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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999

1-20 of 374 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


John Lasseter Hails Hayao Miyazaki, Japan and the Joy of Juxtaposition

5 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tokyo — Invited to speak in Tokyo as part of the ‘Cool Japan’ cultural promotion drive, animator John Lasseter delivered a heart-felt and deeply personal tribute to Japan, Japanese film culture, and fellow animation icon Hayao Miyazaki.

“Thank you, Japan for making me who I am,” he said by way of conclusion in front of a packed theatre at the Tokyo International Film Festival on Friday.

The speech was carefully written and enthusiastically presented by a Lasseter who clearly intended to educate as much as he was there to promote. Lasseter is chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studio, and DisneyToon Studios.

He included early photographs of himself and fellow student animators at California Institute of the Arts, showed a clip of Miyazaki’s “Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro,” which he described as “clever and economical” animation, but with depth. And then described how »

- Patrick Frater

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John Lasseter Pays Emotional Tribute to Hayao Miyazaki at Tokyo Film Festival

5 hours ago | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

John Lasseter, chief creative officer at Pixar, Walt Disney Animation Studios and DisneyToon Studios, paid an emotional tribute to Japanese animation master Hayao Miyazaki at a special keynote appearance Friday night at the Tokyo International Film Festival. Appearing to tear up several times during his one-hour talk, Lasseter said: "Whenever we get stuck at Pixar or Disney, I put on a Miyazaki film sequence or two, just to get us inspired again." Lasseter was invited by the festival to discuss the concept of "Cool Japan," the Japanese government's slogan for promoting the nation's culture industries. The two-

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- Patrick Brzeski

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First Wave Of Big Hero 6 Reviews Point To Disney Having A Superhero-Sized Hit

18 hours ago | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

The Hollywood Reporter: "Funny and heartwarming story" "Like Frozen, Big Hero 6, co-directed by Don Hall and Chris Williams, handily defies convention in regard to presumably skewing more to one gender demo over the other. Sure, it’s got robotics and superheroes, but it also has plenty of emotional resonance and, of course, merchandising gold in the form of an oversized, huggable vinyl balloon of a Personal Healthcare Companion that bears more than a passing physical resemblance to the star of Hayao Miyazaki’s My Neighbor Totoro. The appealing result should cast a very wide net for Disney, with a strong potential for future heroics." - Michael Rechtshaffen The Playlist: "Truly glorious to look at " "Whatever flaws it has are ones of over-enthusiasm and over-ambition and are therefore easy to forgive, especially because when it works, it really works [read: there were tears]. It’s a film that clearly has had lots of care »

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Tokyo Festival Opens With Pomp, Prime Minister and Hints of Levity

23 October 2014 4:29 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tokyo — The 27th running of the Tokyo International Film Festival got under way Thursday with pomp and circumstance – and just the right degree of levity.

The opening ceremony in the Roppongi Hills complex was attended by a Japanese princess, two ministers and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, as well as a coterie of international guests.

In a speech without notes, Abe identified detailed elements of the festival program, pitched Tokyo as a gateway to Asian cinema, and personally welcomed U.S. animation icon John Lasseter. He also repeated the country’s ‘Cool Japan’ culture and tourism pitch and joshed with five part boy-band Arashi, who were dressed like the Pm in sharp, dark suits. “I hope some of their popularity rubs off on the government,” he said.

In a city they obviously admire, the directing and production team from opening film “Big Hero 6” gushed their thanks and wonderment at being part of the opening event. »

- Patrick Frater and Mark Schilling

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‘Big Hero 6′ Gets Typically Japanese Launch Ahead of Tokyo World Premiere

22 October 2014 12:41 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tokyo — Disney Animation’s “Big Hero 6” got a very Japanese send-off Wednesday at an event on the eve of the film’s world premiere as the opening night movie of the Tokyo International Film Festival.

The press event was held high above the Nippon capital at the Park Hyatt Hotel, previous setting for Sofia Coppola’s “Lost In Translation.”

The well-attended event was carefully stage-managed and, aside from a little spontaneity, there was little chance of anything being lost.

Photographers snapped when they were told to and halted exactly when directed. A coterie of black-clad assistants proffered microphones on bended knees, and a pair of on-stage interpreters never fluffed a line.

