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Japan Lets Out ‘Bathwater’ as Oscar Contender

“Her Love Boils Bathwater” has been selected as Japan’s contender for the foreign language film Oscar.

Directed by Ryota Nakano, the film is drama about a terminally ill woman’s determination to put her affairs in order and set her daughter on the right path. This is a first-time Academy Awards race selection for Nakano, whose only previous feature was the 2013 family drama “Capturing Dad.”

Released in Japan in October of last year, with Klockworx distributing, the film won an array of Japanese awards. Among its six Japan Academy prizes were best picture, best director and best actress honors, the last going to lead Rie Miyazawa.

The nomination was selected by a committee under the auspices of the Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan.

Related storiesInternational Newswire: Finland Selects 'Tom of Finland' as Oscar EntryJapan Box Office: 'Sekigahara' Wins Second WeekendKorea Hails 'A Taxi Driver' For Oscar Race
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Oscars: Japan Selects 'Her Love Boils Bathwater' for Foreign-Language Category

Japan's entry for the foreign-language category at the Oscars is Ryota Nakano's Her Love Boils Bathwater (Yu o Wakasu Hodo no Atsui Ai).

Written and directed by Nakano, it tells the story of a mother who decides to resolve all her family's problems after she is diagnosed with terminal cancer. Rie Miyazawa won the Japan Academy Prize for best actress for her performance, while Hana Sugsaki won best supporting actress for her portrayal of Miyazawa's daughter. The film lost out to Godzilla Resurgence for best picture.

Japan first won the foreign-language Oscar in 1951 with Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon and last...
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40th Japanese Academy Awards

The ceremony took place in the Grand Prince Hotel, in Tokyo, on the 3d of March and the winners were:

Best Picture: Godzilla Resurgence (Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi)

Best Animated Film: In this corner of the World (Sunao Katabuchi)

Best Director: Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi (Godzilla Resurgence)

Best Screenplay: Makoto Shinkai (Your Name)

Best Actor: Koichi Sato (64: Part I)

Best Actress: Rie Miyazawa (Her Love Boils Water)

Best Supporting Actor: Satoshi Tsumabaki (Rage)

Best Supporting Actress: Hana Sugisaki (Her Love Boils Water)

Best Cinematography: Kosuke Yamada (Godzilla Resurgence)

Best Lighting Direction: Takayuki Kawabe (Godzilla Resurgence)

Best Music: Radwimps (Your Name)

Best Art Direction: Yuji Hayashida & Eri Sakujima (Godzilla Resurgence)

Best Sound Recording: Jun Nakamura & Haru Yamada (Godzilla Resurgence)

Best Film Editing: Hideaki Anno and Atsuki Sato (Godzilla Resurgence)

Best Foreign Language Film: Sully

Newcomer of the Year: Hana Sugisaki (Her Love Boils Bathwater), Mitsuki Takahata (Evergreen Love,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘Shin Godzilla’ Takes Seven Japan Academy Prizes

‘Shin Godzilla’ Takes Seven Japan Academy Prizes
Shin Godzilla,” a CGI-heavy reboot of the iconic Godzilla series, took seven Japan Academy prizes at the awards ceremony in Tokyo on Friday, the most of any of the nominees. The film, which earned $72 million at the Japanese box office last year, scooped best picture and best director honors for co-directors Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi, who brought Toho’s signature series back to the screen after a 12-year hiatus.

The best actor prize went to Koichi Sato for his turn as a police public relations officer haunted by a long-ago murder case in Takahisa Zeze mystery/thriller “64.” Rie Miyazawa received the best actress trophy for her portrayal of a mother dying of terminal cancer in the Ryota Nakano drama “Her Love Boils Bathwater.’

