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The Punisher: All of the Different Frank Castles Ranked

Ahead of The Punisher on Netflix, Ben Robins ranks all of the different Frank Castles…

In an almost unprecedented act of genius, Marvel’s long lost, secretly loved but consistently butchered anti-hero The Punisher is finally getting his own ultra-violent spin-off series. And with star of just about every crime/drama movie/series in the last few years Jon Bernthal returning to re-don the skull-soaked tee after his first bow in Daredevil season 2, it feels like the perfect time to revisit all of the temporary Frank Castles that came before him.

Because it seems that Bernthal is actually here to stay, something that can’t be said of any of the hard-nosed actors that leapt into the role before him. In fact, Bernthal’s return to the role is the first time anybody has ever played the character more than once in an official context. Although as you’ll soon see,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

7 Essential Debut Films Directed By Female Filmmakers, From ‘Ratcatcher’ to ‘The Virgin Suicides’

  • Indiewire
7 Essential Debut Films Directed By Female Filmmakers, From ‘Ratcatcher’ to ‘The Virgin Suicides’
When Greta Gerwig’s already-lauded “Lady Bird” hits limited release later this week, the actress-writer-director will join a long line of other female filmmakers who used their directorial debut (this one is Gerwig’s solo directorial debut, just for clarity’s sake) to not only launch their careers, but make a huge mark while doing it. Gerwig’s Saoirse Ronan-starring coming-of-age tale is an instant classic, and one that shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to anyone who has enjoyed Gerwig’s charming work as a screenwriter in recent years, bolstered by her ear for dialogue and her love of complicated and complex leading ladies.

While Hollywood still lags when it comes to offering up opportunities to its most talented female filmmakers, many of them have overcome the dismal stats to deliver compelling, interesting, and unique first features. In short, they’re good filmmakers who made good movies,
See full article at Indiewire »

Kevin Feige Reveals How Women Could Contribute to the Marvel Universe After Phase Three

  • Indiewire
Kevin Feige Reveals How Women Could Contribute to the Marvel Universe After Phase Three
As the Marvel Cinematic Universe readies for its Phase Three finale — the culmination of what will end up being a 22-film run of interconnected feature films, starting with 2008’s “Iron Man” and concluding with its still-unnamed fourth Avengers feature, set to open on May 3, 2019 — the multi-billion dollar blockbuster machine is already looking to the future.

But even with a pair of “post-Phase Three” films already on the docket, including a Spider-Man sequel and a third Guardians of the Galaxy film, the future of the McU still looks overwhelmingly male, and Marvel’s bent towards superhero (not heroine)-dominated features doesn’t seem to be changing directions. Yet.

Before Phase Three wraps, the McU will finally roll out its first superheroine-centric feature: the Brie Larson-starring “Captain Marvel,” which will open just before that final “Avengers” film. The long-rumored feature will also mark another sea change for the company, as it
See full article at Indiewire »

Rose McGowan, Lena Dunham, Amber Tamblyn, and Others React to Harvey Weinstein Sexual Harassment Allegations

  • Indiewire
Rose McGowan, Lena Dunham, Amber Tamblyn, and Others React to Harvey Weinstein Sexual Harassment Allegations
Reactions to today’s New York Times story on the many allegations of sexual harassment made against Harvey Weinstein have been expectedly strong. Weinstein is suing the paper for $50 million, while others in the film industry have taken to social media to share their thoughts.

Read More:Harvey Weinstein’s Decades of Sexual Assault Allegations: Ashley Judd Leads Accusers in Nyt Exposé

I want to buy the movie rights

— rose mcgowan (@rosemcgowan) October 4, 2017

I own the movie rights.

