclaimed book of the same name.

Keith Bank of Kb Partners, who negotiated the deal, serves as producer along with Bob Last of Holdings Ecosse, Jim Kreutzer of Wind Chill Media Group, and Tim Moore of Top Dawg Productions, with Kenneth Whitney executive producing. The movie will be released theatrically on March 24.

Roadside’s deal covers theatrical, DVD, VOD, and pay rights, with Golf Channel securing basic cable rights. International sales are being handled by Timeless Films.

The story centers on Scottish golfer Tom Morris’ relationship with his son Tommy, who matched his father’s achievement with four British
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tommy's Honour review – well-pitched performances bring golf biopic up to par

This story of teenage golf sensation ‘Young’ Tom Morris is a decent rather than dazzling film to open the Edinburgh film festival, kept on course Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden as father and son

Jason Connery – son of Sean – is still probably best known for his mid-1980s stint in the TV series Robin of Sherwood, but he’s been directing features for a few years now: mostly obscure sci-fi and thrillers, but this, his fifth, has got a modicum of wider interest to it. Tommy’s Honour is a conventional, old-fashioned, biopic of early golf champ “Young” Tom Morris, who remains the youngest ever winner of the British Open as a 17-year-old in 1868, and who succumbed to an appallingly early death just seven years later.

Morris is portrayed with enthusiasm and no little charm by Jack Lowden, who channels a sort of bristling young lion challenge towards his father,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Edinburgh 2016: Tommy's Honour review

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ "There's only one story you'll get from me," growls Peter Mullan from behind a hedgerow of coarse woolly beard. As Tom Morris in Tommy's Honour, the veteran Scottish actor embodies the pioneering exploits of a St. Andrews man who inaugurated the Open Championship from his humble standing as greenkeeper and caddie to the club's upper echelons. In designing courses and handcrafting clubs with the help of his sons, Morris paved the way for the sport of golf. However, the tale at hand offers more than mere sporting biopic.
See full article at CineVue »

Edinburgh film festival waves flag for Scottish cinema's independence

With gala showings dedicated to whisky and golf movies, and strong Scots connections throughout, there’s a buzz about Scotland’s film industry – despite suggestions of deep-rooted problems elsewhere

The story of the father and son who practically invented the modern game of golf in the mid-19th century from the then-isolated outpost of Prestwick on the Ayrshire coast; a comic paean to the “water of life” after a ship full of whisky hits the rocks and crafty locals do their best to hang on to the cargo. Few films would seem more archetypally Scots than Tommy’s Honour, a biopic of pioneering golf champion Young Tom Morris, and Whisky Galore, the remake of the classic Ealing comedy featuring Gregor Fisher (aka Rab C Nesbitt). As the films occupying the high-profile opening and closing gala slots at the Edinburgh international film festival, their cultural capital is entirely appropriate.

If you go to any festival you want to see what's happening in the domestic cinema

We won’t have a proper industry here if all we do is entertain the Americans. We've got to make stuff ourselves

If ever there was a time for Scotland to be succeeding as a product, it should be now

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Edinburgh film festival waves flag for Scottish cinema's independence

With gala showings dedicated to whisky and golf movies, and strong Scots connections throughout, there’s a buzz about Scotland’s film industry – despite suggestions of deep-rooted problems elsewhere

The story of the father and son who practically invented the modern game of golf in the mid-19th century from the then-isolated outpost of Prestwick on the Ayrshire coast; a comic paean to the “water of life” after a ship full of whisky hits the rocks and crafty locals do their best to hang on to the cargo. Few films would seem more archetypally Scots than Tommy’s Honour, a biopic of pioneering golf champion Young Tom Morris, and Whisky Galore, the remake of the classic Ealing comedy featuring Gregor Fisher (aka Rab C Nesbitt). As the films occupying the high-profile opening and closing gala slots at the Edinburgh international film festival, their cultural capital is entirely appropriate.

If you go to any festival you want to see what's happening in the domestic cinema

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tommy's Honour to open Eiff by Amber Wilkinson - 2016-04-27 15:57:33

Peter Mullan plays golfer Tom Morris Photo: Courtesy of Edinburgh Film Festival Edinburgh International Film Festival will open its 70th edition with Jason Connery's Tommy’s Honour, starring Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden, on June 15.

Shot entirely on location in Scotland, the drama is based on the true story of golfing pioneer Tom Morris and his turbulent relationship with his son Tommy. Mullan and Lowden take on the roles of father and son, alongside an ensemble cast including Ophelia Lovibond, Peter Ferdinando and Sam Neill. Key cast will be in attendance on Opening night.

Produced by Bob Last - the former chair for the Centre For The Moving Image, which oversees the Eiff - Tommy’s Honour tells the story of Tom Morris’ relationship with his son Tommy, who showed a remarkable talent of his own and matched his father's sporting achievements. However, father and son clash over the unwritten rules of social class,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Creative Scotland launches $2.7m fund

  • ScreenDaily
The fund will target productions that bring benefits to the Scottish film sector and economy.

In what Creative Scotland’s Director of Film & Media, Natalie Usher, is describing as “a really fantastic offering,” the new Scottish $2.7m (£1.75m) Production Growth Fund (Pgf) has launched and is open for applications today.

“It is a fund that will be attractive to feature film and high-end TV drama productions that will be accessing the UK tax credits,” Usher told ScreenDaily.

“What we are trying to do is bring bigger productions here and to hold on to productions from Scottish-based producers who might otherwise go to other nations or parts of the UK.”

Investments from the Pgf are non-recoupable and will reward productions that bring benefits to the Scottish film sector and economy.

A total of £750,000 is available for the period until March 31 2016 and a further £1m is earmarked for 2016/17.

The maximum any production can receive from the Pgf is £500,000 -
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Casting: Gad, Fox, Tipton, Macfadyen, Neill

Russ and Roger Go Beyond

Josh Gad has closed a deal to play legendary film critic Roger Ebert in the Michael Winterbottom-directed comedy "Russ & Roger Go Beyond" for Stx Entertainment. Gad will play opposite Will Ferrell as sexploitation maestro Russ Meyer.

The debauched comedy follows two no-holds-barred outsiders who defied the Hollywood establishment to make "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls," one of the first X-rated films ever released by a major movie studio. Filming begins later this year. [Source: Variety]

A.R.C.H.I.E.

Michael J. Fox will lend his voice to the role of a robotic dog in Robin Dunne's upcoming independent family comedy "A.R.C.H.I.E." at Trilight Entertainment and Clairwood Capital.

Katharine Isabelle plays a world-renowned roboticist who has created Archie to look like a normal dog while having super strength, X-ray vision and the ability to talk. While her research program is shut down by the military, she helps Archie
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Sam Neill Plays For Tommy's Honour

Sam Neill Plays For Tommy's Honour
Clearly having inherited his father's love of golf, Jason Connery has just begun principal photography Tommy's Honour, based on Kevin Cook's acclaimed history of golfing pioneer Old Tom Morris and his son Tommy. Peter Mullen and Jack Lowden are playing, respectively, the older and younger Morris men, with Ophelia Lovibond as Tommy's wife Meg. And latest to join the cast is Sam Neill, as R&A captain Alexander Boothby.Pamela Marin co-wrote the screenplay with Cook. The story revolves around St Andrews legend Old Tom's relationship with Tommy, who showed a remarkable golfing talent of his own and matched his father's achievement with four Open wins (the first at the age of 17), managing the feat in consecutive championships. Although both father and son profited from their share of rich gamblers' side bets on their matches, times were still hard and life for the Morris family in mid-Victorian Scotland brought
See full article at EmpireOnline »
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