News

U.K. Casting: London Actors Needed for ‘Mimi and the Mountain Dragon’ Christmas Show

Hello and welcome to one of our shoutouts for projects casting around the U.K. As always there’s a mix of opportunities for all ages, abilities, and locations but do remember to check if you fit the bill before applying. Although we make every attempt to verify castings before we hit publish, please ensure that you do your own research before firing off those headshots and Backstage links. “Mimi and the Mountain Dragon”Are you an actor, singer, and puppeteer? If so, Skewbald Theatre is looking to cast their Christmas production, an adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s “Mimi and the Mountain Dragon”, at the Winterville Festival in London with a short run at Trestle Theatre, St. Albans and the Bloomsbury Studio, London this Autumn. Actors should have strength in storytelling but can be any gender or ethnicity. Initial auditions will be held on the 6th and 7th of September
See full article at Backstage »

See Princess Kate Live Out Her Secret Dream of Being a Farmer!

Princess Kate wasn’t kidding last year when she revealed her secret dream of being a farmer. And on Wednesday, she got to put that dream into action during a visit to Farms for City Children in Arlingham, Gloucester.

The royal mom, who was dressed down in a khaki coat, brown leggings and her favorite 12-year-old boots, was on hand to see how young people from inner cities get the chance to spend a week on a real working farm. She met with schoolchildren and teachers as they toured around they showed her around the grounds.

Farms for City Children
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Simon Mayo interview: Blame, writing, Kermode, Stephen King

Simon Brew Jul 21, 2016

Simon Mayo chats to us about writing, the importance of Stephen King, politics, Blame, and Basil Exposition...

Simon Mayo is a man of many talents. To cinema folk, he's one of the two voices behind Wittertainment, the BBC's flagship film programme (wassup, etc). To others, he plays choice songs on Radio 2. To me: he was also chairman of Melchester Rovers. And to a growing number of people, he's the author of some really fine works of fiction.

His latest, Blame, sees him heading into the world of Young Adult. And over a hot drink (him: civilised green tea, me: coffee caffeine rocket fuel concoction, no biscuits) we had a chat about what could almost be an accidental shift into non-fiction...

The last time I interviewed you I messed up my opening question when I tried to follow the Simon Mayo interview handbook, but I think I’ve got this nailed now.
See full article at Den of Geek »

50 brilliant independent bookshops in the UK

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We're celebrating 50 brilliant UK independent bookshops. If your favourite is missing, please add it to the list below...

In Neil Gaiman’s preface to Shelf Life: Fantastic Stories Celebrating Bookstores, he describes four bookshops from his childhood. One was a travelling school shop, one a local store staffed by a helpful hippy where he’d pick up 25p Tom Disch novels, another was a bus ride away and owned by a Grinch who’d glower at schoolchildren customers, and the last was a now-defunct Soho sci-fi and fantasy treasure trove. Four individual shops run by booksellers with distinct personalities and idiosyncratic tastes. All of which made Gaiman what he is.

That’s the joy of independent bookshops. Their personalities shape those of the people who visit them. They’re not homogenous. Their stock tends to reflect their passions rather than the year's best-performing unit-shifters. And their
See full article at Den of Geek »

The best Christmas 2014 TV and radio

We’ve scanned the UK Christmas TV and radio schedules for the festive fortnight and circled a few programmes you may enjoy…

We’ve taken our glittery pen to the pages of this year’s festive TV Listings guide to circle a selection of shows that might tickle your Christmas fancy.

Supplement your festive box-set viewing with appearances from the Doctor and Clara, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, Dame Judi Dench, Professor Danielle George, the work of Roald Dahl, Charlie Brooker, David Attenborough, the much-missed Rik Mayall, and many more...

Drama Doctor Who: Last Christmas

The tenth annual Doctor Who Christmas Special since the show’s 2005 return, and Peter Capaldi’s first real festive Tardis adventure. Nick Frost, Michael Troughton, Dan Starkey and Nathan McMullen all co-star in this Father Christmas North Pole caper, alongside Capaldi and Jenna Coleman. Watch the latest trailer, here.