Asia Argento (@AsiaArgento) October 5, 2017

Heed the mantra and never forget: Women. Have. Nothing. To. Gain. And. Everything. To Lose. By. Coming. forward. https://t.co/ynKX1bcBkK

Amber Tamblyn (@ambertamblyn) October 5, 2017

Read More:Harvey Weinstein Is Suing the New York Times for $50 Million Over Its Sexual Harassment Story

I took meetings at Weinstein. With other female execs. But every single time I’d hear “as long as you aren’t meeting with Harvey,
See full article at Indiewire »

'The Punisher': Everything You Need to Know About Marvel's Vigilante Antihero

'The Punisher': Everything You Need to Know About Marvel's Vigilante Antihero
Black clothes. White skull. Smoking guns. These are the gloriously simple ingredients behind the Punisher, the no-holds-barred antihero who'll soon be starring in one of the fall's most anticipated series. As played by The Walking Dead's Jon Bernthal during the second season of Netflix's Daredevil, the gun-toting vigilante stole every scene he was in, making the network's relentless campaign of teases and trailers damn near irresistible. But like every major superhero, he's taken a long strange trip from his comic-book origins to his modern-day multimedia superstardom. Below, you'll find
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Walking Dead’ Cast Members, Other Stars React to Death of Stuntman John Bernecker

‘Walking Dead’ Cast Members, Other Stars React to Death of Stuntman John Bernecker
Hollywood mourned the loss of “The Walking Dead” stuntman John Bernecker following his death from injuries sustained on set.

AMC halted production of the show’s eighth season in wake of the tragedy. Bernecker was shooting a scene in which he was supposed to fall off a 20-foot balcony onto a safety cushion below. He missed the cushion and hit the concrete instead.

Celebrities, including his “Walking Dead” castmates, offered condolences on Twitter to the veteran stunt performer and fight choreographer.

Jeffrey Dean Morgan, who plays Negan on the series, penned, “Deep sorrow today, and for every tomorrow. Love, respect, and condolences to John’s family and friends. He will be forever missed.”

Deep sorrow today, and for every tomorrow. Love, respect, and condolences to johns family, and friends. He will be forever missed.

Jeffrey Dean Morgan (@JDMorgan) July 14, 2017

“Keeping John Bernecker and his family in my thoughts,” wrote Peter Zimmerman, who
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Wonder Woman’ Makes History: How Patty Jenkins Lost the Chance to Direct One Big Superhero Movie and Landed a Better One

  • Indiewire
‘Wonder Woman’ Makes History: How Patty Jenkins Lost the Chance to Direct One Big Superhero Movie and Landed a Better One
Patty Jenkins was always going to make history. Back in 2011, the “Monster” director was picked to helm Marvel’s first “Thor” sequel, making her not only the first female filmmaker to direct one of the burgeoning Marvel Cinematic Universe’s films, but the first to direct any studio-backed big-budget superhero franchise film. (Lexi Alexander broke similar ground when she directed “Punisher: War Zone” in 2008, though that film is not part of a wider franchise and was produced by Lionsgate.) After just two months on the project, Jenkins and Marvel parted ways – the old “creative differences” line was tossed around by both sides – and the job eventually went to Alan Taylor.

Jenkins moved on, turning her attention to prestige TV like “The Killing” and “Betrayal,” but the superhero world kept calling. Six years later, Jenkins finally got her superhero property, thanks to the DC Extended Universe and their much-anticipated (and so far extremely well-reviewed) “Wonder Woman.
See full article at Indiewire »

Everything You Need to Know About 'Wonder Woman,' the DC Universe & How Gal Gadot Got Lynda Carter's Blessing

Everything You Need to Know About 'Wonder Woman,' the DC Universe & How Gal Gadot Got Lynda Carter's Blessing
Believe it or not, when Wonder Woman arrives in theaters on June 2, it will be the first time the character has fronted her own live-action movie. (Versus Superman's 10 or so different films and even more Batman movies.) And, in fact, the only other time Wonder Woman has appeared on the big screen is Gal Gadot's supporting role in last year's Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. All of which is to say, you may have some questions. Like...

