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Scream Factory Blu-ray Reviews: The Poughkeepsie Tapes, Jackals, The Devil’S Candy

  • DailyDead
Besides releasing a number of our favorite classic horror films and the occasional cult oddity, the good folks at Scream Factory are also releasing a number of contemporary horror films and giving them a home on Blu-ray. Here’s a look at three of their recent efforts:

Ten years after it was slated for release, The Poughkeepsie Tapes is finally available on Blu-ray thanks to Scream Factory. Would that it had remained buried. A found-footage “documentary”-style horror film, it chronicles a serial killer who has videotaped all of his crimes. The film is pieced together through interviews with people familiar with the case, as well as footage taken by the killer himself. Imagine the video camera scene from Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, only stretched to feature length and repellant for totally different reasons.

The sequence in Henry works because the film has earned that moment and because
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10 Freddy Krueger Movies You Never Saw

10 Freddy Krueger Movies You Never Saw
Freddy Krueger is one of Halloween's most celebrated horror movie killers. A Nightmare on Elm Street, from the brilliant mind of the late fright master Wes Craven, is a stone cold classic. While the many sequels are a mixed bag, there's no disputing the greatness of A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors, or the bold adventurousness of Wes Craven's New Nightmare, which reimagined the entire franchise in a fascinating new way, years before "meta" became a trendy buzz word.

Jack Sholder put Freddy Krueger inside another dude, Renny Harlin put him in sunglasses, and Rachel Talalay nearly finished him off in Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare. Though he once hosted his own TV show and finally faced off with the killer of the Friday the 13th franchise in Freddy vs. Jason, there are still multiple Freddy Krueger projects that were in some stage of development that simply never got made.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Playback: Michael Rooker on ‘Guardians’ and the Evolution of Blockbusters and TV

Playback: Michael Rooker on ‘Guardians’ and the Evolution of Blockbusters and TV
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Two weeks into release “Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2” is still killing it at the box office. One of the film’s stars and highlights, Michael Rooker, is back from traveling around the world promoting the film and he’s in our studio this week to discuss the Marvel phenomenon and more.

Between “Guardians” and AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” Rooker has been exposed to a whole new set of fandom these last several years. He has certainly put in his time in the Hollywood blockbuster machine — witness particularly actioners of the 1990s like “Days of Thunder” and “Cliffhanger” — but being involved with these properties has brought him to a whole other level.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie News: Michael Rooker to Reunite With 'Serial Killer' Director; Julia Roberts to Star in 'The Bookseller'

A Good Man Is Hard to Find: Michael Rooker (Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, above) first broke out in the frightening Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer back in 1986. Now he will reteam with that movie's director, John McNaughton, to make A Good Man Is Hard to Find. It's based on Flannery O'Connor's chilling short story, first published in 1953, which revolves around a road trip and a family's fateful encounter with an escaped murderer. [Deadline]   The Bookseller: Set in the 1960s, Cynthia Swanson's novel The Bookseller concerns a woman who enjoys a rich fantasy life in her dreams, only to see the line between reality and imagination begin to merge. Julia Roberts (Money Monster, above) is now attached to star in and produce a big-screen version...

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News Briefs: Michael Rooker to Reunite with 'Serial Killer' Director

  • Fandango
A Good Man Is Hard to Find: Michael Rooker (Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, above) first broke out in the frightening Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer back in 1986. Now he will reteam with that movie's director, John McNaughton, to make A Good Man Is Hard to Find. It's based on Flannery O'Connor's chilling short story, first published in 1953, which revolves around a road trip and a family's fateful encounter with an escaped murderer. [Deadline]   The...

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See full article at Fandango »

Henry Duo Michael Rooker and John McNaughton Reteam for A Good Man Is Hard to Find

John McNaughton’s 1986 film Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, which was loosely based on the exploits on real life serial killers Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Toole, was an unflinching and terrifying look at just how evil we as… Continue Reading →

The post Henry Duo Michael Rooker and John McNaughton Reteam for A Good Man Is Hard to Find appeared first on Dread Central.
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Michael Rooker Reteams With His ‘Henry’ Director On ‘A Good Man Is Hard To Find’

Michael Rooker Reteams With His ‘Henry’ Director On ‘A Good Man Is Hard To Find’
Michael Rooker, of Guardians Of The Galaxy and The Walking Dead fame, is reuniting with his Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer director John McNaughton on a film adaptation of Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is Hard To Find. The Passion Of The Christ scribe Benedict Fitzgerald wrote the screenplay. The O’Conner story, a duel between The Grandmother and The Misfit, revisits familiar territory for Rooker and McNaughton; the author’s 1950s character The Misfit is cut from the…
See full article at Deadline »

Prevenge review – magnificently murderous mum-to-be

Alice Lowe directs and stars in this cracking tale of a pregnant woman who turns killer on the instructions of her unborn child

Alice Lowe makes a cracking directorial debut with this macabre, grittily low-budget and explicitly violent movie about a murderous pregnancy. It is a little like Sightseers, the black comedy she co-wrote and acted in for Ben Wheatley – but with fainter tint of queasy humour. It reminded me more of John McNaughton’s Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, or indeed the “impregnation” scene from Ridley Scott’s Alien.

