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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

1-20 of 22 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Jules And Jim Criterion Blu-ray Review

19 April 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Love triangles in cinema are as old as cinema itself, but most play out along a few generally similar lines.  Few take a path so unique as the course taken in François Truffaut’s Jules and Jim, a landmark of the French New Wave, a film that on one hand may seem like a light-hearted romance but on the other hand hits notes of great sadness and ugliness in the realism emblematic of the movement.  My Jules and Jim Criterion Blu-ray review after the jump. Jules and Jim begins in pre-World War I Paris, when Austrian Jules (Oskar Werner) and Frenchman Jim (Henri Serre) meet and immediately bond over a shared love of art and women.  The closest of friends, they share everything.  Watching a slide-show, they both become entranced with the smile of a particular statue and subsequently seek out the statue itself, promising to take action if ever »

- Jackson

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Martyn Auty on Richard Broke's 'impish humour and gossipy good fun'

18 April 2014 9:16 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

During his time as head of Screen One at the BBC, in 1991 I pitched Richard Broke a project called A Foreign Field, with an ageing cast that included Alec Guinness, Leo McKern, Lauren Bacall and Jeanne Moreau. "I'd better commission that now" said Richard, "or they'll all croak before we shoot it."

Throughout the production, in France and at Pinewood, Richard's impish humour and gossipy good fun sustained the whole cast and crew.

Continue reading »

- Martyn Auty

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Meet the 2014 Tribeca Filmmakers #32: Ilmar Raag Discovers the Russian Reality with 'I Won't Come Back'

15 April 2014 9:02 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Estonian filmmaker Ilmar Raag comes to Tribeca with "I Won't Come Back," a drama about a woman on the run. Known for "Love is Blind" and "A Lady in Paris," Raag returns to Russia to create a work he promises is "something that would get your heart beating."  Tell us about yourself? I probably did too many things before starting to make movies. I studied history, film economy, television in Estonia, in France and in the States. I worked as journalist and as television executive. It all took almost too long before I decided to do only things that I want to do. So, in a way, I started my life only in 2007 with the film "The Class". 5 years later I managed to release my second film "A Lady in Paris", shot in France with Jeanne Moreau. And only then I was ready for real adventures. Biggest challenge coming into the project? »

- Indiewire

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Is ‘Monuments Men’ Too Much a Mix of Art and Commerce?

27 February 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Memo: To George Clooney

Your Clooney movie machine is purring along smoothly, George, with “Gravity,” which you co-produced, poised to reap further largesse from the Oscars. You will shortly start “Tomorrowland,” a sci-fi megapic from director Brad Bird. And “Monuments Men” has opened to respectable numbers in the U.S., and aspires to stronger ones overseas.

But before we gloss over that last movie. … As a filmmaker who has feasted off worshipful reviews for most of your career, George, the critical whiplash that greeted “Monuments Men” surely took you by surprise. I hope so anyway, because this might be a good moment for you to reassess a key aspect of your filmmaking strategy.

The WWII-set film, which you wrote, directed and starred in, offers a compelling story, a noble message and an inspired cast. Trouble is, it’s a dark war movie haphazardly married to an unwieldy comedy caper. It »

- Peter Bart

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Film Review: ‘Ain’t Misbehavin”

17 February 2014 11:37 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In spanning eight decades, Marcel Ophuls’ filmed autobiography “Ain’t Misbehavin’” incorporates a wide array of approaches: nostalgia-filled interviews with celebrated contemporaries, whimsical excerpts from Hollywood films, samplings from his own and his father’s oeuvres, and jaunts to the sites of past traumas and triumphs. Ophuls obviously greatly relishes his role as cosmopolitan raconteur, but his spontaneous delivery can feel over-rehearsed, his focus erratic. Film buffs will doubtless appreciate his imaginative use of free-associative film clips and anecdotes about Preston Sturges, Marlene Dietrich and Francois Truffaut, but “Misbehavin’” ultimately seems too patchy to resonate with wider audiences.

Ophuls’ remembrance of his early life offers a nearly miraculous confluence of personal, cinematic and world history. As the son of famed German-Jewish director Max Ophuls, who left Germany for France and from there escaped to Hollywood, young Marcel found himself at the center of international film production as well as the Holocaust, »

- Ronnie Scheib

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Dallas Buyers Club, The Invisible Woman, RoboCop: this week's new films

7 February 2014 11:50 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Dallas Buyers Club | The Invisible Woman | RoboCop | Mr Peabody & Sherman | The Patrol | Lift To The Scaffold

Dallas Buyers Club (15)

(Jean-Marc Vallée, 2013, Us) Matthew McConaughey, Jennifer Garner, Jared Leto, Denis O'Hare, Steve Zahn. 117 mins

What McConaughey loses in body mass he gains in compassion in this drawn-from-real-life drama, which cleverly disguises its awards-friendliness beneath thespian commitment and non-issue-movie storytelling. Diagnosed with Aids in 1980s Texas, McConaughey's rodeo-loving electrician takes matters into his own hands and devises his own grey-market treatment programme for the ravaged gay community (in partnership with Leto's lovable transgender cohort, Rayon). The authorities don't approve; the Academy probably will.