Warner Bros. Pictures

How similar is this Wonder Woman to the one in the comic books? Diana, Princess of Themyscira (or Diana Prince, as she's known to mere mortals) first appeared in the pages of All Star Comics #8 in 1941, created by writer William Moulton Marston and artist Harry G. Peter. Everything you know about the Amazonian warrior -- her tiara, her indestructible bracelets, the Lasso of Truth -- remains intact some 75 years later, as do many
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Stylish Fan Poster For The Punisher Features Lots Of Guns

The Punisher has had a rough path when it comes to screen adaptations. 1989’s stab at the character starred Dolph Lundgren as Frank Castle and, while not bad by cheeseball 80s action standards, didn’t have much in common with the Marvel comic (Lundgren didn’t even wear a skull T-shirt!). Thomas Jane’s 2004 effort honestly wasn’t that much better, committing the fatal crime of just being a bit dull, while Lexi Alexander’s Punisher: War Zone is secretly amazing, though next to no one went to see it – so that was another dead end. But now Netflix are having a go at it with The Punisher.

The show has the advantage that we’re already familiar with this version of the character. Jon Bernthal’s Frank Castle made his debut in the second season of Daredevil, and was probably the best thing in it. So, we already had high hopes for the series,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Silver & Black’: Gina Prince-Bythewood Becomes First African-American Woman to Direct Studio-Made Superhero Feature

  • Indiewire
As Warner Bros. and their DC Extended Universe prepare to bow their first female filmmaker-helmed superhero feature with next week’s “Wonder Woman,” Sony Pictures appears to be getting similarly hip to the possibilities of picking genuinely diverse and compelling directors to helm their franchise properties.

Deadline reports that Sony is setting filmmaker Gina Prince-Bythewood to direct their “Silver & Black” — based on the Marvel characters Silver Sable and Black Cat — making her the first African-American woman to direct a studio-produced superhero film. Prince-Bythewood doesn’t just have the chops, thanks to her consistently stellar feature work on films like “Beyond the Lights,” “Love & Basketball,” and “The Secret Life of Bees” (all of which she wrote and directed), but she’s also got some hard-won superhero experience, having just directed the pilot for Marvel’s “Cloak & Dagger” Freeform series.

Read More: ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Trailer: Tom Holland Fights Michael Keaton in Upcoming
See full article at Indiewire »

Sylvester Stallone, Jackie Chan set for new action film

Simon Brew May 12, 2017

Sylvester Stallone and Jackie Chan are to make an action film set in Iraq, and around the Highway Of Death area.

For the first time, Sylvester Stallone and Jackie Chan are set to share the screen together, as the pair have signed up for the new action thriller, Ex-Baghdad. The movie is being produced by Sr Media, Chan's company, and Stallone is reported to have picked up this film as a consequence of his decision to quit The Expendables movie series.

The movie centres on a Chinese-run oil refinery that’s based in Iraq. When it gets attacked, its owners call in Jackie Chan to help free its workers. He in turn needs a bit of help from a former Us Marine – that’d be Stallone – and action ensues. It's being directed by Scott Waugh, who helmed the Need For Speed film. Waugh also worked as a
See full article at Den of Geek »

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017

Mira Nair and Ava DuVernay: Wikimedia Commons/IndiaFM/Bollywoodhungama/usbotschaftberlin

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

Female filmmakers greeted the 21st century with optimism. By most measures, movies by women were garnering increased respect in the industry and at the multiplex. Their makers cracked glass ceilings, created new genres, and established new box-office records.

With “Nowhere in Africa” (2001), Caroline Link became the second woman to direct the Oscar-winner for the year’s best foreign film. With “Lost in Translation” (2003), Sofia Coppola was the third woman to receive a best director nomination from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And with “The Hurt Locker” (2009), Kathryn Bigelow was the fourth woman nominated in the directing category — and the first to win. The following year, Danish filmmaker Susanna Bier directed the winner in the best foreign film category, “In a Better World.”

Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love & Basketball” (2000), Karyn Kusama’s “Girlfight” (2000) and Gurinder Chadha’s “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003) created what might be called the “Title IX” movie, celebrating female athletes on the court, in the ring, and on the field. These are sports movies that celebrate the female body — not for its sex appeal, but for its power. These films inspired younger women (and their mothers were thrilled to take them to movies that didn’t objectify women).

Comedies by women continued to make serious box office, proving the Hollywood wisdom that “funny is money.” Nancy Meyers’ “What Women Want” (2000), starring Mel Gibson as a player briefly given the power to hear what women think about him, made $374 million. Sharon Maguire’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001), in which the title character says what she thinks about womanizers and prigs, brought in $282 million. Movies like these permitted men and women to laugh at men’s foibles.

From Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” (2002), which introduced America Ferrera as a college-bound Latina, to Julie Taymor’s biopic “Frida” (2003), with Salma Hayek as Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, to Patty Jenkins’ “Monster” (2003), with Charlize Theron as serial killer Aileen Wuornos, audiences saw realistic women — as opposed to human swizzle sticks with breasts — in movies by women.

Many critics hailed Niki Caro’s “Whale Rider” (2003), about a Maori preteen who challenges her tribal patriarchy and becomes the new chief, as a harbinger of the triumph of female filmmakers over the status quo. Others pointed to the fact that for the first time since records had been kept, in 2000 women made 11 percent of the top 250 box office films. For women who make movies, the new century felt like a new day.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Sadly, that encouraging percentage turned out to be a fluke. After 2000, the number dwindled. It remains stuck in the 6 to 9 percent range, says Martha Lauzen, professor of communications and head of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University. Since 1998 Lauzen has tracked women working in the industry in her annual “Celluloid Ceiling” report.

“When I started this, I thought it was merely an issue of people not knowing how low the numbers were,” Lauzen said ruefully. “I didn’t know how slow social change is.”

Lauzen’s reporting represents one of three vital resources for understanding the triumphs female filmmakers have made and how far they need to go to achieve parity with men. The others are Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity and Social Change Institute at USC’s Annenberg School and The Bunche Center at UCLA.

Collectively and individually, these creators of annual good news/bad news reports have kept the issue of representation in the public eye.

The Good: For Kathryn Bigelow (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”), the late Nora Ephron (“Julie & Julia”), and Nancy Meyers (“It’s Complicated,” “The Intern”), the 21st century has been a fruitful time. So, too, for younger female moviemakers. Consider Lisa Cholodenko (“Laurel Canyon,” “The Kids Are All Right”), Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “13th”), and Mira Nair (“Monsoon Wedding,” “The Namesake”).

Consider also that Catherine Hardwicke established a franchise with “Twilight” (which made $393 million), Sam Taylor-Johnson created another with “50 Shades of Grey” ($571 million), and that Anne Fletcher’s “The Proposal” made $317 million and Phyllida Lloyd’s “Mamma Mia!” earned $609 million.

Additionally, filmmakers like Dee Rees (“Pariah”), Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”), and Lone Scherfig (“An Education”) broke into the market with unique visions and eyes for new talent, including Adepero Oduye, Jennifer Lawrence, and Carey Mulligan. Significantly, Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”), Jennifer Lee (“Frozen”), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (“Kung Fu Panda 2”), and Brenda Chapman (“Brave”) staked a place for women in animation.

The Bad: For every woman appearing onscreen in movies in 2015 there were 2.3 men, according to Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity & Social Change Initiative.

The Ugly: When Walt Hickey, culture reporter for the website fivethirtyeight.com, goes to the movies and sees the screen population is 69 percent male, it just looks wrong to him. “It’s like something apocalyptic has happened, like a parallel universe — a man’s world,” he says.

Both Lauzen’s and Smith’s data show that when a woman is behind the camera and/or screenplay, 39 percent of protagonists are female. In movies by male directors, only four percent of the lead characters are female.

