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Gasparilla Ff: Rosie Perez on ‘Puerto Ricans in Paris,’ Latinos in Hollywood, and 'Fearless'

Forging a career out unforgettable performances in both independent classics and studio fare as well countless television roles, Rosie Perez is one of the most successful and well-regarding Latina actresses working in the tumultuous entertainment industry. Her unquestionable talent has helped her surpass the unspoken and hindering stereotypes that plague Hollywood, and though the road has been anything but easy, her prolific body of work speaks for itself.

Perez recently attended the Gasparilla International Film Festival in Tampa to support the film “Puerto Ricans in Paris, “ in which she appears alongside Luis Guzmán , Rosario Dawson, and Edgar Garcia.

We sat down with her to discuss the humorous caper about two Puerto Rican American detectives solving a case in the European capital, her perception on diversity in Hollywood, and how “Fearless” became a surprising success that earned her an Academy Award nomination.

Carlos Aguilar: “Puerto Ricans in Paris” is a project that literally has some of the biggest Puerto Rican talent in Hollywood gathered in one film. How did your involvement with the project come about? I understand you are friends with the mastermind behind the film Luis Guzmán.

Rosie Perez: Louie just called me up and he said, “Mija, I need a favor” [Laughs]. I said, “Ok, that means no money,” and he just started laughing [Laughs]. I said, “Whatever it is you got it. What is it?” Then he said, “Oh it’s this movie that means so much to me.” I went, “Oh shit, send me the script firs!" [Laughs]. He did and I thought it was funny, so I said I’ll do it. That was it. It was as simple as that. There was no agents involved, no managers, it was just that phone call. Later he did forwarded the script to my agent, but literally it was that simple.

Aguilar: Seems like it was one of those rare cases when things work out easily in Hollywood thanks to good relationships and friendships.

Rosie Perez: Yes, that’s very rare.

Aguilar: What did you find appealing about this story? It’s definitely a fish out of water tale about these two men from New York in a culturally foreign environment . Was it simple the fact that it's quite funny, the themes within it, or was it because you knew everyone involved?

Rosie Perez: It’s a little bit of all the above, but I think mainly it was that it was funny and secondly I would say that it’s about friendship and family, so I liked that. I just couldn’t wait to see the club scene. You first see it on paper, but I was like, “Oh I gotta see this!” [Laughs]. It’s a comedy about being someone’s friend and being family, that’s what drew me to it.

Aguilar: You've had a prolific career between your work in television and incredibly memorable film roles. At this point in you career how do you decide what is a role you want to pursue, in particular with Hollywood still unwilling to create more roles for people outside their mold?

Rosie Perez: If it hits me right and if it’s not insulting then I consider it, because as you know, most recently with the Oscars controversy, Hollywood is tough for people of color. When they say, “We are going to create more roles for people of color,” they are stereotypical roles and they are insulting roles, and we are like, “That’s not it people.” I’m going on almost 30 years, I’m lucky and I’m very grateful, but it’s still not a walk in the park. I think it is also because I’m choosy with roles. I’m at an age where I don’t want to do something if I don’t have to do it. Even with the TV show, I had enough. I did it for a year, I was contracted for three years, and I said, “No, I don’t want to do this anymore.” That’s what happens when you get older, you get to that point. You want to enjoy life. You want life to be good. At the end of the day you don’t want to think, “What the hell was I doing?” [Laughs]. “Why did I do this?” or “Why didn’t I walk away from that?" Or “Why did I accept that?” That’s how my decision-making works. With this film I really liked that all my scenes were in New York because I like to stay home a lot. I’m a homebody. I’m a girl who was in the clubs since I was 14-years-old, I’m done with that, I’m over it [Laughs].

Aguilar: It’s definitely important to know when to say no.

Rosie Perez: Exactly, and I say no. I say no a lot. I’m grateful that work still comes my way. Forget about me being of color, I’m a woman. Then when you are over 40, you are like, “Oh shit,” you know? [Laughs].

Aguilar: Hollywood seems to pile on these barriers on people. Being a woman of color over 40 is disgracefully a no-go for studios. Is't insane to think we haven't gotten over all those prejudices, why do you think that's still the case?

Rosie Perez: Because it’s still a male-dominated industry. That said, I have to repeat myself, I’m very fortunate because I know a lot of actresses that are super talented that just don’t get work. They don’t get the offers, they don’t get the auditions, they don’t get the opportunities, and it’s so unfair. I’m really not complaining.