The year’s biggest hit, animation “Your Name,” won awards for best script and music, as well as the most popular film prize. Best animation honors,
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Newswire: The Japanese Academy Awards named Shin Godzilla last year’s best movie

  • The AV Club
We’re on the record as thinking that Toho’s most recent Godzilla flick, Shin Godzilla, was a pretty good time, blending political satire and smashing buildings into one city-stomping package. But given that we gave the movie a B, we might still be out of step with the Japanese Academy Prize’s assessment of the film. The Prize—often referred to as the Japanese Academy Awards—named Shin Godzilla (also known as Godzilla: Resurgence) its Best Picture of 2016 today, along with six other awards, including Best Director.

Godzilla stomped all over the night’s second place finisher, the critically acclaimed anime film Your Name. Other films up for contention at this year’s awards included Rage, What A Wonderful Family!, and Her Love Boils Bathwater, which earned a Best Actress award for star Rie Miyazawa.

[via The Hollywood Reporter]
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90th Kinema Junpo Awards

The award ceremony for the oldest Japanese cinema competition took place on February 5 at the Bunkyo Civic Center, and the list of winners is:

Best Actor: Yuya Yagira (Destruction Babies)

Best Actress: Rie Miyazawa (Her Love Boils Bath Water)

Best Supporting Actor: Pistol Takehara (The Long Excuse)

Best Supporting Actress: Hana Sugisaki (Her Love Boils Bath Water)

Best Director: Sunao Katabuchi (In This Corner of the World)

Best Director (Foreign): Clint Eastwood (Sully)

Best Screenplay: Hideaki Anno (Shin Godzilla)

Best New Actor: Nijiro Murakami (Destruction Babies, Natsumi no Hotaru)

Best New Actress: Nana Komatsu (Oboreru Knife, Destruction Babies)

Best Ten Japanese Feature Films

In This Corner of the World (Sunao Katabuchi)

Shin Godzilla (Shinji Higuchi/Hideaki Anno)

Harmonium (Koji Fukada)

Destruction Babies (Mariko Tetsuya)

Long Excuse (Miwa Nishikawa)

The Bride of Rip Van Winkle (Shunji Iwai)

Her Love Boils Bath Water (Ryota Nakano)

Creepy (Kiyoshi Kurosawa)

Over the Fence
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29th Nikkan Sports Film Awards

The 29th ceremony took place on December, 28 at the New Otani Hotel, in Tokyo and the list of winners is:

Best Film: 64: Part 1 (Takahisa Zeze)

Best Director: Makoto Shinkai (Your Anme)

Best Actor: Koichi Sato (64: Part 1)

Best Actress: Rie Miyazawa (Her Love Boils Bathwater )

Best Supporting Actor: Satoshi Tsumabuki (Rage, Museum)

Best Supporting Actress: Aoi Miyazaki (Rage, If Cats Disappeared from the World)

Best International Film: Spotlight (Tom McCarthy)

New Face Award: Kasumi Arimura (Nanimono, Natsumi’s Firefly)

Yujiro Ishihara Award: Dangerous Cops: Final 5 Days (Toru Murakawa)

Toru Murakawa Kasumi Arimura Rie Miyazawa
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41th Hochi Film Awards

The awards were first presented in 1976, from the sports newspaper Hochi Shinbun, currently named Sports Hochi. The voters include readers of the newspaper and a committee of Japanese film critics.

This year’s ceremony was held on December 20th, at Prince Park Hotel, in Tokyo, and the winners were:

Best Picture: Her Love Boils Bathwater (Ryota Nakano)

Best International Picture: Creed (Ryan Coogler)

Best Actor: Tomokazu Miura (Katsuragi Case)

Best Actress: Rie Miyazawa (Her Love Boils Bathwater)

Best Supporting Actor: Go Ayano (Rage)

Best Supporting Actress: Hana Sugisaki (Her Love Boils Bathwater)

Best New Artist: Takanori Iwata (Evergreen Love) Ryota Nakano (Her Love Boils Bathwater)

Special Award: Your Name

Best Director: Lee Sang-il (Rage)
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

'Blind Massage' wins best film at Asian Film Awards

  • ScreenDaily
'Blind Massage' wins best film at Asian Film Awards
Lou Ye’s Blind Massage won best film at the Asian Film Awards in Macau on Tuesday night, while Ann Hui won best director for The Golden Era.