Big Hero 6” is set in a fictional San Fransokyo – a mash up of San Francisco and Tokyo – and co-directors Don Hall and Chris Williams fell over themselves to pay repeated tribute to their long-standing appreciation of Japanese animation icon Hayao Miyazaki, »

- Patrick Frater

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Studio Ghibli Quietly Enters Oscar Animation Race with 'Princess Kaguya'

20 October 2014 11:11 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Director Isao Takahata may not have the Oscar pedigree of Studio Ghibli's is-he-or-isn't-he-retired figurehead Hayao Miyazaki. But Takahata is a revered animated filmmaker whose latest, "The Tale of Princess Kaguya," has been unassumingly picking up festival awards and buzz and critical acclaim, and could prove a stealthy contender for the Best Animated Feature Oscar. Here's why: In his latest Toh! arthouse box office report, Tom Brueggemann writes: Enterprising GKids has managed to break into the Oscar Animated Feature race with several foreign-made films, and this Studio Ghibli production (not from master director Hayao Miyazaki) is positioned to continue that trend. This is the best-reviewed animated film of the year (by a large margin). Its opening numbers are quite strong, particularly with the modest ad buy. This isn't at the level of the also Ghibli-made "From Up on Poppy Hill" (from Miyazaki's son) which last year did $57,000 its first weekend in two. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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DVD Review – The Wind Rises (2013)

18 October 2014 1:35 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Wind Rises (Japan: Kaze tachinu), 2013.

Directed by Hayao Miyazaki.

Starring Hideaki Anno, Hidetoshi Nishijima, Miori Takimoto, Masahiko Nishimura, [For English dub]: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, John Krasinski, Emily Blunt and Martin Short.

Synopsis:

A profile of Jiro Horikoshi (Anno/Gordon-Levitt), a Japanese engineer who designed fighter planes during World War II.

The swan song of Hayao Miyazaki…say it ain’t so!! Still, Clint Eastwood made a similar remark about retiring after Gran Torino (2008) and has still carried on. So maybe we haven’t seen the last of Miyazaki; it wouldn’t certainly be a huge loss to cinema and animation if it happens to be true. If Miyazaki has finally taken leave on his Ghibli efforts, what a way to go out. The Wind Rises is not the best the studio has produced – just because the man is leaving the business there is no need to get hyperbolic – though it is a spectacular film, »

- Gary Collinson

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Studio Ghibli’s Latest, The Tale of Princess Kaguya, Is Quiet But Powerful

17 October 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Magical and melancholy, The Tale of Princess Kaguya comes from the other mad genius of Studio Ghibli, Isao Takahata, who co-founded the beloved Japanese animation company alongside the great Hayao Miyazaki back in 1985. Somewhat more idiosyncratic than Miyazaki — and with a darker streak — Takahata was responsible for 1988’s war drama Grave of the Fireflies, still probably the most scarring animated film I’ve ever seen, but also possibly the most beautiful. The Tale of Princess Kaguya is a gentler work, and at first, it feels slighter, too. Based on an old, popular Japanese legend, it starts off like an odd little fable, but then its expansive sadness sneaks up on you.Hand-drawn, in a style that looks to my untrained eye at times like lightly colored charcoal sketches, Kaguya begins with a bamboo cutter discovering a mysterious, teeny-tiny, elegantly dressed girl inside a glowing bamboo stalk. He takes her »

- Bilge Ebiri

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The Tale of The Princess Kaguya | Review

16 October 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Princess from the Moon: Takahata Bows with Feminist Spin on Fable

Following the news of Hayao Miyazaki’s possible retirement after the release of 2013’s The Wind Rises, Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata unleashes his own swansong with The Tale of the Princess Kaguya. Sadly, it was announced that its December release last year was not able to recoup its production budget, leading the famed studio to hint at closing its doors after other recent titles similarly underperformed. The news lends an even stronger taint of melancholy to Takahata’s gently emotional fable that subtly examines class and gender issues with all the painterly finesse of the classic tale it’s based upon.

An old bamboo cutter finds a small princess within a stalk of shining bamboo. Bringing the nymph sized creature home to his wife, it turns into an infant child that displays a rather rapid growth rate. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Review: Studio Ghibli's Rich And Rewarding 'The Tale Of Princess Kaguya'

14 October 2014 4:05 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This is a reprint of our review from the 2014 Cannes Directors' Fortnight. Studio Ghibli is at a real crossroads in its history. The legendary Japanese animation studio has become a respected name even in the West, thanks to a string of classics that trump even Pixar, but last year, the legendary Hayao Miyazaki debuted "The Wind Rises," the film he claims will be his final one (and certainly feels like it's putting a period at the end of a career). The better news is that Miyazaki's Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata, the sort of George Harrison to Miyazaki's Lennon & McCartney, and director of the astonishing "Grave Of The Fireflies," has returned with "The Tale Of Princess Kaguya," his first film since "My Neighbors The Yamadas" in 1999. Given that he's 78, and not hugely prolific, it's possible that this turns out to be Takahata's final film too, and if that's the case, it's »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Studio Ghibli: 7 Unforgettable Moments That Defined Their Films

14 October 2014 11:37 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Studio Ghibli

In August Studio Ghibli downed tools and revealed that they would be taking a break from production, raising concerns among fans that they may never return after years of delighting audiences around the world with their award-winning animated films. The news coincided with the studio’s announcement that company founder and movie legend Hayao Miyazaki was retiring from the creation of feature-length releases altogether.