Aguilar: You were were nominated for an Academy Award for “Fearless" back in the 90s, considering the recent Oscar controversy and the state of diversity in Hollywood, how difficult was it to make that happen from getting the role to getting the industry's attention back then?

Rosie Perez: I think “Fearless” happened not because of Hollywood. Hollywood didn’t believe in it. They threw their marketing dollars on a different film. But when the Berlin Film Festival picked up the movie and said, "This was exquisite," and everyone was throwing awards at us, I think that's when the Academy was like, "Wait a minute what is this film." We went over to Europe and it was a smash hit. We'd drive down Champs Élysées and we'd see the movie poster for "Fearless," and I'd go, "Oh my God. This is a dream." I really thought I was in a fairytale. That had never happened to me. I found out about the Oscar nomination while we were still in Berlin. I think that's what happened.

It's wonderful on one end and on the other end it was unfortunate that it took Europe to make America say, "Oh this is a good film and there are really good performances in it." This is one of the instances where the role was not insulting, it wasn't stereotypical, and it wasn't for a Puerto Rican American. I had to fight for it. I think I was like the 80th-something person they had seen. They kept saying, "No, no, no she is not right." All they kept thinking was "White Men Can't Jump." My agents at the time were like, "Just give her a chance," and the director was not from America so he didn't have any prejudices or preconceived notions of what I could do or who I was. I had to do four call backs, and I did it. I didn't complaint not one bit. When you really want something in life you work for it. You go through the mud. Being at the Oscars was great as well was the Golden Globes. That's what I mean when I say I'm not complaining.

Aguilar: iI's strange and unfortunate that sometimes there is a need for outside sources to validate the quality of a film rather than just looking at the performances and the quality of the material.

Rosie Perez: I don't think that's the case all the time, but it is the case sometimes and that's unfortunate. I just have hope for the Academy. I have hope for Hollywood. I'm a very hopeful person in general. Things will change, but it's not about just one minority group. Asians and Native Americans get it the worst and nobody is rooting for them. Let's hope it changes for everyone. That's what I would like to see.

Aguilar: In "Puerto Ricans in Paris" the two Puerto Rican leads are detectives. They are not stereotypical roles that are usually assigned to Latino talent or secondary characters to a white lead. Do you think this has to do with the fact that a big part of the creative talent was Latino?

Rosie Perez: Yes! Louie had to do his own thing. He got the screenwriter with whom he had done "How to Make it in America." Louie is a very forward-thinking person and I hope with this film people start recognizing that. I knew it when I first met him. He was like, "We gotta stick together mama. We are gonna change things," and I was like, "I believe you." Everybody was like,"Nah," but I was like," I believe you," because he said it with such fortitude. And he did it right because in this film I play a middle-class wife. That could have been anybody. It could have been "White People in Paris," "Black People in Paris," or "Asian People in Paris." It could have been anything but it was "Puerto Ricans in Paris" because a Puerto Rican American actor took the initiative and said "I'm going to make this movie and I'm gonna show them that we are just like you. We are not a novelty. We are human beings." That's why this is a great thing. It really is. It came off like a commercial film, but I was pleasantly surprised

Aguilar: But definitely the fact that is a commercial film will help it cross over to any audience. It doesn't have to be just a "Latino film."

Rosie Perez: Thats right!.

Aguilar: Would you say in order to see significant change in the way opportunities are created and offered, we, as minorities, have to create our own opportunities or what would be the best approach?

Rosie Perez: I think you do have to create your own opportunities, but you also have to fight to have opportunities being created for you by the studios. You can't just fight that one fight, you have to fight the good fight and that means covering all the basis. Things are changing, but it is unfortunate that we are still at this point. Things have gotten better but sometimes we take one step forward and two steps back.

Aguilar: "Puerto Ricans in Paris" is going to be released later this year, but you already have several other upcoming projects. Can you tell about your recent role in Maris Curran's film and what other adventures you are embarking on?

Rosie Perez: Well "Five Nights in Maine" was another film that the director didn't see me for but she wanted to meet me, which was weird. I thought, "Why do you want to meet me if you don't see me for the role," but I was like, "Ok I'll meet you whatever." We sat down and we talked and after our luncheon she called Diane Wiest and said, "I think I found the nurse and its Rosie Perez," Diane Wiest just went, "Wonderful!" It was that simple. She wasn't like, "Really?" It's a very dark film. It's beautifully shot, it's very moody, David Oyelowo is excellent in it and so is Diane Wiest. It's a very quiet film, and for it to be so dark there is a ll of light in it. There is a lot of outdoors shots and the house is bright in Maine. I'm glad people have responded to it.