Prevenge provides a nightmarish satirical twist on post- and antenatal depression. On first seeing this film in Venice last year, maybe addled by lagoon vapours or the disorientating horror of the film itself, I aired my own bizarre theory that the title was a riff on pre-emptive revenge: prevenge, pretaliation etc. It was gently pointed out to me that
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

December 6th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Phantasm: Ravager and Phantasm: Remastered

  • DailyDead
Tuesday, December 6th is a big day for Phantasm "phans," as you can finally bring home the remastered version of Don Coscarelli’s original film as well as Phantasm: Ravager in stunning HD, courtesy of Well Go USA. Cult movie enthusiasts should also be keeping an eye out for Mpi Home Video's 30th anniversary presentation of Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, as well as Kino Lorber’s Blu-ray of Doomwatch. We’re also seeing a handful of recent festival hits—Trash Fire, Jack Goes Home, and SiREN—coming home this Tuesday, and the first season of Scream Queens arrives on DVD, too.

Other notable releases for December 6th include The Possession Experiment, The Devil’s Dolls, and the Black & Chrome Edition of Mad Max: Fury Road.

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer: 30th Anniversary Collector’s Edition (Mpi Home Video, Blu-ray)

Undeniably one of the
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Henry, Portrait Of A Serial Killer Midnights This Weekend at The Moolah

“If you shoot someone in the head with a .45 every time you kill somebody, it becomes like your fingerprint, see? But if you strangle one, stab another, and one you cut up, and one you don’t, then the police don’t know what to do. They think you’re four different people. What they really want, what makes their job so much easier, is pattern. What they call a modus operandi. That’s Latin.”

Henry, Portrait Of A Serial Killer screens Midnights this weekend (November 18th and 19th) at The Moolah Theater and Lounge (3821 Lindell Blvd, St. Louis, Mo 63108) as part of Destroy the Brain’s monthly Late Night Grindhouse film series.

Read my interview with Michel Rooker, star of Henry, Portrait Of A Serial Killer Here

John McNaughton’s 1988 masterpiece Henry, Portrait Of A Serial Killer is a work of genius provided you can make it all the way through.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer 4K Restoration Blu-ray & Digital Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
Following its theatrical re-release this fall, the 4K restoration of John McNaughton's Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer will be unleashed on Blu-ray and digital platforms this December from Dark Sky Films, giving horror fans the chance to bring Henry home for the holidays...

Press Release: It was a true game-changer, a film so upsetting in its blunt depiction of an amoral murderer that it made the slasher films of its time look like cartoons by comparison. Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer became a lightning rod in heated debates about cinema and censorship but has only grown in stature since its first showing in 1986. Now, on the 30th anniversary of its momentous debut, it returns in a 4K restoration on digital platforms and blu-ray on December 6th, following a nationwide theatrical release.

Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer is a chilling profile of a cold-blooded killer that, 30 years after its historic festival premiere,
See full article at DailyDead »

Banned and Brutal: 14 Beyond-Controversial Horror Movies

Banned and Brutal: 14 Beyond-Controversial Horror Movies
There are horror movies that will give you nightmares, and cause you to fear showers and shallow waters for decades. There are some that get deep under your skin – often times because they've literally flayed or burrowed under their characters' skins – and others that will make you see everyday items (a bowl of pea soup, a hockey mask, a videotape) in a horrifying new light. And then there are the ones that push so many social-taboo envelopes, strike so many collective raw nerves and tweak so many communal gag reflexes that they are a cut,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

John McNaughton on Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer’s 30 Year Anniversary

Thirty years ago, John McNaughton directed Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, a provocative portrayal of a pair of sick and twisted murderers – it continues to shock and disturb viewers to this day. The movie made an impression in… Continue Reading →

The post John McNaughton on Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer’s 30 Year Anniversary appeared first on Dread Central.
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Slideshow: Red-Carpet Portraits from the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival

Previous | Image 1 of 18 | NextOPENING Night: Rosemarie DeWitt of ‘La La Land.’

Chicago – The glamor and the action always takes place on the Red Carpet, and the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival had one virtually every night of their two week 2016 run. New and veteran celebrities walked the carpet, representing their films or being honored at the fest, and HollywoodChicago.com was there.

The following are the Red Carpet questions asked and answered by the participants.