Hui’s biopic of writer Xiao Hong also picked up best supporting actor for Wang Zhiwen’s performance, while Blind Massage also won best cinematography for the work of Zeng Jian.

Liao Fan (pictured at left) was awarded best actor for Diao Yinan’s Black Coal, Thin Ice, which also won best screenwriter for Diao’s script.

Best actress went to Korea’s Bae Doo-na (pictured at right) for A Girl At My Door, while Japan’s Ikewaki Chizuru won best supporting actress for The Light Shines Only There. The best newcomer went to Zhang Huiwen for her role in Zhang Yimou’s Coming Home.

Jiang Wen’s Gone With The Bullets was a multiple winner in the technical categories, picking up best VFX (Rick Sander and Christoph Zollinger
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‘The Eternal Zero’ Takes Eight Japan Academy Awards

Tokyo — Takashi Yamazaki’s controversial World War II kamikaze drama “The Eternal Zero” swept eight Japan Academy prizes at the 38th awards ceremony, held at a Tokyo hotel Friday evening.

Based on a novel by outspoken nationalist author Naoki Hyakuta, the film tells the story of a skilled veteran pilot (Junichi Okada) of the famed Zero fighter plane who is reviled by some of his comrades for wanting to finish the war alive, but changes his mind once he begins instructing young pilots destined for one-way suicide flights. The film was the biggest live-action hit of 2014, earning $68 million (8.1 billion yen).

“The Eternal Zero” won Picture of the Year honors and Yamazaki was named best director.

Meanwhile, star Okada received the best actor award, as well as a best supporting actor prize for his work in the Takashi Koizumi period drama “A Samurai Chronicle.” He is the first male actor to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Japan Box Office: Local Films ‘As The Gods Will,’ ‘Pale Moon’ Win Weekend

Tokyo – “As the Gods Will,” Miike Takashi’s blood-spattered shocker about teens forced to play a deadly game, opened atop the Japanese B.O. for the Nov. 15-16 weekend.

Bowing on 318 screens, the pic earned $1.54 million on 134,000 admissions and is expected to finish north of $10 million.

Debuting at number two on 260 screens was “Pale Moon,” Daihachi Yoshida’s drama about a middle-aged bank employee who embezzles to support her young lover. Boosted by star Rie Miyazawa’s best actress prize at the recently ended Tokyo festival, the film took $1.14 million on 104,000 admissions and is also tipped for a $10 million plus total.

Their debuts meant that there was no Hollywood film in the top five. “Expendables 3” slipped to sixth spot.

The only other new addition to the top ten was the Seiji Mizushima animation “Expelled from Paradise,” which entered at number nine with $250,000 from 17,300 admissions on 13

screens.

Among art house openers
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Tokyo Film Festival Review: Audience Award Winner ‘Pale Moon’

  • The Playlist
As the only Japanese film playing in competition at the Tokyo International Film Festival, expectations were high and goodwill primed to cheer the root-of-all-evil tale “Pale Moon” as the local find of the week. And it just scooped the Audience Award, having earned at least mild praise from most critics, so really the only kink in that narrative is us, contrarians that we are. "Pale Moon," the fourth feature from director Daihachi Yoshida, is certainly more slickly made than some of the other competition titles here. It boasts a locally well-known lead in stage and screen actress Rie Miyazawa, plus a springy, culturally and temporally relevant-feeling plot about the corrupting lure of money. But it is also a remarkably plodding telling of a familiar story, one that unfolds in so linear a fashion that it feels oddly overexplained, only ever operating on a single level, entirely without subtext or subplot.
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Heaven Knows What takes top Tokyo prize

  • ScreenDaily
Heaven Knows What takes top Tokyo prize
Audience Award won by Pale Moon with the film’s Rie Miyazawa named best actress.