Right now I'm just ping-ponging around between projects. I'm producing a project with Edward Norton's company with executive producer Bill Migliore. It's very exciting to me and very challenging to me because Bill and Edward are very challenging people. They don't want to take one step forward until something is right. Right now we are writing the script. We thought we were done and I said, "We thought you said yes to the script," then they went, "Yeah but now comes the real work." It's been a mind-blowing experience. I'm writing and producing but I'm not acting in it. I'm behind the scenes this time. Louie is attached and so is Zoe Saldana. But right now is all about the script. I get excited because I feel stimulated. When you get off the phone and you just had a four hour script meeting and you are like, "What time is it? Oh my God I have to make dinner for my husband. We've been on the phone for four hours? Are you kidding me?" and you don't feel exhausted, you feel invigorated and you can't wait to go back and star writing off of the notes, it's special. We haven't even made the damn movie and it's just been such a special experience for me. It really has.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Casey Affleck’s ‘Manchester by the Sea’ Closes International Sales

Casey Affleck’s ‘Manchester by the Sea’ Closes International Sales
Sierra/Affinity has completed sales of worldwide rights outside of North America to Sundance hit “Manchester by the Sea,” starring Casey Affleck and Michelle Williams with Kenneth Lonergan directing.

Amazon acquired the North America distribution rights to the film, which were represented by Wme Global, and will release it with an Oscar campaign in the fall.

Universal acquired the rights in Australia, New Zealand, Benelux, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, India, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore. Studio Canal bought the U.K. rights.

Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions acquired Latin America, Scandinavia, Iceland, Baltics, Hungary, Poland and Romania. Able Entertainment took South Korea and Golden Scene bought Hong Kong.

Set in the north shore of Massachusetts, “Manchester by the Sea” tells the story of a working class family in which Affleck’s brother (Kyle Chandler) suddenly dies and he is made the legal guardian of his nephew — and forced to deal
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sierra/Affinity closes international sales on 'Manchester By The Sea'

  • ScreenDaily
Sierra/Affinity closes international sales on 'Manchester By The Sea'
Kenneth Lonergan’s acclaimed Sundance Premieres selection has sold out around the world as Nick Meyer and his team concluded a string of deals including a multi-territory pact with Universal Pictures International Productions.

After Amazon Studios stumped up $10m for North American rights following the drama’s world premiere in Park City, Universal has acquired rights for Australia, New Zealand, Benelux, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, India, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam, Middle East, and Cis.

Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions got behind Manchester By The Sea when Sierra/Affinity commenced pre-sales at the Efm in 2015 and will distribute in Latin America, Scandinavia, Iceland, Asian pay TV, Baltics, Czech/Slovak, former-Yugoslavia, Hungary, Poland, and Romania.

Manchester By The Sea: Screen’s Sundance review

Kenneth Lonergan interview

UK rights have gone to Studio Canal, South Africa to Ster Kinekor, South Korea to Able Entertainment, Taiwan to Caichange International, Hong Kong to Golden Scene, Thailand to M Pictures
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sierra/Affinity closes international sales on 'Manchester'

  • ScreenDaily
Sierra/Affinity closes international sales on 'Manchester'
Kenneth Lonergan’s acclaimed Sundance Premieres selection has sold out around the world as Nick Meyer and his team concluded a string of deals including a multi-territory pact with Universal Pictures International Production.

After Amazon Studios stumped up $10m for North American rights following the drama’s world premiere in Park City, Universal has acquired rights for Australia, New Zealand, Benelux, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, India, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam, Middle East, and Cis.

Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions got behind Manchester By The Sea when Sierra/Affinity commenced pre-sales at the Efm in 2015 and will distribute in Latin America, Scandinavia, Iceland, Asian pay TV, Baltics, Czech/Slovak, former-Yugoslavia, Hungary, Poland, and Romania.