A century ago, male dominance behind the camera and on the screen was not the norm. For women behind the camera, it’s been the norm since 1920. And for women onscreen, it’s been the norm since 1950. Because of this, moviegoers have a distorted picture of America as predominantly male and predominantly Caucasian, when it is neither. (For finer-grain data on minority representation, see this annual report from UCLA’s Bunche Center.)

The Force Reawakens

The Hollywood Dream Factory tailors the majority of its product to the measurements of the men in the audience. This troubles those who want their daughters to partake of the same professional opportunities, cultural representation, and dream lives as their sons. While “Nine to Five,” “Norma Rae,” and “Erin Brockovich” show that studios love stories of women who triumph over the odds, there is less obvious love for female filmmakers trying to beat the odds stacked against them in their professional lives.

Since the Original Six filed suit against two studios in 1983 (see Part 3), female filmmakers have met, strategized, and troubleshot. So much so that in one of her final essays before her death in 2012, Nora Ephron made a list of “Things I Won’t Miss.” Near the top: “Panels on Women in Film.” Many women in film felt as though they were running in place.

“Instead of holding a million panels about it,” Christine Vachon, producer of “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Carol,” exclaimed at the 2016 Sundance Festival, “let’s do something about it!”

Someone had. She is Maria Giese, director of the feature films “When Saturday Comes” and “Hunger.” In February 2013 she brought a complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Eeoc) in Los Angeles. Her contention was that the cohort of working filmmakers in the Directors Guild of America (DGA), of which she is a member, was overwhelmingly male.

(While the number of women in the guild directing episodic television amounts to 17 percent, the DGA 2015 census of female filmmakers registered 6.4 percent. That’s lower than the nine percent of female coal miners, and fractional next to the 32 percent of practicing physicians and 36 percent of practicing lawyers who are women).

The Eeoc, which collects data on employer/employee relations for each calendar year, was reluctant to take on a class-action suit.

In April 2013, Giese contacted the Aclu of Southern California and showed the evidence to Melissa Goodman, director of its Lgbtq, Gender & Reproductive Justice Project. For the next two years Goodman and her colleague Ariela Migdal took testimony from more than 50 female directors. In May 2015 they sent the Eeoc an extraordinary letter that counted the ways in which “female filmmakers are effectively excluded from directing big-budget films and seriously underrepresented in television.” A compelling argument in their letter: “The entertainment industry employs many people and makes products that profoundly shape our culture and the perception of women and girls.” Later in 2015, the Eeoc commenced its own investigation.

In January 2017, based on a high-level internal DGA leak received by Giese, Deadline Hollywood reported that after a federal investigation spanning a year that included testimony from over 100 women directors, the Eeoc recently served charges of sex discrimination and unfair hiring practice against all six major studios. While the federal agency does not comment on active cases, Gillian Thomas and Melissa Goodman of the Aclu wrote in an editorial that they had no reason to doubt the veracity of the leak.

A key factor contributing to Giese’s success in getting this issue to the Aclu and Eeoc was her ability to expose the structural obstacles female filmmakers face, from a guild that puts female and minority filmmakers in the same category, to the studios that question the fitness of women to direct.

Myths and Continued Underrepresentation

Over the 25 years I’ve reported on female filmmakers, I’ve interviewed two generations of movie executives. Most, but not all, were male. Most took seriously my questions about the apparent exclusion of women behind the camera, both on the screen and their forthcoming line-up.

Without exception, all of them retold one or more of the “Three Hollywood Myths.”

Myth #1) “Women don’t want to direct action movies and those are the films which are making money.”

Untrue. See: Martha Coolidge’s “Real Genius” (1985), Kathryn Bigelow’s “Point Break” (1991), Mimi Leder’s “The Peacemaker” (1997) and “Deep Impact” (1998), Lexi Alexander’s “Punisher: War Zone” (2008), and Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” (2009) and “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012).

What is true is that Patty Jenkins was hired to direct “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) and left due to creative differences. She is now working on the forthcoming “Wonder Woman.”