The 27th Tokyo International Film Festival (Tiff) wrapped tonight with Josh and Benny Safdie’s Us-France co-production Heaven Knows What winning the Tokyo Grand Prix. The top award comes with a cash prize of $50,000.

The co-directors also took Award for Best Director ($5,000) with their film about young junkies struggling to survive in New York. Heaven Knows What was an Asian premiere in Tokyo after Venice, Toronto and New York.

The Special Jury Prize ($20,000) went to Bulgaria-Greece co-production The Lesson directed by Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov.

Rie Miyazawa took the Best Actress award ($5,000) for her performance in Pale Moon, a world premiere title which also picked up the Audience Award ($10,000).

Directed by Daihachi Yoshida (The Kirishima Thing), the film was the only Japanese work in competition and drew pleased buzz from hard-pressed festival-goers looking for good Japanese films in the selection.

[link
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‘Heaven Knows What’ Wins Top Tokyo Prize, Japan’s ‘Pale Moon’ Takes Audience Award

‘Heaven Knows What’ Wins Top Tokyo Prize, Japan’s ‘Pale Moon’ Takes Audience Award
Tokyo — Joshua and Benny Safdie’s gritty New York drug scene drama “Heaven Knows What” was awarded the Tokyo Grand Prix on Friday at the closing ceremony of the Tokyo International Film Festival’s 27th edition, which unspooled Oct. 23-31.

Jury head, James Gunn said “I loved the movie and I’m excited about the futures of all the filmmakers involved with it.” The two Safdies also scooped the best director award.

The special jury prize went to “The Lesson,” a drama about a teacher in a Bulgarian elementary school by another directing duo, Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov.

The winner of the best actor prize was Robert Wieckiewicz, who played an alcoholic writer in Polish director Wojtek Smarzowski’s “The Mighty Angel,” while the best actress award went to Rie Miyazawa for her turn as an embezzling bank employee in Daihachi Yoshida’s “Pale Moon.” The film, the only
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Pale Moon': Tokyo Review

Going from strength to strength, director Yoshida Daihachi (The Kirishima Thing) returns to the themes of conformity and rebellion in Japanese society in Pale Moon (Kami no Tsuki), the story of an obedient housewife who becomes an embezzler to live it up with a young lover. Though seemingly played for straight drama, there are mischievous clues throughout the film that other readings are possible, confirmed in the surprise ending. The fun — and anxiety — lies in watching the delightfully proper heroine overturn the conventions of a highly regimented country, and stage and screen actress Rie Miyazawa is fully up

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tokyo Intl. Film Festival Kicks Off with Gala Premiere of ‘Big Hero 6′

Tokyo Intl. Film Festival Kicks Off with Gala Premiere of ‘Big Hero 6′
Tokyo — The 27th edition of the Tokyo International Film Festival kicked off on Thursday with a gala opening at the Roppongi Hills entertainment and shopping complex.

The red carpet was trod by nearly 370 fests guests and celebs, including Rie Miyazawa, star of the competition’s only Japanese pic, the Daihachi Yoshida embezzlement drama “Pale Moon,” and Miki Nakatani, serving as the fest’s “navigator,” or spokeswoman, though she is a major star in her own right. Getting by far the loudest screams from the crowd, however, was the five-member boy band Arashi, who made a surprise appearance as reps of the government’s “Cool Japan” initiative.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appeared on stage at the Toho Cinemas Roppongi Hills main theater prior to world premiere screening of opening film “Big Hero 6.” Saying that he could feel by the “fever in the air” that the fest was beginning, he added,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tokyo Festival Opens With Pomp, Prime Minister and Hints of Levity

Tokyo Festival Opens With Pomp, Prime Minister and Hints of Levity
Tokyo — The 27th running of the Tokyo International Film Festival got under way Thursday with pomp and circumstance – and just the right degree of levity.

