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1-20 of 48 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Studio Ghibli: Watch A Two-Hour Concert Of Their Greatest Film Scores Conducted by Joe Hisaishi

20 July 2016 10:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Since 1985, the Japanese animation studio Studio Ghibli is known for producing some of the most critically acclaimed, highest-quality animated films. Their output includes the films of Hayao Miyazaki, whose films like “My Neighbor Totoro” and “Spirited Away” have entered the cultural consciousness, as well as work by director Isao Takahta, whose most recent film “The Tale of the Princess Kaguya” was recently nominated for an Oscar. Studio Ghibli’s dedicated approach towards their craft promises the best in animation, but one element of their films that goes largely unnoticed are their scores.

Read More: Cannes Review: Studio Ghibli-Produced ‘The Red Turtle’ is a Quiet Little Masterpiece

In 2009, Joe Hisaishi, composer of a majority of Ghibli films, held a concert to celebrate the release of Miyazaki’s “Ponyo” and the 25 years of collaboration between the two ever since 1984’s “Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind,” whose success led to the creation of Ghibli. »

- Kyle Kizu

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39 years ago today: Comic-Con welcomed stormtroopers to the nerd Mecca for the first time

20 July 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Today, thousands upon thousands of fanboys and fangirls will flock toward Southern California as San Diego Comic-Con kicks off. 39 years ago today, the then-much smaller convention opened for a significant year: The first after the release of Star Wars. Though the con was still focused on comic books at the time and was contained within Sd’s El Cortez Hotel, the 1977 event did feature a “Making of Star Wars” panel. A year prior, Lucasfilm had drummed up a bit of anticipation for the movie at Comic-Con with Mark Hamill in attendance. Other notable July 20 happenings in pop culture history: • 1950: The Men, Marlon Brando’s first film, premiered in New York. • 1965: Bob Dylan’s single “Like a Rolling Stone” was released. • 1969: Broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience, Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, proclaiming the event “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. »

- Emily Rome

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The Best Movies of the 21st Century, According to IndieWire’s Film Critics

25 June 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s one thing to come up with a top 10 list of the best movies in any given year. The best movies of the decade is even harder. But the best movies of a century? Ok, when it comes to the new millennium, that’s just a decade and a half. Still, it’s no easy task to consider the highlights from 16 years of viewing — but that’s part of what makes it such a compelling challenge.

Recently, BBC polled a large group of critics, including IndieWire’s Eric Kohn and David Ehrlich, for their lists of the best achievements of the 21st century. (The full results will run in mid-to-late August.) The results of the poll have yet to run, but as countless participants have begun sharing their results, we felt compelled to weigh in. Of course, lists are highly subjective and almost always omit some major titles, so »

- Eric Kohn and David Ehrlich

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Studio Ghibli Animator Makiko Futaki: A Tribute

24 June 2016 3:10 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After Studio Ghibli veteran Makiko Futaki died in May, Pixar’s animator-director Peter Sohn (“The Good Dinosaur”) agreed to write a tribute and discovered a personal style in re-examining her work.

Makiko Futaki lived a life of animation. She worked on films from Katsuhiro Otomo’s “Akira” to Hayao Miyazaki’s “Howl’s Moving Castle.”

To be honest, I did not know her work until I had heard of her unfortunate passing in May at the young age of 57. Her list of film credits were jaw dropping. She had injected her talent into many of the greatest films of all time.

Animation can be an invisible art form because it is so collaborative. It is sometimes hard to discern which animator animated what scene in a particular film, but after watching several films an animator drew moments for, one can begin to see a personal style.

In Miyazaki’s “Laputa, »

- Bill Desowitz

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Animatsu Picks Up Rights On ‘Corner’

16 June 2016 11:30 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annecy  — London-based Animatsu Entertainment, a new U.K. anime production, distribution and sales company has taken global rights to “In This Corner of the World,” (aka “To All the Corners of This World”).