UK rights have gone to Studio Canal, South Africa to Ster Kinekor, South Korea to Able Entertainment, Taiwan to Caichange International, Hong Kong to Golden Scene, Thailand to M Pictures, Portugal to Lusomundo, Switzerland to Ascot Elite, Israel to United
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Netflix to Debut 'My Own Man' from Producer Edward Norton

  • MovieWeb
Netflix to Debut 'My Own Man' from Producer Edward Norton
Netflix, the world's leading Internet TV network, will premiere the original documentary My Own Man, from executive producer Edward Norton, on March 6, 2015. The film was written, produced and directed by David Sampliner (Dirty Work), and will premiere exclusively on Netflix in all territories where Netflix is available.

When director Sampliner learns he's about to become a father to a baby boy, he fears he must "man up" and finally embrace the latent masculinity he's rejected all his life. But as he immerses himself in a strange new world of masculine ideals, including vocal lessons, warrior weekends and hunting, he realizes all roads lead back to his own fraught relationship with his father. Intimate, funny and moving, My Own Man reveals the sometimes painful truths that are often left unspoken between fathers and sons. The film made its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival in April 2014.

Here's what Lisa Nishimura, Netflix
See full article at MovieWeb »

Edward Norton-Produced Documentary ‘My Own Man’ Gets Netflix Premiere Date

  • The Wrap
Edward Norton-Produced Documentary ‘My Own Man’ Gets Netflix Premiere Date
Edward Norton documentary “My Own Man” is set to premiere March 6 on Netflix. The film was written, produced and directed by David Sampliner.

Also Read: Roger Ebert Remembered in ‘Life Itself': 15 Excerpts From His Most Legendary Reviews

The doc, which debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival in April, follows Sampliner, who learns he’s about to become a father to a baby boy, and fears he must “man up” and finally embrace the latent masculinity he’s rejected all his life, according to a press release.

But as Sampliner immerses himself in a strange new world of masculine ideals,
See full article at The Wrap »

RatPac, Edward Norton’s Class 5 Options ‘American Hippopotamus’

  • Deadline
RatPac, Edward Norton’s Class 5 Options ‘American Hippopotamus’
Exclusive: Brett Ratner and James Packer’s RatPac Entertainment have acquired the Jon Mooallem article American Hippopotamus for Class 5 Films and RatPac for a feature film. Class 5′s Edward Norton and William Migliore will produce with RatPac’s Ratner. They will frame a feature around a difficult-to-believe but true story. Responding to a meat shortage in the U.S. in 1910, two bitter enemies joined forces to try and import hippopotamuses to the swamps of Louisiana and convince Americans to eat them. Even though Theodore Roosevelt and The New York Times endorsed the plan, the fact that you don’t find hippo on the menu shows how well their campaign fared. Key to the movie is the rivalry of the hippo duo, both of whom were spies. Frederick Russell Burnham was a frontiersman and freelance adventurer whose exploits were the inspiration for the Boy Scouts, and he teamed with Fritz Duquesne,
See full article at Deadline »

Edward Norton To Helm "Motherless Brooklyn"

  • Dark Horizons
Edward Norton is set to star in and direct "Motherless Brooklyn" for RatPac Entertainment. Filming is expected to begin late this year in New York.

Norton also penned this loose adaptation of the Jonathan Lethem novel which moves the action from the contemporary times of the book to a New York 1954 setting.

Norton will play Lionel Essrog, a lonely and obsessive private detective afflicted with Tourette’s syndrome. As he tries to solve the murder of his mentor and only friend, he unravels closely guarded secrets that have major ramifications.

Ratner, Norton and William Migliore will produce.

Source: Deadline
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Edward Norton Will Helm Passion Project ‘Motherless Brooklyn’ With RatPac Funding

  • Deadline
Edward Norton Will Helm Passion Project ‘Motherless Brooklyn’ With RatPac Funding
Exclusive: It may have taken him 15 years to get there, but Edward Norton will star in and direct Motherless Brooklyn, his scripted adaptation inspired by the Jonathan Lethem novel. Brett Ratner and James Packer’s RatPac Entertainment have stepped up to fully finance the film for a late 2014 production start in New York. Ratner will join Norton and his Class 5 Films’ cohort William Migliore as producers, and Packer will be executive producer with Class 5’s Stuart Blumberg. While Lethem’s novel is contemporary, Norton has set the story in New York in 1954, a time of great change in the city. He plays Lionel Essrog, a lonely private detective afflicted with Tourette’s syndrome, who tries to solve the murder of his mentor and only friend. Armed only with few clues and an obsessive mind, Lionel slowly unravels closely guarded secrets that have major ramifications. It leads him through Harlem jazz clubs,
See full article at Deadline »

Interview: A conversation with Stuart Blumberg, director of Thanks for Sharing

We chat with filmmaker Stuart Blumberg about his directorial debut Thanks for Sharing, starring Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow, Josh Gad, Joely Richardson and Alecia Moore...