When’s it on? 6.15pm on Christmas Day,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Kaleidoscope flies with Big Bird

  • ScreenDaily
Kaleidoscope flies with Big Bird
Exclusive: UK sales outfit nabs doc I Am Big Bird [pictured].

UK sales outfit Kaleidoscope has picked up documentary I Am Big Bird, the story of Caroll Spinney, the man who has played Sesame Street’s Big Bird since 1969.

The deal covers worldwide distribution of all rights, excluding North America.

Chad N. Walker and Dave Lamattina of Copper Pot Pictures direct.

The film has played at a number of festivals including Hot Docs, AFI Docs and Docnyc.

The deal was signed by Caroline Stern, director of sales and acquisition at Kaleidoscope, and Abby Davis at Preferred Content.

Stern said: “We needed only to see the first few images from the film to fall in love with it. But as the story of the little known man behind the feathers, it takes a compelling look at how artist and entertainer Caroll Spinney brought Big Bird to life - and how that shaped him and us, globally over the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Fury’, ‘Foxcatcher’, ‘Mr. Turner’ headline BFI 58th London Film Festival 2014

Fury (David Ayer)

[via the BFI]

The programme for the 58th BFI London Film Festival launched today, with Festival Director Clare Stewart presenting this year’s rich and diverse selection of films and events. The lineup includes highly anticipated fall titles including David Ayer’s Fury, Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher, the Sundance smash Whiplash, Jean-Luc Godard’s Goodbye to Language 3D, The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner, Jason Reitman’s Men, Women and Children and Jean-Marc Vallee’s Wild.

As Britain’s leading film event and one of the world’s oldest film festivals, it introduces the finest new British and international films to an expanding London and UK-wide audience, offering a compelling combination of red carpet glamour, engaged audiences and vibrant exchange. The Festival provides an essential profiling opportunity for films seeking global success at the start of the Awards season, promotes the careers of British and
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Artax, Silver, Joey, Shadowfax: 11 greatest movie and TV horses

Artax, Silver, Joey, Shadowfax: 11 greatest movie and TV horses
We were saddened by the news that Gandalf's faithful grey horse Shadowfax - real name Blanco - had died after suffering from an illness last week.

So we thought we'd take the opportunity to stop mourning and instead celebrate Shadowfax and ten other great fictional horses on TV and the silver screen below:

1. Silver

"Hi-Yo Silver! Away!" were the trademark commands of the Lone Ranger to Silver, the magnificent fictional white stallion from the iconic Us radio show and TV series.

A chestnut mare called Dusty was Silver's original predecessor, which is revealed in the 1938 episode The Legend of Silver. When the Lone Ranger saves Silver's life from a savage buffalo, Silver gives up living in the wild, wild west to instead carry the masked former Texas Ranger as his loyal equestrian companion.

2. Seabiscuit

"Let's go, Pops!" Seabiscuit was a real racehorse during the Great Depression in the Us who
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Artax, Silver, Mister Ed, Joey, more: 11 Greatest fictional horses

Artax, Silver, Mister Ed, Joey, more: 11 Greatest fictional horses
We were saddened by the news that Gandalf's faithful grey horse Shadowfax - real name Blanco - had died after suffering from an illness last week.

So we thought we'd take the opportunity to stop mourning and instead celebrate Shadowfax and ten other great fictional horses on TV and the silver screen below:

1. Silver

"Hi-Yo Silver! Away!" were the trademark commands of the Lone Ranger to Silver, the magnificent fictional white stallion from the iconic Us radio show and TV series.

A chestnut mare called Dusty was Silver's original predecessor, which is revealed in the 1938 episode The Legend of Silver. When the Lone Ranger saves Silver's life from a savage buffalo, Silver gives up living in the wild, wild west to instead carry the masked former Texas Ranger as his loyal equestrian companion.