“Corner” was presented in a Work in Progress session at Annecy on Thursday 16. The third feature from director and scriptwriter Sunao Katabuchi, “Corner” is produced by Genco’s Taro Maki, producer of TV skein “Mobile Police Patlabor,” “Nodame Cantabile,” and “Sword Art Online,” as well as Mappa studio, founded by Masao Maruyama. President and later chief creative officer at prestigious Japanese studio Madhouse until 2011, Maruyama produced “Kids on the Slope” and “Terror in Resonance,” among many other TV series.

Katabuchi (“Mai Mai Miracle”) began his career with Oscar-winning animation helmer Hayao Miyazaki as a writer on his celebrated “Sherlock Holmes” TV series. He later served as assistant director on Miyazaki’s “Kiki’s Delivery Service.”

“In This »

- Emilio Mayorga

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The 50 Best Animated Films of the 21st Century Thus Far

16 June 2016 11:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There’s something inherently remarkable about the field of animation: that, with just a paper and pen, one can use infinite imagination to create a world unbound by physical restrictions. Of course, in today’s age it goes far beyond those simple tools of creation, but it remains the rare patience-requisite medium in which a director’s vision can be perfected over years until applying that final, necessary touch.

With Pixar’s 17th feature arriving in theaters, we’ve set out to reflect on the millennium thus far in animation and those films that have most excelled. In picking our 50 favorite titles, we looked to all corners of the world, from teams as big as thousands down to a sole animator. The result is a wide-ranging selection, proving that even if some animation styles aren’t as prevalent, the best examples find their way to the top.

To note: we only stuck with feature-length animations of 60 minutes or longer — sorry, World of Tomorrow, and even Pixar’s stunning Piper — and to make room for a few more titles, our definition of “the 21st century” stretched to include 2000. We also stuck with films that don’t feature any live-action (for the most part) and that have been released in the U.S. thus far, so The Red Turtle and Phantom Boy will get their due on a later date. Check out our top 50 below and let us know your favorites in the comments.

50. The Lego Movie (Phil Lord and Christopher Miller)

Admit it: When The Lego Movie was announced, you did not expect it to wind up any best-of-the-year lists. But, against all odds, Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s first smash hit of 2014 is an unadulterated pleasure. This bold, original film has a wildly clever script (by the directors) with a message of creativity that made it a glorious surprise. It is also well-cast: Lego is the first movie to fully make use of Chris Pratt’s essential sweetness, and offered Elizabeth Banks, Will Ferrell, Liam Neeson, and Morgan Freeman their freshest parts in years. It is not often that a “kids” film entertains adults as much as their children, but The Lego Movie is far more than a piece of entertainment for the young ones. What could have been a headache-inducing, cynical creation is instead a pop treat. Everything is, indeed, awesome. – Christopher Schobert

49. 5 Centimetres per Second (Makoto Shinkai)

Makoto Shinkai’s emotional tour de force is the embodiment of the Japanese term “mono no aware,” which describes a wistful awareness of life’s transience. In the way its characters are haunted by bygone moments in the face of a vast and shapeless future, 5 Centimetres per Second could function as a spiritual companion to the oeuvre of Wong Kar-wai, but whereas Wong’s lovelorn protagonists are stuck in the past, Shinkai’s move forward, steadily, in a state of melancholic acceptance. Time is itself a character here, a fact brought to our attention by shots of clocks, the evolution of technology alongside the characters’ aging, and scenes where narrative stakes ensure that the passing of each second is palpably felt. And yet it is precisely the ephemerality of these seconds that lends them elevated significance —fittingly, the film’s animation is breathtakingly detailed and tactile, allowing us to identify with the characters by having us inhabit each, vivid moment before it vanishes. – Jonah Jeng