Q: Tell us about Thanks for Sharing...

Stuart Blumberg: Thanks for Sharing is the story of 3 men who are in a 12 step recovery program for sex addiction in New York City and it tells the story of how through their friendship and their fellowship and their struggles, they help each other recover and be the best people they can be.

Q: Can you walk us through each storyline?

Sb: Sure. There is the character that Mark Ruffalo plays, named Adam, and Adam is a successful environment consultant who has been in the program for about 5 years. And he had a really sort of tough, checkered past, full of lots of sort of dark stuff and when he got into the program he
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Ted’ Producer Sets Up Switched-at-Birth Comedy

‘Ted’ Producer Sets Up Switched-at-Birth Comedy
Stuart Blumberg (“The Kids Are All Right”) has sold a comedy pitch to New Line with Scott Stuber (“Ted”) of Bluegrass Pictures and the Maven Pictures team of Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler on board to produce.

Story centers around two families — a blue-state liberal and a red-state conservative — discovering they have been raising the other’s son since they were accidentally switched 17 years ago.

Blumberg was nominated for an Oscar for screenplay for “Kids” and made his directorial debut in “Thanks for Sharing,” starring Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow. Rattray was a producer on “Kids.”

Edward Norton and Bill Migliore of Class Five Films are executive producing. Richard Brener and Michael Disco will oversee for New Line.

New was first reported by Deadline.com.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Kids Are All Right’ Scribe Stuart Blumberg Makes Comedy Pitch Deal At New Line

  • Deadline
Exclusive: Stuart Blumberg has sold an original comedy pitch to New Line Cinema with Scott Stuber and Maven Pictures duo Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler producing. The untitled comedy centers around two very different families, one a blue-state liberal, the other a red-state conservative, who discover that they have been raising the other’s son since they were switched by accident 17 years ago. Blumberg scripted The Kids Are All Right, for which he got an Oscar nom, and he made his directing debut on the sex addiction tale Thanks For Sharing with Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow. Stuber will produce through his Bluegrass Films banner and Styler and Rattray through Maven Pictures. Blumberg’s Class 5 Films cohorts Edward Norton and Bill Migliore are exec producing. This is a reunion between Rattray and Blumberg, who collaborated on The Kids Are All Right. New Line’s Richard Brener and Michael Disco are overseeing for New Line.
See full article at Deadline »

2 New Thanks For Sharing clips

Watch fresh clips from Thanks for Sharing, starring Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow. The Lionsgate romantic comedy opens in theaters on September 20th, 2013, and also stars Josh Gad, Alecia Moore and Tim Robbins. Stuart Blumberg directs from a script he wrote with Matt Wilson, this the comic and deeply moving look at a new kind of modern family, as a group of friends in recovery learns to face life together with heart, humor and humility. Gary Gilbert, William Migliore and David Koplan produce.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Toronto 2012: Lionsgate and Roadside Attractions Team on 'Thanks For Sharing'

  • Indiewire
Lionsgate has bought Stuart Blumberg's sex addiction dramedy "Thanks For Sharing" starring Mark Ruffalo, Gwyneth Paltrow and Tim Robbins. The Toronto International Film Festival world premiere will be a joint theatrical release by Lionsgate and sister company Roadside Attractions. The directorial debut of Blumberg from a script he wrote with Matt Winston, the film was produced by Class 5 FilmsWilliam Migliore and David Koplan, and Olympus PicturesLeslie Urdang, Dean Vanech, and Miranda de Pencier. Edward Norton executive produced through Class 5. The deal was negotiated on behalf of Lionsgate by Jason Constantine, president of acquisitions and co-productions, with Eda Kowan, senior VP of acquisitions and Wendy Jaffe, executive VP of business and legal affairs. UTA Independent Film Group and Wme Global brokered the sale of the film.
See full article at Indiewire »

Pink likes 'Sharing'