The Invisible Woman (12A)

(Ralph Fiennes, 2013, UK) Ralph Fiennes, Felicity Jones, Kristin Scott-Thomas. 111 mins

Working to Claire Tomalin's biography, Fiennes gives us a tale of two Dickenses: the charismatic literary celebrity and the self-absorbed love rat. But the passion of his secret affair with Jones's teenage actor is smothered by repression, »

- Steve Rose

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New on Video: ‘Jules and Jim’

7 February 2014 6:39 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Jules and Jim

Directed by François Truffaut

Written by François Truffaut and Jean Gruault

France, 1962

In François Truffaut’s debut feature, The 400 Blows, widely seen as the flagship production of the French Nouvelle Vague, or “New Wave,” he was able to convey a representation of youth in a very specific era and, at that time, in a very unique way. Autobiographical as the 1959 film was, it also featured a notable vitality and honesty, two traits that would distinguish several of these French films from the late 1950s and into the ’60s. While The 400 Blows was an earnest and refreshing portrayal of adolescence, in some ways, Truffaut’s 1962 feature, Jules and Jim, his third, feels even more youthful, in terms of stylistic daring and energetic exuberance. Though dealing with adults and serious adult situations, Jules and Jim exhibits a formal sense of unbridled glee, with brisk editing, amusing asides, »

- Jeremy Carr

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Lift to the Scaffold (Ascenseur Pour L'Échafaud) – review

6 February 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Louis Malle's brash debut, now on rerelease, about a wealthy married woman who hatches a criminal plot is a brilliant, preposterous slice of noir suspense

Two years before Breathless, before Godard was talking about needing a girl and a gun, 26-year-old Louis Malle unveiled this brash debut: a brilliant, preposterous slice of noir-suspense realism and Highsmithian mistaken identity, imbued with the poetry of romantic despair, mostly voiced directly into the camera by Jeanne Moreau – a captivating kind of choric-fatale, with dark sensuous shadows under the eyes. She is a wealthy married woman, Mme Florence Cabala, who in this era when capital punishment (the "scaffold") was very much on France's statute book, hatches the imperfect crime with her lover, ex‑paratrooper Julien (Maurice Ronet). Chaotically, their paths cross with gamine florist's assistant, Véronique (Yori Bertin), and her teen boyfriend, Louis (Georges Poujouly). They are the younger generation, contemptuous of their »

- Peter Bradshaw

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'Jules and Jim' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

6 February 2014 10:14 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I don't remember the first time I watched Fran?ois Truffaut's Jules and Jim, but I remember appreciating it though not loving it. Watching it again on Criterion's new Blu-ray release (buy it here) I feel a greater level of respect, but the film almost feels clinical to me more than anything else. As Truffaut tells the story of a love triangle between Jules (Oskar Werner), Jim (Henri Serre) and the free-spirited Catherine (Jeanne Moreau) I couldn't help but feel that each scene is a masterclass in filmmaking, though almost to a fault. Frequently cited as one of the best films ever made, and I assume many would argue Truffaut's best film, though I'm sure admirers of The 400 Blows would beg to differ, Jules and Jim is an adaptation of Henri-Pierre Roche's novel, which Truffaut clearly adored as evidenced by the multitude of interview segments included on this disc. »

- Brad Brevet

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New DVD Blu-Ray: 'Dallas Buyers Club,' 'About Time,' 'Free Birds'

4 February 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week

"Dallas Buyers Club"

What's It About? Based on a true story, "Dbc" stars Matthew McConaughey as Ron Woodroof, a good old boy diagnosed with HIV and given 30 days to live. He begins importing non-fda approved drugs into the Us to treat himself and begins selling them to other people living with HIV as part of a buyers club. Jared Leto plays his business partner and friend Rayon, a transgender woman who also has HIV.

Why We're In: Although "Dbc" has been criticized for some of its more liberal interpretation of the facts, strong performances have earned this movie six Oscar nominations.