48. The Adventures of Tintin (Steven Spielberg)

Leave it to Steven Spielberg to eke more thrills out of an animated feature than most directors could with every live-action tool at their disposal. The Adventures of Tintin is colored and paced like a child’s fantastical imagining of how Hergé’s comics might play in motion, and the extent to which viewers buy it depends largely on their willingness to give themselves over to narrative and technical flights of fancy. Me? Four-and-a-half years later, I’m still waiting for a follow-up with bated breath. – Nick Newman

47. Titan A.E. (Don Bluth, Gary Goldman and Art Vitello)

It’s the movie that took down Don Bluth, netted Fox a $100 million loss, and starred the young voices of Matt Damon and Drew Barrymore. From a script by Joss Whedon, John August, and Ben Edlund, Titan A.E. is a swashbuckle-y tale with stirring visuals and moments of sheer originality that now feels like a more-accomplished precursor to something such as Guardians of the Galaxy. If you’re going to go down, this is an impressive picture to sink with. – Dan Mecca

46. Metropolis (Rintaro)

Metropolis has more than a little in common with the apocalyptic orgy of violence of 1988 anime touchstone Akira, as the story follows the tragic inevitability of mans’ relationship with overwhelming power. But Rintaro’s Metropolis — which is based on Osama Tezuka’s manga and Fritz Lang’s canonical film — is also a story of overwhelming kindness in its central relationship between Kenichi, a well-intentioned and naïve child, and Tima, a cyborg capable of immense destruction. Distinguished by its washed-out watercolor character designs and its inventive cast of characters, Metropolis is a distinctly lighter take on the characteristically dreary dystopia genre. – Michael Snydel

45. Song of the Sea (Tomm Moore)

Animation has never shied away from grief. It’s the bedrock of everything from Grave of the Fireflies to the majority of Pixar’s filmography, but it’s rarely been as unbearably beautiful as in 2014’s unfairly overlooked Song of the Sea. Animated with a mythic tableau style, steeped in Celtic folklore, and filled with a cast of characters worthy of Hayao Miyazaki, Tomm Moore’s work is the rare heartwarming family film that knows it doesn’t need to compromise genuine emotion with fake-outs or Hollywood endings. – Michael Snydel

44. The Secret World of Arrietty (Hiromasa Yonebayashi)

While much of Studio Ghibli’s popularity focuses on the adored writer-director Hayao Miyazaki, some works from other directors deserve equal praise. One of them — which, yes, cheats a bit because Miyazaki scripted it — is The Secret World of Arrietty by first-time helmer Hiromasa Yonebayashi. The film follows a little boy’s fascination with the Borrowers — small humans that live in our world — and weaves the story of him and his family with Arrietty, one of the Borrowers. There are intensely dramatic moments as the Borrowers are constantly striving to survive amidst this world of luxury and easy life that the larger humans enjoy. Much like some of the best of Ghibli’s work, the film works on multiple levels and layers and thus becomes one of the studio’s most beautiful, enjoyable, and enduring works. – Bill Graham

43. ParaNorman (Chris Butler and Sam Fell)

A story of bullies and the bullied, Laika Studios’ second stop-motion film, ParaNorman, was unfortunately overshadowed by their astounding previous effort, Coraline. But time has been kind, and ParaNorman feels ahead of its time in both the exploration of darker themes (witch hunts, child murder, bigotry) and its juxtaposition of a Puritan New England ghost story and a vividly supernatural present. Buoyed by Jon Brion’s characteristically thoughtful score and an inventive reconfiguration of horror movie iconography, ParaNorman is a coming-of-age story that recognizes that even the “bad guys” have their reasons. – Michael Snydel

42. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit (Nick Park and Steve Box)

Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit, Aardman Animation’s second feature collaboration with DreamWorks, brings Nick Park‘s brilliant claymation series about an absentminded inventor and his mute canine companion to the big screen. Working as humane pest removal specialists, Wallace and Gromit have hatched a plan to brainwash every hungry rabbit in town to dislike vegetables, preventing Gromit’s prized melon from being ruthlessly devoured. But the experiment backfires and the Were-Rabbit, a monstrous beast with an unquenchable appetite for veggies, is unleashed on the lush gardens of Tottington Holl. On par with the most uproarious shorts of Park’s career (working this time out with co-director Steve Box), the film slyly evokes fond memories of Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein in never treating its goofy leads as seriously as its surprisingly effective scares. It’s a shame that Park has announced the titular duo are likely retired, due to the failing health of voice actor Peter Sallis. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit is a light-hearted and whimsically clever gem that also works as a charming introduction to the horror genre for young cinema-lovers. – Tony Hinds