One of Japan’s greatest living animators, Miyazaki underlines the distinctive outlook that informs his studio’s storytelling, having stated that “the concept of portraying evil and then destroying it – I know that this is considered mainstream, but I think it is rotten. This idea that whenever something evil happens someone particular can be blamed and punished for it … is hopeless.”

His ideas permeate all of his company’s work, swapping conventional portrayals of good and evil and focusing instead on enthralling settings and nuanced character development. »

- Sam Carter

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Judgment day for Downey, Duvall

12 October 2014 4:18 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

The verdict is in from audiences in Australia and Us on The Judge, the father-son dramedy starring Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall, and it.s not favourable.

The mish-mash of courtroom drama, thriller, romance and comedy fetched $1 million in Oz last weekend, a distant fourth behind the second outings of Gone Girl, Annabelle and Dracula Untold.

In the Us the $50 million movie from Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures, written and directed by (David Dobkin (The Change-Up, Wedding Crashers), took an estimated $US13.2 million, less than half Gone Girl.s second weekend.

Downey plays a glib, smart-ass lawyer who returns to his hometown for his mother's funeral only to discover that his estranged father, the town's judge, is suspected of murder.

That.s not an auspicious debut from Team Downey, the production shingle founded by the actor and his wife Susan Downey.

The end of school vacation resulted in »

- Don Groves

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Tim's Toons: the Best of Isao Takahata

10 October 2014 11:10 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Tim here. The Tale of Princess Kaguya , which could well compete for the animated Oscar this year, opens next week. But at that point I will be deep down in the pits of film festival madness (the Chicago International Film Festival starts today). So I want to talk about this now, lest I forget.

And that is the last thing I’d ever want to do, since Kaguya’s director, Isao Takahata, is (was?), along with Hayao Miyazaki, one of the twin gods of Studio Ghibli, though a director whose work was never as widely-known in the English-speaking world as his colleague’s. They're smaller in scale and less fantastic; one of his absolute best Ghibli-era works has never been released in the States, because the rights lie with Disney and one scene involves a discussion of menstruation, and we can’t have filthiness like that in our animation here, »

- Tim Brayton

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Kiki’S Delivery Service delivers on Hong Kong DVD

5 October 2014 11:39 AM, PDT | 24framespersecond.net | See recent 24FramesPerSecond news »

For those that aren't familiar with it, Kiki's Delivery Service is a live action take on Studio Ghibli's 1989 animated feature, directed by Japan's very own Uncle Walt, Hayao Miyazaki. The new film is based on the children's fantasy novel "Kiki's Delivery Service" by Eiko Kadono, first published in 1985 by Fukuinkan Shoten. In a surprising change of pace, The Grudge director Shimizu Takashi has adapted the enchanting story of a girl who comes to terms with her magical power into a charming live-action film. With a script co-written by Shimizu and Okudera Satoko (Summer Wars), the new Kiki's Delivery Service stars newcomer Koshiba Fuka as Kiki, a young witch who flies to a seaside town to complete her training. The film is available now on English subtitled DVD. It won't set you back too much either because the Hong Kong version is available to buy online now. The question is, »

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Kiki’S Delivery Service is a kind of magic on Hk DVD

5 October 2014 11:39 AM, PDT | 24framespersecond.net | See recent 24FramesPerSecond news »

For those that aren't familiar with it, Kiki's Delivery Service is a live action take on Studio Ghibli's 1989 animated feature, directed by Japan's very own Uncle Walt, Hayao Miyazaki. The new film is based on the children's fantasy novel "Kiki's Delivery Service" by Eiko Kadono, first published in 1985 by Fukuinkan Shoten. In a surprising change of pace, The Grudge director Shimizu Takashi has adapted the enchanting story of a girl who comes to terms with her magical power into a charming live-action film. With a script co-written by Shimizu and Okudera Satoko (Summer Wars), the new Kiki's Delivery Service stars newcomer Koshiba Fuka as Kiki, a young witch who flies to a seaside town to complete her training. The film is available now on English subtitled DVD. It won't set you back too much either because the Hong Kong version is available to buy online now. The question is, »

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‘The Wind Rises’ Blu-ray Review

1 October 2014 2:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Knowing a film is to be Hayao Miyazaki’s last is something you don’t really want to hear, but The Wind Rises shows why he is such a master of his art.  Studio Ghibli is a company that I regard as being the best at what they do, and that is no small thing when you think of their competition.  If this truly is his last film, then Miyazaki leaves us with a masterpiece.