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week

"Jules and Jim" (Criterion)

What's It About? Two friends fall in love with the same woman, played by the legendary Jeanne Moreau, in this incredible French New Wave film by François Truffaut.

Why We're In: The movie »

- Jenni Miller

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Movie Review - Lift to the Scaffold (1958)

4 February 2014 8:09 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Lift to the Scaffold aka Elevator to the Gallows (France: Ascenseur pour l'échafaud), 1958.

Directed by Louis Malle.

Starring Jeanne Moreau, Maurice Ronet, Georges Poujouly, Jean Wall and Yori Bertin.

Synopsis:

A self-assured business man murders his employer, the husband of his adulterer, which unintentionally provokes an ill-fated chain of events.

The stuck-in-a-lift plot device grabs your attention. The opening action-sequence of Speed; Emilio Estevez’s short-lived role in Mission: Impossible and the Shyamalan-penned Devil. The claustrophobic, metallic space automatically creates a sense of urgency and tension. The silver-box, hanging by a taught, tight wire seems so fragile and yet it remains the spine of the modern skyscraper – who would walk up so many flights of stairs and remain, effortlessly cool?

Louis Malle’s Lift to the Scaffold exploits this plot-device in all its cool glory. Rather than exclusively set in and around the “lift to the scaffold”, Malle playfully charts »

- Gary Collinson

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Rerelease – Lift to the Scaffold Review

4 February 2014 8:00 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Rereleased this week, Louis Malle’s Lift to the Scaffold remains an enduring example of the invigorating cinema produced in France during the late 1950’s. A sophisticated noir, punctuated by a vivacious score courtesy of jazz legend Miles Davis, Lift to the Scaffold is teeming with the type of aesthetic and narrative innovations that would contribute to the future development of French cinema.

Ex-paratrooper Julien Tavernier (Maurice Ronet) is seen leaving his office, not conventionally through the door, but instead out of the window. Dexterously clambering up the side of the building like a cat burglar, he breaks into the office of Carala (Jean Wall) his boss and the husband of his lover Florence (Jeanne Moreau). Julian kills him with little fuss and sets about making the incident look like a suicide. However, whilst clambering into his car he realizes he has left a rope dangling out of the window. »

- Patrick Gamble

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'Dallas Buyers Club', 'Escape Plan' & 'About Time' On Blu-ray and DVD Today

4 February 2014 7:05 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Dallas Buyers Club Pretty solid week of new releases starting with one of the better films of 2013 and one we're sure to be talking about more leading up to the Oscars, Dallas Buyers Club featuring a pair of great performances from Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto and a strong performance from Jennifer Garner as well.

About Time Richard Curtis' About Time is one of the year's better romantic comedies along with the likes of Best Man Holiday. I'm sure there was at least one more, but those are the two that come to mind and with the unlikely pairing of Rachel McAdams and Domhnall Gleeson the movie comes as a nice little surprise. Oh, and it has The Wolf of Wall Street star Margot Robbie. So, that's a little bonus.

Jules and Jim (Criterion Collection) I still need to dig into this new Blu-ray edition of Francois Truffaut's Jules and Jim, »

- Brad Brevet

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Lift To The Scaffold is a glittering jewel of 50s French film-making

2 February 2014 11:50 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Louis Malle's classic contains many of the innovations that would become associated with the New Wave and demonstrates a kinship with Claude Chabrol

Is there any movie that's more perfectly French, more perfectly Parisian, and more perfectly 1950s than Louis Malle's debut Lift To The Scaffold? Melville's Bob Le Flambeur, perhaps, or Cocteau's Orphée, but there is also in Malle's movie a strong indication of the new directions French cinema would soon take. Although Malle was never officially a part of La Nouvelle Vague, Lift To The Scaffold contains many of the innovations that would later become more closely associated with the Cahiers du Cinéma generation.

This movie made Jeanne Moreau, whose iconic beauty was newly revealed here after Malle got her to ditch the makeup she'd hitherto relied on. She went on to become one of the banner faces of the New Wave, most famously for Truffaut in Jules Et Jim, »

- John Patterson

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Review: Truffaut's "Jules And Jim" Criterion Blu-ray/DVD Dual Disc Release

1 February 2014 3:01 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

“Truffaut’s Gift”

By Raymond Benson

It’s not only my favorite Francois Truffaut film, but it’s also my favorite French New Wave picture. While Godard’s Breathless is often cited as the quintessential French New Wave movie—and it is indeed a hallmark of the movement—for me it’s Jules and Jim that fully represents that important development in cinema history. It contains all the recognizable stylistic and thematic qualities that those French upstarts brought to their films (what? French critics becoming filmmakers? How dare they!), but it’s also a darned good story with wonderful performances by its three leads. And while the movie ends on a bittersweet, somewhat tragic note, Jules and Jim is really a feel-good movie because of the way Truffaut chose to tell the tale. The director has never shied away from pathos and sentimentality—something the filmmaker was very good at »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Campion named president of the 2014 Cannes jury