41. Lilo & Stitch (Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois)

What other film can pull off starting with an all-out sci-fi adventure and transition into a heartful ode to culture and family? Before they delivered an even more impactful variation on a similar sort of creature-human bond with How to Train Your DragonChris Sanders and Dean DeBlois created this touching tale. Featuring a return to watercolor-painted backgrounds for Disney, as well as a reliance on 2D animation, it’s one of the company’s last in this era to have that long-missed tangibility. As often repeated in the film, “Family means nobody gets left behind,” and, by the end credits, you’ll feel like you’ve added a few new members to your own. – Jordan Raup

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- The Film Stage

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Annecy: Peru’s Origami Explores Andean Mythology in ‘Nuna’

15 June 2016 11:23 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lima-based Origami Studio is boarding Jimy Carhuas’ animated family feature “Nuna: The Last Myth of the Wamany,” a pioneering 2D tech toon pic project for Peru, selected to be pitched at Annecy‘s Mifa market.

Produced by Ciela Prado and Carhuas, also script co-authors, “Nuna” proposes an animated journey exploring the Andean worldview through mythological characters. It’s influenced by the aesthetics of Japanese animation maestro Hayao Miyazaki.

The script follows Alichu, a 6-year-old boy forced to take an unexpected trip after a series of natural disasters hit his small Andean town. He reaches Hananpacha, the land of the Wamany, where he suffers the anger of Apu Kontiki, the mountain deity. His older brother Yaku will try to rescue Alichu and release their town from its plight.

“The project presents a new mythological imaginary world never seen before. We have creatures and places which have a very special magic, a universe with rules that have never been explored in depth nor presented in all its splendor,” Prado told Variety.

“Nuna,” in an early pre-production stage, is mainly financed by Origami Studio’s own funds. It won a development award from the Dafo Peruvian Film Fund. Fonica Studio, a Lima’s sound post-production company, is also involved in the project.

“This would be the first time a Peruvian feature film uses a mostly 2D technique, which means an opening for this type of animation’s market,” Prado said. One of the producers’ ambitions is to set up workshops in Peru to train 2D animators, since the country currently has a majority of 3D-specialists, she added.

Initially conceived as a short film, “Nuna” became a feature film production in 2013. Now, it forms part of a trans-media project, which could incorporate vidgames and apps.

At Annecy, the producers are scouring for financing, co-production and distribution partnerships. “We want alliances that further the film’s international reach, building more connections between Peru and the world,” Prado said.

»

- Emiliano De Pablos

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Annecy: Italy and France Forge Closer Toon Ties

15 June 2016 10:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome — Italy is forging closer ties with France in the field of animation production, seeking to tap into the expertise of continental Europe’s leader in this sector and set up some co-productions.

The Rome/Lazio Film Commission has signed a collaboration agreement with prominent French toon production hub Pole Image Magelis, which comprises four studios, 11 schools and a substantial fund.

“France is a leader in this sector — the only European country that can stand up to Hollywood. We have a lot to learn from them,” said Luciano Sovena, president of the Rome/Lazio Film Commission, who brokered the agreement.

Under the pact, Italian animators will be able to acquire French know-how through hands-on experience at Magelis, while the more long-term goal is to set up co-productions with France tapping into incentives in both countries.

As part of the collaboration, Rome/Lazio will next month be hosting French toon creators, including writer-helmer-animator-composer Sylvain Chomet (“The Triplets of Belleville”) and Magelis president Francois Bonneau, at a three-day animation conference where they will hobnob with Italian animation specialists. The conference runs from July 8 to 10.