What is true is that Mira Nair was offered a “Harry Potter” film and chose instead to make the family drama “The Namesake” because the material was more important to her, and that Ava DuVernay was offered “Black Panther,” the film version of the Marvel Comics series, and declined for similar reasons.

Myth #2) “Movies by women don’t make money.”

Untrue again. Some movies by women don’t make back their investment, just as some movies by men do not. What is true is that many movies by women make major bank. Catherine Hardwicke’s little $37 million film “Twilight” grossed $393 million and launched a billion-dollar franchise.

Hardwicke told me by phone that she hears all the time from studios that films by women are poor investments. “And every time you say, ‘Well, this one made money, that one made money,’ they say, ‘This one made money because it was based on a best-selling book,’ or ‘That one made money because of its hot actress.’”

Here are six more films by women and their box-office grosses. They made money because they powerfully connected with audiences.

Bend it Like Beckham” (Gurinder Chadha). Cost: $6 million/Gross: $77 million“Frida” (Julie Taymor). Cost: $12 million/Gross: $56 million“Frozen” (Jennifer Lee). Cost: $150 million/Gross: $1.2 billion“The Proposal” (Anne Fletcher). Cost: $40 million/Gross: $317 million“Selma” (Ava DuVernay). Cost: $20 million/Gross $67 million“Lost in Translation” (Sofia Coppola). Cost: $4 million/Gross $120 million

Myth #3) “A woman behind the camera means women on the screen and no men in the audience.”

Untrue, if taken literally. Sometimes movies by women have a lower percentage of men in the audience, just as sometimes movies by men have a lower percentage of women in the audience. Take, for example, the 2015 films, “Bridge of Spies” by Steven Spielberg and “The Intern” by Nancy Meyers.

According to Paul Dergarabedian of comScore, the research company’s “PostTrak” data shows the audience gender breakdown at “Bridge of Spies,” a ’60s-era political thriller starring Tom Hanks, was 54 percent male and 46 percent female. For “The Intern,” a contemporary workplace comedy co-starring Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro, it was 41 percent male and 59 percent female. Spielberg’s film grossed $165 million; Meyers’ $194 million. His budget was $40 million; hers was $35 million.

Ava DuVernay’s “Selma,” the story of the 1965 march for voting rights led by Martin Luther King and starring David Oyelowo, had an audience gender breakdown of 47 percent male and 53 percent female. The assumption that movies come gendered with a blue or pink ribbon is a canard that still lingers in Hollywood, perhaps a vestige of the target marketing that began in the 1980s.

Speaking from the set of “Queen Sugar” in 2016, DuVernay observed, “We’re in a place right now where every other film is about a comic book superhero. We’re top-heavy with testosterone.”

How did Hollywood, a century ago a place where female directors thrived and prospered, come to this?

Stacy Title, director of “The Last Supper” and “The Bye Bye Man,” points the finger at “unconscious bias.”

Mira Nair, who was born in India, suspects chauvinism. “I’ve always remarked at the irony that the percentage of female directors is higher in India than in the United States,” she explained in a phone conversation. “India is supposed to be the traditional chauvinist culture,” she observes. Nair wonders if the historic examples of female prime ministers in South Asia — Indira Gandhi in India, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan — may have broken the glass ceiling for all professional women there. “Their examples don’t exist in the U.S.”

DuVernay looks forward to the outcome — and hoped-for positive resolution — of the Eeoc investigation. “It’s a systematic problem and it requires radical change,” she said. “If it’s not happening organically, systems should be put in place.” Like many female filmmakers, DuVernay hopes the Eeoc can reconfigure what Giese calls the “vertical playing field for women” into a level one.

“One thing I’m heartened by,” said Nair, who’s been making features for nearly 30 years, “is that the variety and confidence of female filmmakers today is inspiring.”

Do others think it’s changed for the better for women since the 1980s?