2. Seabiscuit

"Let's go, Pops!" Seabiscuit was a real racehorse during the Great Depression in the Us who
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

What to see: Lyn Gardner's theatre tips

A Fake Moon rises over Bristol at the Ibt festival, Philip Pullman's I Was a Rat! scurries into Birmingham, and James McAvoy tackles the Scottish play in London

North

The big opening this week is Roger McGough's new version of Molière's The Misanthrope at Liverpool Playhouse, which should be fun. Theatre meets music gigs in 154 Collective's Dancing With the Orange Dog, which is at Stockton Arts Centre on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Hairspray is out on tour again and is at the Lowry in Salford. In Manchester, meanwhile, Queer Contact celebrates the best in Lgbt art and culture this weekend. The moving first-world-war drama, The Accrington Pals, continues at the Exchange. David Copperfield begins at the Oldham Coliseum tonight. This looks intriguing: at Haphazard at Z-arts on Saturday is Word of Warning's day of live art for all ages. The Edinburgh hit, Unmythable – all the Greek myths in 70 minutes
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Why is Susan Hill pleading poverty when The Woman in Black's film adaptation took £20m in the UK?

Despite multimillion-dollar budgets, a big-screen adaptation of a popular book may not result in untold riches for its original author

Penniless novelists may not weep for Susan Hill. The author of The Woman in Black claims she is "broke" despite the Daniel Radcliffe-led adaptation of her 1983 novel taking more than $US50m in the Us and £20m in the UK. Hill's stage play of the same story has run in the West End for 23 years and the 69-year-old author of acclaimed novels such as A Bit of Singing and Dancing lives on a 50-acre farm in Gloucestershire and even has her own publishing imprint.

But she has a good point. "Films always make everyone else rich save the author," she tweeted to one of her followers. "Film accounting", she told another, is "very weird".

Hollywood needs authors. Five of the nine films nominated for best picture at this year's Oscars were adapted from novels,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

War Horse by Michael Morpurgo, film by Steven Spielberg - review

'Michael Morpurgo portrays the brilliance of the plot and Steven Spielberg brought it into the spotlight with pinpoint perfection'

It was the year 1914 in the town of Devon, set away into the mountains. A boy watched the birth of a young horse. Little did he know that he would shape the horse's future. His name was Albert Narracott.

Being the son of a former soldier, Albert was a strong willed and determined boy. He was excited when his father bought the unsteady thoroughbred horse. He was not irked by the fact that his father had wasted all their money on the weak-legged beast. He realized that the situation was worse than it seemed. They were already feeling the clutches of poverty but his father had spent most of their money on the horse. Albert was unmoved and spent most of his time training the horse he called Joey. Soon
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'War Horse' trailer touts Steven Spielberg's pony in Oscars derby [Video]

'War Horse' trailer touts Steven Spielberg's pony in Oscars derby [Video]
This year's Best Picture presenter at the Oscars was Steven Spielberg who could be back at the Kodak next year to collect that same Academy Award for his adaptation of the novel "War Horse." The best-seller by Michael Morpurgo tells the tale of a young English farmhand who enlists during Ww I in hopes of finding his beloved colt who has been sold to the cavalry. Oscar nominees RIchard Curtis ("Four Weddings and a Funeral) and Lee Hall ("Billy Elliot") adapted the 1982 Whitbread runner-up. Newcomer Jeremy Irvine plays the boy with two-time Oscar nominee Emily Watson and Peter Mullans as his parents, and Benedict Cumberbatch as an army officer. The film is being released stateside on Dec. 28. Vote For: All of your TV favorites here. Log your predictions for the Emmys. Compete against experts! Make Your Predictions! Four years ago, helmer Nick Stafford turned the epic story into a stunning

Books and TV need to find a happy medium

As Jo Brand has shown, it's difficult to make a good TV show about books. But in the 1970s, the BBC pulled it off brilliantly

Television is a cool medium. The relationship between the viewer and the screen is low temperature and passive. Books, on the other hand, have always been hot. However tranquil their circumstances, readers will be actively engaged in the book. Their responses are rarely indifferent, often passionate. The paradox of books and television is that, while the moving image seems more vivid than the printed page, actually the reverse is true because books mobilise our imaginations. How, then, do you make a marriage between this ill-assorted couple? Answer: with difficulty.

This year, the BBC has responded to World Book Day with an innovative package of book-related television programmes, every one of which has probably frustrated its matchmaker's hopes. Saturday's celebration of World Book Night, hosted by Andrew Graham-Dixon,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Can epic 'War Horse' win Tonys and Oscars in same year?