Italians on hand will include Neapolitan producer Luciano Stella, who screened a 13-minute work-in-progress of animated Neapolitan mob fable “Cinderella the Cat” (pictured) at Annecy on Wednesday.

In “Cinderella the Cat,” the title character’s father is killed by her stepmother in collusion with the Camorra gangs that run the Naples port. Ivan Cappiello, Marino Guarnieri, Alessandro Rak and Dario Sansone share directing credits. Stella’s Mad Entertainment previously produced breakout Neapolitan feature “The Art of Happiness,” which won the 2014 European Film Award in the animation category.

The Rome/Lazio meet will be held in Civita di Bagnoregio, an ancient, picturesque hilltop village that is said to have served as inspiration for Japanese animation auteur Hayao Miyazaki’s “Howl’s Moving Castle.”

Screenings at the Civita di Bagnoregio gathering will include Paris-based On Entertainment’s “The Little Prince,” the highest grossing French animation movie in the past two decades, and “Triplets,” which was nominated for two Oscars.

The Rome/Lazio Film Commission recently launched a 10-million euro ($11.4 million) co-production fund that provides grants and is designed to work in tandem with the country’s competitive tax breaks. Half of the fund is for feature films; the other half is for TV productions. Animation projects qualify in both categories.

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- Nick Vivarelli

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Annecy: Italy and France Forge Closer Toon Ties

15 June 2016 10:36 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rome — Italy is forging closer ties with France in the field of animation production, seeking to tap into the expertise of continental Europe’s leader in this sector and set up some co-productions.

The Rome/Lazio Film Commission has signed a collaboration agreement with prominent French toon production hub Pole Image Magelis, which comprises four studios, 11 schools and a substantial fund.

“France is a leader in this sector — the only European country that can stand up to Hollywood. We have a lot to learn from them,” said Luciano Sovena, president of the Rome/Lazio Film Commission, who brokered the agreement.

Under the pact, Italian animators will be able to acquire French know-how through hands-on experience at Magelis, while the more long-term goal is to set up co-productions with France tapping into incentives in both countries.

As part of the collaboration, Rome/Lazio will next month be hosting French toon creators, including writer-helmer-animator-composer Sylvain Chomet (“The Triplets of Belleville”) and Magelis president Francois Bonneau, at a three-day animation conference where they will hobnob with Italian animation specialists. The conference runs from July 8 to 10.

Italians on hand will include Neapolitan producer Luciano Stella, who screened a 13-minute work-in-progress of animated Neapolitan mob fable “Cinderella the Cat” (pictured) at Annecy on Wednesday.

In “Cinderella the Cat,” the title character’s father is killed by her stepmother in collusion with the Camorra gangs that run the Naples port. Ivan Cappiello, Marino Guarnieri, Alessandro Rak and Dario Sansone share directing credits. Stella’s Mad Entertainment previously produced breakout Neapolitan feature “The Art of Happiness,” which won the 2014 European Film Award in the animation category.

The Rome/Lazio meet will be held in Civita di Bagnoregio, an ancient, picturesque hilltop village that is said to have served as inspiration for Japanese animation auteur Hayao Miyazaki’s “Howl’s Moving Castle.”

Screenings at the Civita di Bagnoregio gathering will include Paris-based On Entertainment’s “The Little Prince,” the highest grossing French animation movie in the past two decades, and “Triplets,” which was nominated for two Oscars.

The Rome/Lazio Film Commission recently launched a 10-million euro ($11.4 million) co-production fund that provides grants and is designed to work in tandem with the country’s competitive tax breaks. Half of the fund is for feature films; the other half is for TV productions. Animation projects qualify in both categories.