Loosely based on the life story of Jiro Horikoshi the Japanese plane designer who created the Zero fighter plane used in World War 2 it is the story of hardship, and the effects of earthquakes, tuberculosis epidemics and economic depression on Japan that pushes them into the industrial age of war.  Horikoshi’s dream was to build planes at a time when something new was needed and he had the skill to do it.  Though his »

- Paul Metcalf

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DVD Review: 'The Wind Rises'

30 September 2014 1:14 PM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆A celebration of craftsmanship and the creative process, legendary animator Hayao Miyazaki's mooted swansong, The Wind Rises (2013), examines the delineation between truth and beauty, questioning whether you can separate cause and effect when it comes to the work of an artist. Unlike much of Ghibli's oeuvre, The Wind Rises inhabits the adult world, presenting us with a highly fictionalised biopic about Japanese aeronautical engineer Jiro Horikoshi. However, that's not to say there isn't magic to be found beneath the bolts and rivets. Renowned for being the chief engineer behind the Japanese A6M Zero fighter plane, Miyazaki focuses on the innovator in Jiro, rather than the traumatic legacy of his life's work.

»

- CineVue UK

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More Miyazaki Madness! Princess Mononoke Plays Midnights This Weekend at The Tivoli

28 September 2014 8:55 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Ugh, I smell like a human!”

Princess Mononoke plays this weekend (October 5th and 6th) at the Tivoli as part of their Reel Late at the Tivoli Midnight series. The midnight show this weekend is sponsored by Star Clipper, (St. Louis’ premier pop culture shop), who will provide trivia and prizes.

Hayao Miyazaki’s Princess Mononoke (1997) is  reportedly a delightful anime from the man who has come to define everything that is best about the genre, I’ve never seen it, but Miyazaki always brings in the crowds for the midnight shows so I’m sure it’s a worthy choice. Princess Mononoke was Miyazaki’s calling card to the world outside Japan. The English voice cast boasts Billy Crudup, Billy Bob Thornton, Minnie Driver, Claire Danes, Jada Pinkett Smith, Gillan Anderson and Keith David – a considerable volume of talent for an animation back in 1997 (Toy Story was 1995), arguably marking »

- Tom Stockman

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The Wind Rises DVD Review

27 September 2014 3:08 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: Hayao Miyazaki

Starring: Hideaki Anno, Hidetoshi Nishijima, Miori Takimoto, Masahiko Nishimura, Mansai Nomura, Jun Kunimura, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Martin Short, Stanley Tucci, Mandy Patinkin, Mae Whitman, Werner Herzog, William H. Macy.

Running Time: 126 minutes

Certificate: PG

The end of an era? We can only hope not. After all, Hayao Miyazaki has attempted retirement before, but then again, there is something about The Wind Rises that feels very definite and complete. The supposed final film of one of cinema’s true greats is not just a riveting biography of plane designer Jiro Hirokoshi, but also a look inside the soul of Miyazaki himself.

Miyazaki has always had a love for planes, ever since being born into a family that ran Miyazaki Airplanes. His films often contain flying apparati such as planes and airships, from Castle In The Sky to Porco Rosso. Now he delves back into the life of Hirokoshi, »

- Luke Ryan Baldock

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Tiff Interview: 'The Tale of Princess Kaguya' Director Isao Takahata

25 September 2014 1:29 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"It was all very difficult..." It's not surprising that it is as wonderful to sit down and talk with the people from Studio Ghibli as it is to watch the wonderful movies they make. A few years ago, I was lucky enough to interview Hayao Miyazaki prior to his retirement during a trip over to the Us to promote Ponyo. While up in Toronto at Tiff 2014 this year, I had the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to meet up with and interview Isao Takahata, the director of the beautiful film The Tale of Princess Kaguya, which was released in Japan last year and arrives in Us theaters this fall. He was wonderful to speak with, making my entire trip worth it. As with Miyazaki, the interviewed was conducted with a translator, so it's shorter than usual because it takes extra time to have both questions and answers translated. Takahata-san is an iconic animator »

- Alex Billington

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999

1-20 of 374 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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