Can epic 'War Horse' win Tonys and Oscars in same year?
This year's Best Picture presenter at the Oscars was Steven Spielberg who could be back at the Kodak next year to collect that same Academy Award for his adaptation of the novel "War Horse." The best-seller by Michael Morpurgo tells the tale of a young English farmhand who enlists during Ww I in hopes of finding his beloved colt who has been sold to the cavalry. Oscar nominees RIchard Curtis ("Four Weddings and a Funeral) and Lee Hall ("Billy Elliot") adapted the 1982 Whitbread runner-up. Newcomer Jeremy Irvine plays the boy with two-time Oscar nominee Emily Watson and Peter Mullans as his parents, and Benedict Cumberbatch as an army officer.  Four years ago, helmer Nick Stafford turned the epic story into a stunning stage spectacle at the National Theater. The innovative production, which included both actors and puppeteers, won the 2007 Evening Standard, Critics' Circle and Laurence Olivier Awards for set design (Rae Smith and Han.
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Thor's' Tom Hiddleston Cast in Steven Spielberg's 'War Horse'

'Thor's' Tom Hiddleston Cast in Steven Spielberg's 'War Horse'
By Jeff Sneider 

 

"Thor" star Tom Hiddleston has been cast as one of the leads in Steven Spielberg's "War Horse." The news appeared in the latest issue of Production Weekly, and was corroborated to TheWrap by a person familiar with correspondence related to the casting. TheWrap's calls to Hiddleston's various representatives were not immediately returned, while a DreamWorks spokesman declined to comment. 

Adapted from Michael Morpurgo's...
See full article at The Wrap »

Olympics 2012: London's mascots Wenlock, Mandeville unveiled; what the heck are they?

  • Pop2it
At first glance, London's mascots for the 2012 Olympic games appear to be some kind of mini futuristic cyclops creatures.

So what exactly does that have to do with London?

Named Wenlock and Mandeville after small English towns, these one-eyed creations are based on a story by children's author Michael Morpurgo in which they're formed by a welder from the last drops of steel used to build the girders for the Olympic stadium in east London.

And if you're wondering about the significance of the orange light atop their heads (or giant eyes, rather), that's supposed to represent a London taxi light. The over-sized eye represents a camera lens that will capture their experiences on the way to 2012.

The new mascots were unveiled to the media at the St. Paul's Whitechapel primary school in east London on Wednesday (May 19). While adults might have been left scratching their heads, children responded with
See full article at Pop2it »

Steven Spielberg takes a prestige turn with 'War Horse'

After shooting the motion-capture picture "The Adventures of Tin-Tin: The Secret of the Unicorn," which has a long post-production process, Steven Spielberg has been debating what to direct next.  After considering a biopic about George Gershwin and the Sci-Fi thriller "Robopocalypse," the cinema icon has finally decided to return to the front with "War Horse." Originally published in 1982, Michael Morpurgo's novel about a young boy and a horse whose lives intertwine through the course of World War I actually caught Spielberg's eye as a stage play. The acclaimed and hit West End adaptation by Nick Stafford convinced Spielberg and DreamWorks...
See full article at Hitfix »

Dream Works acquires rights to the book War Horse - News

DreamWorks Studios has acquired the rights to the book, "War Horse," it was announced today by DreamWorks partners Stacey Snider and Steven Spielberg. Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall and Revel Guest will produce the dramatic adventure set during World War I. Lee Hall has been set to write the screenplay. "War Horse" was written by Michael Morpurgo and is published by Egmont Press. It was first published by Kaye & Ward in 1982. That same year it was a runner-up......
See full article at GlamSham »

Director Steven Spielberg is to join forces with the Billy Elliott writer Lee Hall to turn a ...

Director Steven Spielberg is to join forces with the Billy Elliott writer Lee Hall to turn a World War 1 novel into a movie. The 63-year-old is to adapt the 1982 book Warhorse by Michael Morpurgo into a Hollywood blockbuster. The story follows the relationship between a boy and his horse set in the Great War. Hall will be adapting the book for the big screen and Spielberg will produce. It is not known if he will also be directing. Spielberg said to Variety: 'From the moment I read the book, I knew this was a film I wanted to make. 'Its heart and its message provide a story that can be felt in every country.'
See full article at Monsters and Critics »
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