»

- Nick Vivarelli

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Annecy: Carlos Juárez and Nicolas Schmerkin Talk About Competition Player ‘Psiconautas’

13 June 2016 1:49 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annecy– Spain’s Annecy competition contender “Psiconautas, the Forgotten Children,” delivers a dark coming-of-ager fantasy, turning on Birdboy and Dinky, two teenagers attempting to flee an ecologically devastated island.

Psiconautas” is produced by Carlos Juárez’s Basque Films, behind last year’s Annecy player “Possessed” actor Luis Tosar and Farruco Castroman’s Zircozine Animation and Nicolas Schmerkin’s Paris-based company Autour de Minuit, serving as associate producer. A spin-off from their short “Birdboy,”–  which preemed at Annecy in 2011 and took best short at Spain’s Goya Academy Awards,– “Psiconautas” is the first feature of Pedro Rivero and Alberto Vázquez. An animated short from the duo, black fantasy “Unicorn Blood,” nabbed best experimental short at Chicago fest. “Psiconautas’” international sales are initially handled by Basque Films.

Where has “Psiconautas” been seen?

Carlos Juárez:  It debuted at the San Sebastian Festival’s Zabaltegi showcase — taking the Lurra Greenpeace kudo, going on to play at Gijon, Sofia, Stuttgart, Guadalajara and Brussels among others, taking best animated feature in Bulgaria and Germany. Now we’re very happy for being in Annecy.

Autour de Minuit has a strong presence in Annecy this year….

Niccolas Schmerkin: Yes. We have four shorts in competition: Alberto Vazquez’s “Decorado,” Donato Sansone’s “Journal Animé,” David Coquard-Dassaut’s “Peripheria,” and Ronny Trocker’s “Estate.” We also have “A Town Called Panic” in the TV showcase.

You also handled the international distribution of “Unicorn Blood” (directed by Vázquez, co-written with Rivero), so you’ve followed them since their beginnings. What attracted you to “Psiconautas”?

Schmerkin: We love their unique way of depicting raw and violent problems in our modern society- from environmental problems to twisted human relationships – with a cute, naif and poetic design. They make a very strong statement about our amoral adult world, from which there is nearly no escape. It’s a bit like Bill Plympton meeting Hayao Miyazaki.

And Autour de Minuit co-produced “Decorado,” which premiered at Directors’ Fortnight in Cannes.

Schmerkin: Yes. And in addition, we’re are also co-developing his next feature film “Unicorn Wars,” with his Spanish producer Ivan Miñambres from Uniko.

As associate producers you have all rights for France and Belgium. Do you plan to release the pic theatrically? If so, when?

Schmerkin: We are currently in discussion with French theatrical distributors. The idea is to release it before the end of 2016.

What are your international expectations, the ideal target for “Psiconautas”?

Juárez: It’s an artistic movie that can reach any audience with different tastes, a niche film but with broad appeal for many people. That’s why “Psiconautas” is doing so well at fests.

But it doesn’t target children?

Juárez: No, but it could attract teens. Teens are more advanced than a few years ago in terms of understanding codes, registers… There’re violence, drugs.. that have a natural but not excessive presence in the plot. The graphic novel had a more adult perspective than the movie. Cartoon movies exclusively for adults are not easy to handle on theatrical circuits. Adults still show a reluctance to pay to see an animation movie only for adults. But things are changing, think of “The Simpsons” where we find a series combining both worlds –adult and youth. Current animation usually mixes its targets.

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- Emilio Mayorga

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When Marnie Was There review – Studio Ghibli conjure magical coming-of-age tale

9 June 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Japanese animation company again demonstrate a fondness for classic English children’s books with this adaptation about a mystical friendship

Related: Kiki’s Delivery Service review – lovable Studio Ghibli coming-of-age story

This lovely animation from 2014 was Studio Ghibli’s last film before its self-imposed hiatus following the retirement of founder Hayao Miyazaki. It is another example of Ghibli’s Anglophilia: a prominent and under-analysed part of its identity. Like other Ghibli films such as Howl’s Moving Castle and Arrietty, the movie is taken from a classic English children’s book, this time Joan Robinson’s Norfolk fantasy adventure from 1967. Clearly the studio responds to a certain kind of heartfelt, un-ironic writing for children. The film shifts the setting to a Japanese coastal town, where a lonely and troubled foster child, Anna, has been sent to stay with relatives. She grows fascinated with an apparently deserted mansion, where she »