American singer-songwriter Alecia Beth Moore, better known as Pink, has joined the cast of Olympus Pictures and Class 5 Films' independent comedy "Thanks for Sharing."According to Variety, the film marks the directorial debut of Stuart Blumberg, who was nominated for an Oscar for co-writing "The Kids Are All Right."Blumberg co-wrote the 'Sharing' screenplay with Matt Winston.Tim Robbins, Mark Ruffalo, Gwyneth Paltrow, Joely Richardson, Patrick Fugit and Josh Gad have also been cast.Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech and Miranda de Pencier will produce for Olympus, while William Migliore and David Koplan will produce for Class 5.The story focuses on a group of men developing friendships while in a 12-step program for recovering sex addicts.Production is underway in New York.Pink's other film credits
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Blumberg Sex Addiction Dramedy Thank You for Sharing: Cast includes Paltrow, Pink, Ruffalo, Robbins

Blumberg Sex Addiction Dramedy Thank You for Sharing: Cast includes Paltrow, Pink, Ruffalo, Robbins
Writer-director Stuart Blumberg's (co-writer of The Kids are All Right; pictured top left) will bring his Thanks for Sharing to life with Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow, Patrick Fugit, Joely Richardson, Josh Gad and the newest cast member, Alecia Moore (a.k.a. Pink). The film is currently shooting in New York City, and follows a group of "unlikely friends brought together through their shared determination to recover from sex addiction and forge meaningful relationships for the first time in their lives." The dramatic comedy is produced by William Migliore and David Koplan (Class 5 Films, of which Blumberg is a partner), as well as Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech and Miranda de Pencier (Olympus Pictures, which is financing the film). Edward Norton is executive producer.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Pink Joins Thanks for Sharing

  • MovieWeb
Pink Joins Thanks for Sharing
Class 5 Films and Olympus Pictures announced today that Alecia Moore (Aka Pink) has been brought on board to co-star in writer/director Stuart Blumberg's dramedy Thanks for Sharing. Blumberg, who was previously nominated for a 2010 Academy Award for his The Kids Are All Right screenplay, will direct Moore in an ensemble cast that also includes Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow, Joely Richardson, Patrick Fugit and Josh Gad. Principal photography for Thanks for Sharing began in New York City in late September, and Moore joins the cast today.

The project is being produced by Bill Migliore and David Koplan for Class 5 Films, where Blumberg also serves as partner, and Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech and Miranda de Pencier for Olympus Pictures, which is solely financing the film. Edward Norton will serve as executive producer.

Thanks for Sharing is a dramatic comedy about a group of unlikely friends brought
See full article at MovieWeb »

Alecia Moore Joins Blumberg's Thanks for Sharing

Class 5 Films and Olympus Pictures announced today that Alecia Moore (Aka P!nk) has been brought on board to co-star in writer/director Stuart Blumberg's dramedy Thanks for Sharing . Blumberg, who was previously nominated for a 2010 Academy Award for his The Kids Are All Right screenplay, will direct Moore in an ensemble cast that also includes Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow, Joely Richardson, Patrick Fugit and Josh Gad. Principal photography for Thanks for Sharing began in New York City in late September, and Moore joins the cast today. The project is being produced by William Migliore and David Koplan for Class 5 Films, where Blumberg also serves as partner, and Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech and Miranda de Pencier for Olympus Pictures, which is solely financing the...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Alecia Moore a.k.a. Pink joins Thanks For Sharing

Thanks for Sharing casts Pink with Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow and Joely Richardson. Alecia Moore (Pink) has jumped on board her first movie role in Stuart Blumberg's Thanks for Sharing, a dramedy focusing on a group of recovering sex addicts. Moore will play Dede who bonds with Josh Gad's character. Blumberg wrote the critically-acclaimed The Kids Are All Right, also starring Mark Ruffalo, and helms and scripts here. Class 5 Films' William Migliore and David Koplan produce Thanks for Sharing alongside Blumberg as well as Olympis Pictures' Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech and Miranda de Pencier.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Alecia Moore a.k.a. Pink joins Thanks For Sharing

Thanks for Sharing casts Pink with Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow and Joely Richardson. Alecia Moore (Pink) has jumped on board her first movie role in Stuart Blumberg's Thanks for Sharing, a dramedy focusing on a group of recovering sex addicts. Moore will play Dede who bonds with Josh Gad's character. Blumberg wrote the critically-acclaimed The Kids Are All Right, also starring Mark Ruffalo, and helms and scripts here. Class 5 Films' William Migliore and David Koplan produce Thanks for Sharing alongside Blumberg as well as Olympis Pictures' Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech and Miranda de Pencier.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »
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