7 January 2014 4:37 PM, PST | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Acclaimed New Zealand director, producer and screenwriter Jane Campion will succeed Steven Spielberg in presiding the Jury of the 2014 Festival de Cannes, it was announced yesterday. Campion has long been involved with the Festival, starting with her first attendance in 1986. .Since I first went to Cannes with my short films in 1986, I have had the opportunity to see the festival from many sides and my admiration for this Queen of film festivals has only grown larger. At the Cannes Film Festival they manage to combine and celebrate the glamour of the industry, the stars, the parties, the beaches, the business, while rigorously maintaining the festival's seriousness about the Art and excellence of new world cinema,. Campion said in the announcement published on the Cannes website. Campion is also the only female director to have won the Palme d.or for The Piano in 1993, adding to her 1986 Short Film Palme d.or for Peel. »

- Emily Blatchford

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Jane Campion named head of Cannes jury

7 January 2014 6:38 AM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Jane Campion, who remains the only female director to win the Palme d’or (for 1993′s The Piano), will head the jury at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. ” is a mythical and exciting festival where amazing things can happen, actors are discovered, films are financed, careers are made,” said Campion. “I know this because that is what happened to me!”

“We are immensely proud that Jane Campion has accepted our invitation,” said Thierry Frémaux, Cannes’ general delegate. “Following on from Michèle Morgan, Jeanne Moreau, Françoise Sagan, Isabelle Adjani, Liv Ullmann and Isabelle Huppert in 2009, she is the latest distinguished »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Jane Campion named president of Cannes Film Festival 2014 jury

7 January 2014 2:50 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Jane Campion has been announced as the president of the jury of the next Cannes Film Festival.

The New Zealand-born director, screenwriter and producer succeeds Steven Spielberg in the role for this year's event, which takes place from May 14 to 25.

"Since I first went to Cannes with my short films in 1986 I have had the opportunity to see the festival from many sides and my admiration for this queen of film festivals has only grown larger," Campion said.

"At the Cannes Film Festival they manage to combine and celebrate the glamour of the industry, the stars, the parties, the beaches, the business, while rigorously maintaining the festival's seriousness about the art and excellence of new world cinema."

She added: "It is this world wide inclusiveness and passion for film at the heart of the festival which makes the importance of the Cannes Film Festival indisputable.

"It is a mythical and »

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Jane Campion to head Cannes 2014 Jury

6 January 2014 10:28 PM, PST | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

New Zealand director, producer and scriptwriter Jane Campion will preside over the Jury of the 67th Festival de Cannes, which will take place from 14 to 25 May 2014.

Campion said, “Since I first went to Cannes with my short films in 1986, I have had the opportunity to see the festival from many sides and my admiration for this Queen of film festivals has only grown larger. At the Cannes Film Festival they manage to combine and celebrate the glamour of the industry, the stars, the parties, the beaches, the business, while rigorously maintaining the festival’s seriousness about the Art and excellence of new world cinema.”

Jane Campion is the only female director to have won the Palme d’Or, for The Piano in 1993 and the Short Film Palme d’Or back in 1986 for Peel.

Thierry Frémaux, Cannes Delegate General, said: “We are immensely proud that Jane Campion has accepted our invitation. »

- NewsDesk

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Jane Campion Is The President of the 2014 Cannes Film Festival Jury

6 January 2014 9:53 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jane Campion has been announced as the jury president of the 67th Cannes Film Festival, running May 14-25, 2014. The unusually early announcement (last year it came at the end of February when Steven Spielberg was set as president) makes Campion the first female jury president since Isabelle Huppert in 2009, and the 10th in the festival's history (following Huppert, Olivia de Havilland, Sophia Loren, Michèle Morgan, Françoise Sagan, Ingrid Bergman, Jeanne Moreau, Liv Ullmann and Isabelle Adjani). Campion, notably, is the only female director to ever win the Palme d'Or at Cannes. Full press release below: The New Zealand director, producer and scriptwriter Jane Campion is to preside the Jury of the next Festival de Cannes, which will take place from 14 to 25 May 2014. "Since I first went to Cannes with my short films in 1986 – Campion says - I have had the opportunity to see the festival from many sides and my »

- Peter Knegt

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

1-20 of 22 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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