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Sid Melton Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Trivia (9) | Personal Quotes (1) | Salary (3)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 22 May 1917Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA
Date of Death 3 November 2011Burbank, California, USA  (pneumonia)
Birth NameSidney Meltzer
Height 5' 4" (1.63 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Sid Melton was born on May 22, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA as Sidney Meltzer. He was an actor, known for Make Room for Daddy (1953), Lady Sings the Blues (1972) and The Steel Helmet (1951). He died on November 3, 2011 in Burbank, California, USA.

Trivia (9)

Younger brother of screenwriter Lewis Meltzer.
Provided long-standing comic relief for Danny Thomas on his classic TV show as Charlie Halper, owner of the Copa Club where Danny performed. Eventually Pat Carroll was added to the cast playing Halper's wife Bunny. Frequently kidding with the press, he told reporters he got the part of Charlie because Sid was the only person Thomas could find that was homelier than he was.
His father, Isidore Meltzer, was a comedic actor in vaudeville and the Yiddish theater.
Melton recalls the beginnings of his career, and discusses the movie, Lost Continent (1951), in the book, "A Sci-Fi Swarm and Horror Horde" (McFarland & Co., 2010), by Tom Weaver.
Debuted on stage in 1939 in a touring production of "See My Lawyer" and appeared on Broadway in 1947 in "The Magic Touch".
Is interred at Hillside Memorial Park in Culver City, California.
Appeared in flashbacks as Estelle Getty's late husband on episodes of The Golden Girls (1985).
Was a semi-regular on the bucolic sitcom Green Acres (1965) as one-half of a bungling brother/sister carpenter team contracted to fix Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor's dilapidated farmhouse. Sid played Alf Monroe and Mary Grace Canfield played his sister Ralph.
His first Hollywood contract was with Lippert in 1949.

Personal Quotes (1)

For years I auditioned for producers and directors who would fall on the floor laughing, but then I'd never hear from them again. Go ask them why I'm not working. Believe me, there's a lot more to working steadily than being a name and delivering the laughs. There's a certain--let's call it kowtowing--that I'm not prepared to do.

Salary (3)

The Steel Helmet (1951) $140 /week
The Lemon Drop Kid (1951) $140 /week
Lost Continent (1951) $140 /week

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