The opening ceremony in the Roppongi Hills complex was attended by a Japanese princess, two ministers and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, as well as a coterie of international guests.

In a speech without notes, Abe identified detailed elements of the festival program, pitched Tokyo as a gateway to Asian cinema, and personally welcomed U.S. animation icon John Lasseter. He also repeated the country’s ‘Cool Japan’ culture and tourism pitch and joshed with five part boy-band Arashi, who were dressed like the Pm in sharp, dark suits. “I hope some of their popularity rubs off on the government,” he said.

In a city they obviously admire, the directing and production team from opening film “Big Hero 6” gushed their thanks and wonderment at being part of the opening event.
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Tokyo Intl. Film Fest Unveils Competition Section, New Samurai Award

Tokyo — The Tokyo International Film Festival unveiled its lineup for its 27th edition, unspooling Oct. 23-31, at a presser today in Tokyo.

The 15-film Competition section includes five world premieres, nine Asian premieres and one international premiere, with several pick-ups from Toronto: Bent Hamer’s Norwegian Oscar nominee drama “1001 Grams,” Cedric Jimenez’s crime thriller “The Connection,” Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov’s school drama “The Lesson” and Joshua and Benny Safdie’s New York drug scene drama “Heaven Knows What.” Also competing for the Tokyo Sakura Grand Prix, the fest’s highest award, are Claudio Noce’s suspenser “Ice Forest,” which premiered at Rome, as well as Nima Javidi’s directorial debut “Melbourne” and Elchin Musaoglu’s “Nabat,” both of which screened at Venice. The only Japanese pic in the section is Daihachi Yoshida’s “Pale Moon,” which stars Rie Miyazawa as a housewife who turns embezzler.

The Competition
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‘1001 Grams’ and ‘Heaven Knows What’ Head Tokyo Festival Competition

Tokyo — The Tokyo International Film Festival unveiled a 15-film competition section with five world premieres and a strong contingent of films from other autumn festivals.

Pick-ups from Toronto include Bent Hamer’s Norwegian Oscar contender, drama “1001 Grams,” Cedric Jimenez’s crime thriller “The Connection,” Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov’s school drama “The Lesson,” and Joshua and Benny Safdie’s New York drug scene drama “Heaven Knows What.”

Also competing for the Tokyo Sakura Grand Prix, the festival’s highest award, are Claudio Noce’s suspense picture “Ice Forest,” which premieres at Rome, as well as Nima Javidi’s directorial debut “Melbourne” and Elchin Musaoglu’s “Nabat,” both of which screened at Venice . The only Japanese title in the section is Daihachi Yoshida’s previously announced “Pale Moon,” which stars Rie Miyazawa as a housewife who turns embezzler.

The competition jury will be headed by “Guardians of the Galaxy” director James Gunn,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

One Japanese film in Tokyo competition

  • ScreenDaily
In an early announcement, the 27th Tokyo International Film Festival (Tiff) has revealed Japanese film Pale Moon will be the only local film in Competition this year.

Directed by Daihachi Yoshida, award-winning filmmaker of The Kirishima Thing, Pale Moon will receive its world premiere at the festival, which runs Oct 23-31.

The rest of Tiff’s line-up will be announced Sept 30.

Based on prize-winning author Mitsuyo Kakuta’s novel The Eighth Day, suspense film Pale Moon stars Rie Miyazawa as an ordinary housewife who unexpectedly gets involved in a large embezzlement case.

Yoshi Yatabe, programming director of Tiff’s International Competition section, said: “It was fate when the director Daihachi Yoshida, who is always careful to portray a character attractively, encountered the actress Rie Miyazawa.

“In Pale Moon, Miyazawa performed perfectly in the role of a woman who experiences liberation from suppression and downfall. The chemistry between the director and the star created this year’s representative
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