- Peter Bradshaw

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'Women are realistic, men idealistic': Studio Ghibli on why a director's gender matters

6 June 2016 10:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

When Hayao Miyazaki left Japan’s legendary studio, Hiromasa Yonebayashi took the reins. He speaks about the shadow cast by his predecessor, animation in the age of Pixar and how men and women approach fantasy differently

When Hayao Miyazaki announced his retirement from Japan’s greatest animation studio in 2013, his young protege Hiromasa Yonebayashi wasn’t worried. The master had already retired five times before. “He was always saying, ‘Oh this could be the last film.’” Yonebayashi shrugs. “He’s still in the office.”

Related: Match the Studio Ghibli screenshot to the movie – quiz

Continue reading »

- Chris Michael

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Exclusive: Hiromasa Yonebayashi & Yoshiaki Nishimura on When Marnie Was There & the future of Ghibli

6 June 2016 2:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Reports have suggested that When Marnie Was There will be the very last feature length film to come out of the immensely popular Studio Ghibli. The Japanese animation studio’s 20th endeavour, and one of few away from the creative genius of Hayao Miyazaki, is instead helmed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi, and we had the pleasure of meeting […]

The post Exclusive: Hiromasa Yonebayashi & Yoshiaki Nishimura on When Marnie Was There & the future of Ghibli appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Stefan Pape

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Studio Ghibli Veteran Animator Makiko Futaki Dies at 57

29 May 2016 9:35 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The animation world has lost a prodigious talent with the death of Makiko Futaki, a longtime Studio Ghibli animator who passed away on May 13 after an unspecified illness. Futaki collaborated on every one of Hayao Miyazaki's films, several of which are regarded as high-water marks of the entire genre: "My Neighbor Totoro," "Princess Mononoke," "Spirited Away" and many others. Futaki was 57 at the time of her passing. Read More: 'The Red Turtle' Trailer: Studio Ghibli Returns With A Mesmerizing Silent Film In addition to her work at Ghibli, which has been among the world's most foremost animation studios for decades, Futaki also served as key animator on 1988's "Akira." Katsuhiro Otomo's dystopian sci-fi anime is likewise considered among the best of its kind ever made. Futaki held the same credit on such films as "Howl's Moving Castle," "From Up on Poppy Hill" and "The Wind Rises." Read More: Watch: A Feminist. »

- Michael Nordine

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Kiki’s Delivery Service review – lovable Studio Ghibli coming-of-age story

26 May 2016 9:15 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This sunny 1989 fantasy by master animator Hayao Miyazaki broaches the issue of female sexuality more boldly than any Western children’s movie would dare

A lovable 1989 anime from Japanese master Hayao Miyazaki, part of the Studio Ghibli Forever season. Like his classic My Neighbour Totoro, this seamlessly works elements of fantasy and mild crises into an everyday children’s story, though this one serves more as a primer for womanhood. Kiki is a young witch – a profession that carries no sinister associations. Having reached the age of 13, tradition dictates that she must fly the nest on a sort of witchy gap year. Accompanied by her sardonic cat Jiji, and with a shaky grip of broomstick aviation, she winds up lodging with a kindly baker, for whom she begins an airborne delivery service.

The plot is so loose as to barely exist, but beneath its sunny, colour-saturated, beautifully animated surface, the »

- Steve Rose

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Macross Zero Anime (2002) Review

23 May 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Macross Zero Anime (2002) ReviewSTORY80%DIRECTION82%ACTION85%ANIMATION85%SOUND80%POSITIVESCharacter analysis, direction and script are on a very high levelTechnically masterfulNEGATIVESNot much time assigned to the "evil"characters2016-05-2382%Overall ScoreReader Rating: (1 Vote)72%

This prequel, 5-episode Ova to “The Super Dimension Fortress Macross”  was released to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Macross franchise.