Click “Next” and “Previous” to scan through the slideshow or jump directly to individual photos with the captioned links below. All photos © Joe Arce for HollywoodChicago.com.

Opening Night: Premiere of “La La Land

Featured actor Rosemarie DeWitt and Director Damian Chazelle was in attendance on October 13th, 2016.

HollywoodChicago.com: What do you think is key to not acting self conscious in acting when you’re about to burst into song?

Rosemarie DeWitt: Well,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Joshua Reviews John McNaughton’s Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer [Theatrical Review]

To a wide collection of even studied cineastes, let alone your average moviegoer, the name John McNaughton may not ring many a bell. Splitting his career between films like Wild Things or 2013’s The Harvest and television efforts like his stint on Homicide: Life in the Streets or John From Cincinnati, McNaughton is the definition of the modern film making journeyman. However, there’s one credit to his name that’s not remembered simply for campiness or even its influence on today’s fascination with true crime narratives.

His first fiction feature, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer is not only one of the director’s most highly regarded works, but with its focus on the internal struggle of its monstrous protagonist, it’s still one of horror cinema’s most entrancing experiments. Newly restored thanks to Dark Sky Films, the film is starting a new run in theaters around the country,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Bleak & Brutal ‘Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer’ Has Aged But Still Manages To Shock [Review]

The story of “Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer” is one of cinema lore. Originally filmed in 1985, the picture was shelved after being screened to underwhelmed producers who had asked director John McNaughton for a straight up horror flick. However, McNaughton and co. got the picture into a handful of festivals where the praise rang loud enough to prompt a small release, despite the X rating ‘Henry’ was slapped with (Roger Ebert notably loved it).

Continue reading Bleak & Brutal ‘Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer’ Has Aged But Still Manages To Shock [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

“We as Filmmakers Entertain You with Violence”: John McNaughton on Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

The phrase “1980s horror” connotes a certain VHS aisle of franchised faces: Freddy, Jason, Chucky, Michael Myers, Pinhead. Far from that pack, like the anti-social loner of John McNaughton’s 1986 landmark film, we have Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. Henry looks like a guy you’d actually see on a police lineup, intimidating but anonymous. As conceived by McNaughton and co-screenwriter Richard Fire, Henry lives in a nondescript Chicago apartment, works part time as an exterminator, and, in his spare time, kills people with nauseating ease. McNaughton films the carnage with a radical matter-of-factness, stripping an ostensible horror film of […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Exclusive: Don’t Say Sorry In Clip From Newly Restored Cult Horror Classic ‘Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer’

In our recent list of the 25 Best Horror Films Of The 1980s, John McNaughton’s “Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer” made the top ten. Anyone who has already seen the movie knows the deeply chilling power of the film, but those who have yet to experience this cult favorite will get a chance starting this week with the 30th anniversary release of the picture, complete with a new 4K restoration.

Continue reading Exclusive: Don’t Say Sorry In Clip From Newly Restored Cult Horror Classic ‘Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer’ Exclusive Clip: The 30th Anniversary 4K Restoration of The Acclaimed Violent Thriller

‘Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer’ Exclusive Clip: The 30th Anniversary 4K Restoration of The Acclaimed Violent Thriller
John McNaughton’s “Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer,” about the nomadic killer Henry and his murderous exploits, based on the real-life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas, made its world premiere at the Chicago International Film Festival in 1986. It then traveled the festival circuit throughout the late 80s, including Telluride and Boston, where it garnered acclaim and controversy from critics, distributors, and the public for its graphic violence and nihilistic tone. Finally, in 1990, Greycat Films picked it up for limited release and it entered theaters unrated, as opposed to the Mppa’s X rating, which was usually saved only for pornographic films. Now for its 30th anniversary, Dark Sky Films will release a 4K restoration of the film that will open in theaters nationwide. Watch an exclusive clip from the restored film below.

Read More: ‘Tales of the Grim Sleeper’ Director Nick Broomfield on Serial Killer’s Death Sentence:
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Director John McNaughton Reflects on Filming Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer

  • DailyDead
This year marks the 30th anniversary of John McNaughton's Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, and Dark Sky Films will celebrate the seminal film's birthday with a theatrical release of the movie's 4K restoration on October 21st. Before that day arrives, though, star Michael Rooker and McNaughton will bring Henry home tonight with a screening and Q&A at the event where it premiered 30 years ago: the Chicago International Film Festival. Ahead of the special occasion, Daily Dead caught up with McNaughton to reflect on the making of his cult classic and the creation of one of cinema's most cold-blooded killers.

The performances and the way you shot Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer make it feel so real while watching it. It feels like we found a tape from a real-life killer. When you were making the movie, was that one of your biggest objectives, to make it seem as real as possible?
See full article at DailyDead »
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