“For me, there’s no comparison between the ’80s and now,” reflected Nancy Meyers, whose six films as a director or writer/director have grossed more than a billion dollars. By email she wrote:

Men were still getting used to us being on set in the ’80s. (Men used to have photos of pinups on the set in the ’80s! I’m not kidding.)The only women around back then worked in costumes and hair and makeup. Today women are in every department and often department heads. There are still very few women in the camera department and that’s a shame. That seems to still be a real boy’s club. Today, most crew members are far more comfortable working for and with women.

Yet one thing has not changed: “Now, getting the job to be the director — that’s still an uphill battle,” Meyers said.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Iron Fist’ Almost Cast Lewis Tan in Lead Role

  • Indiewire
‘Iron Fist’ Almost Cast Lewis Tan in Lead Role
The widely criticized decision to cast a white actor in the lead role of Marvel and Netflix’s “Iron Fist” became even more frustrating on Tuesday when Asian-American actor Lewis Tan revealed he had originally auditioned for the part before landing a minor role in the series.

Read More: ‘Iron Fist’ Star Finn Jones Punches Back at Negative Reviews

Tan recently told Vulture that he was in consideration to play Danny Rand before taking the role of the villain Zhou Cheng, who appears in one episode of the 13-episode series. Many fans of the original comic book character had lobbied Marvel to cast an Asian or Asian-American actor in the role, which would have marked the first Asian-American superhero to appear onscreen. “Game of Thrones” actor Finn Jones plays Rand in the series.

Punisher: War Zone” filmmaker and former World Karate and Kickboxing Champion Lexi Alexander weighed in on the situation on Twitter on Monday.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Iron Fist’ Almost Cast Lewis Tan in Lead Role

‘Iron Fist’ Almost Cast Lewis Tan in Lead Role
The widely criticized decision to cast a white actor in the lead role of Marvel and Netflix’s “Iron Fist” became even more frustrating on Tuesday when Asian-American actor Lewis Tan revealed he had originally auditioned for the part before landing a minor role in the series.

Read More: ‘Iron Fist’ Star Finn Jones Punches Back at Negative Reviews

Tan recently told Vulture that he was in consideration to play Danny Rand before taking the role of the villain Zhou Cheng, who appears in one episode of the 13-episode series. Many fans of the original comic book character had lobbied Marvel to cast an Asian or Asian-American actor in the role, which would have marked the first Asian-American superhero to appear onscreen. “Game of Thrones” actor Finn Jones plays Rand in the series.

Punisher: War Zone” filmmaker and former World Karate and Kickboxing Champion Lexi Alexander weighed in on the situation on Twitter on Monday.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Chicago Cubs 2016 World Series Win Is Becoming a Movie

  • MovieWeb
After making history last fall as part of the Chicago Cubs' curse-breaking World Series win, retired catcher David Ross is now helping bring this epic story to the big screen. Radar Pictures has acquired David Ross' upcoming memoir, Teammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, which he co-wrote with sportswriter Don Yeager, for a big-screen movie adaptation. While the book will touch upon his successful 15-year career as a major league catcher, it will largely focus on the Chicago Cubs' improbable comeback win, the team's first since 1908.

The Hollywood Reporter reveals that the movie will go under the shortened title Teammate: My Life in Baseball, based on the book that will be published on May 9 by Hachette Books. Ram Getz and John Corcoran (Whisper of the Wolves) will write the adapted screenplay based on this book. Ram Getz is also producing with Radar Pictures' Ted Field,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Punisher, and the story of the unmade movie

Tony Sokol Jan 1, 2017

Sons of Anarchy and Wired Karl Sutter has been chatting about his The Punisher movie script that never got made...

Marvel’s The Punisher is a killing machine bent on revenge. He watched as his family became collateral damage in a mob war and vowed to wipe out organised crime. He didn’t have a badge, but was a battle trained ex-Marine with a full arsenal of killing skills.