The script takes place in 2008, a year after the original storyline and revolves around two axes. The first one is the final battles between the U.N. Spacy and the Anti-Un forces and the second one occurs on the secluded island in the Pacific, named Mayan, where an alien spaceship crashed nine years ago. The main hero is Shin Kudo, a pilot for the U.N. forces, who crashed on the island after shot down by an enemy aircraft that can transform into a robot. While there he becomes acquainted with a primitive civilization, where even electric is absent, »

- Panos Kotzathanasis

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The Red Turtle: Watch The First Trailer For The Ghibli Produced Animated Film

20 May 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Fresh from its premiere in Cannes - you can read Ryland Aldrich's review of the film here - the first trailer for Dudok de Wit's The Red Turtle has arrived online and it's not hard at all to see why it's been winning raves. Hotly tipped as a rising star in the animation world since winning an Oscar for his short film Father And Daughter, de Wit won the admiration of Japan's famed Studio Ghibli who made The Red Turtle the studio's first ever international co-production and whil enobody will ever confuse de Wit's style with Ghibli founders Miyazaki Hayao or Takahata Isao the level of quality is certainly comparable. Take a look at the trailer below....

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[Cannes Review] The Red Turtle

19 May 2016 5:03 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Motion, love for the Gaia, and lush orchestral music provide the backbone of Michaël Dudok de Wit’s The Red Turtle, a dialogue-free, feature-length animation about a man stranded on a desert island, co-produced by the legendary Studio Ghibli, their first-ever such production to be made off Japanese soil.

The story goes that producer Vincent Maraval from Wild Bunch showed De Wit’s Oscar-winning short animation Father and Daughter to Hayao Miyazaki in 2007. The legendary animator much admired the film, calling it “very Japanese,” and asked Maraval to locate De Wit. They sent the Dutchman an email, and so The Red Turtle came into being.

With Miyazaki since stepping away from Ghibli productions, Isao Takahata was tasked with making trips to France to contribute to the film. This meeting of styles is apparent from the opening frames as an overturned sailboat is thrashed around in a vast raging sea, a »

- Rory O'Connor

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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Red Turtle’

18 May 2016 9:05 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Washing up on the shores of Cannes after nearly a decade of painstaking under-the-radar toil, Michael Dudok de Wit’s hypnotizing, entirely dialogue-free “The Red Turtle” is a fable so simple, so pure, it feels as if it has existed for hundreds of years, like a brilliant shard of sea glass rendered smooth and elegant through generations of retelling. The product of a unique collaboration between Studio Ghibli and Dutch-born, London-based animator Dudok de Wit, this tiny artistic treasure might as well be the adaptation of a little-known Hans Christian Andersen classic, or else perhaps that of a folk tale brought back from some remote South Pacific island. But no, this captivating archetypal narrative springs from the mind of its director, and the result is the most purely auteurist project to be found at the Cannes Film Festival this year, if by no means an obvious commercial play beyond France and Japan. »

- Peter Debruge

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Hosoda Mamoru And Iwai Shunji Headed For Tokyo International Film Festival

18 May 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Early news has arrived from Tokyo International Film festival as they announce major retrospectives from two of the country’s most compelling filmmakers. Animation maestro Hosoda Mamoru’s star has been on the rise for some time now. From 2006’s The Girl Who Leapt Through Time through Summer Wars, Wolf Children and last year’s smash hit The Boy and the Beast, the inventive director’s work has gone from strength to strength. Often compared to the legendary Miyazaki Hayao, the crossover appeal of his work and increasing box office returns, as well as the beauty and vision of his work, sees the comparison increasingly justified. The festival’s special focus on Japanese Animation began in 2014 with Evangelion creator Anno Hideaki, followed by a program on influential series Mobile...

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