The Punisher, created by writer Gerry Conway and artist John Romita, Sr. for Marvel Comics, first tortured readers in The Amazing Spider-Man. He was initially brought to life on the big screen by Dolph Lundgren in 1989 and was played by Thomas Jane in the 2004 film The Punisher. A sequel, The Punisher 2, was written by Kurt Sutter, the creator of Sons of Anarchy who was writing for The Shield on FX at the time. Sutter’s script was shelved
See full article at Den of Geek »

Kurt Sutter Spills The Beans On His Scrapped Punisher Script

Cast your mind back almost a decade ago, long before Jon Bernthal’s Frank Castle stormed onto the scene via Netflix’s Daredevil series, and you’ll arrive at a point in time when The Punisher was struggling to make much of a lasting impression on the silver screen.

Despite efforts from Jonathan Hensleigh and later Lexi Alexander, the famed Marvel anti-hero proved a difficult butterfly to pin, though things would have panned out differently had Kurt Sutter’s original pitch received the green light from Marvel. Reflecting on his scrapped script in a chat with Looper (via Screen Rant), Sutter noted that his idea for The Punisher 2 – which later became Punisher: War Zone – was designed to “expand the Marvel Universe in a direction it should not have been expanded in.”

Sutter, whose writing credits include The Shield, Sons of Anarchy, The Bastard Executioner, begins by recounting his own history with Marvel.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Mom from ‘7th Heaven’ minces no words when talking about the reality of a reunion

  • Hitfix
Mom from ‘7th Heaven’ minces no words when talking about the reality of a reunion
I find TMZ...odd. And why they decided to follow actor Catherine Hicks after she got her nails done is beyond me, but what started as a light conversation about a possible 7th Heaven reunion quickly brought up a more serious and important issue. Hicks, along with cast members Beverley Mitchell, Jessica Biel, Barry Watson, and Mackenzie Rosman shared a photo of a casual reunion back in February and Biel more recently shared an old photo of her and Mitchell on Instagram. TMZ asked Hicks if she still considers the women family and she said "of course." They went on to ask, considering projects like Girl Meets World and Fuller House, if there might be a 7th Heaven reunion down the road. "I don't know," she said, "I mean we'd have to open with Stephen's coffin." If only everyone could be so straightforward about how to treat harassers and abusers?
See full article at Hitfix »

Lexi Alexander To Direct ‘Crossface’ About Wrestler Turned Murderer Chris Benoit

  • Slash Film
Lexi Alexander To Direct ‘Crossface’ About Wrestler Turned Murderer Chris Benoit
Green Street Hooligans/Punisher: War Zone director Lexi Alexander has signed on to direct a feature film about former professional wrestler Chris Benoit. The biographical thriller will be based on Matthew Randazzo V‘s book Ring of Hell: The Story of Chris Benoit and the Fall of the Pro Wrestling Industry, and tell the story of the famous […]

The post Lexi Alexander To Direct ‘Crossface’ About Wrestler Turned Murderer Chris Benoit appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Crossface: Chris Benoit biopic gets its director

Mike Cecchini Sep 12, 2016

Lexi Alexander will direct the Chris Benoit movie, Crossface.

Lexi Alexander (Punisher: War Zone, recent episodes of Arrow and Supergirl) has signed on as director of Crossface, the story of wrestler Chris Benoit, who murdered his wife and child before taking his own life in 2007.

Jake Goldberger and Sarah Coulter are writing the screenplay for Crossface, based on Matthew Randazzo V's book Ring of Hell: The Story Of Chris Benoit & The Fall Of The Pro Wrestling Industry. Randazzo will executive produce with Ram Getz. Alex A Letz and Tony Lee are producing.

“I was pretty certain I’d stay in TV rather than returning to the feature world, because the material just seems so much better in TV, especially in drama, but then Crossface came my way,” Alexander said (via Variety). “A heartbreaking, true story about the dark side of wrestling. … I couldn’t say no to that.
See full article at Den of Geek »
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