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6 items from 2012


Post Sandy Thoughts: Seven Disaster Films Done Right

2 November 2012 11:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The gray rolling seas thundered through the forest of pilings under the piers, sometimes cresting enough to send a geyser of wind-whipped froth up onto the decking. Other places, it poured through the gaps the wind and tide had eaten through the dunes and poured into the beach town streets. It pulled boats large and small from their moorings in the lagoon marinas and piled them like a child’s toys up on the land. Some in apartment buildings would tell of the cars in the ground level garage floating against each other bathtub playthings. But there was nothing childlike in the way it took entire houses, made seaside villages look like an extension of the ocean and not the land.

For the day and a half I watched Hurricane Sandy pound my home state of New Jersey – which was all the time I had before I lost my cable »

- Bill Mesce

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Ten Classic Cinematic Horror Deaths

21 October 2012 5:26 PM, PDT | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Where would a horror movie be without a classic death scene – or two? We’ve had some great ones over the years: Janet Leigh’s shower to end all showers in Psycho (1960); the ill fated nude swim in Jaws (1975); David Warner’s famous decapitation in The Omen (1976); John Hurt’s serious indigestion problem in Alien (1979); and the exploding head in Scanners (1980). And let’s not forget the gruesome ends that befell pre-stardom Kevin Bacon and Johnny Depp.

Hang on a minute! I’ve just mentioned all the classic ones! Well let’s face it, so much has been written and discussed about those famous demises, they’ve been pretty much done to death (sorry!). Therefore, the following ten are horror-related deaths that deserve some kind of classic status, a couple of which are notable for their surreal and ambiguous nature.But beware...since most of the best death scenes are »

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Exclusive Interview: Harker Creator Roger Gibson

2 August 2012 1:41 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

When Roger Gibson and Vince Danks’ first graphic novel devoted to Dci Harker – subtitled The Book of Solomon – landed on my desk, it came with a promise of TV detective reference points, charismatic characters and beautiful artwork. And the book, recently released by Titan disappoints on none of those points, offering a convergence of two story-telling worlds that should have happened a lot more in the past – the detective story and the comic book.

But then there hasn’t really been anyone like Gibson writing that sort of material before now, melding the self-referential pastiche of Life On Mars with the eye for authentic characterisation (and just the right touch of idiosyncracy) that underpins all of the best TV and movie detectives. They are islands in a sea of suspects, morally fortified but occasionally happy to bend the rules to breaking point in the name of justice, and in Harker, »

- Simon Gallagher

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5 Underseen Apocalypse Movies To Accompany 'Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World'

22 June 2012 10:12 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Apocalypse is an ever-popular idea in cinema. After all, what could be more dramatic than the possibility -- or even the actuality -- of the end of everyone and everything that you've ever known. It's an all purpose metaphor, and can be used to tell all kinds of stories, in all kinds of tones, as highlighted by this weekend's comedy-drama "Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World," which sees Steve Carell and Keira Knightley brought together by the impending end of civilization.

The film's only semi-successful at melding romantic comedy with the end of days, as you'll find from our review, but there's plenty in the film to recommend it as well. And if you're still looking for a little more end-of-the-world drama, we've picked out five lesser-known examples that are worth seeking out Asap. Check out our selections below, and let us know your own favorites in the comments section. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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DVD Playhouse--June 2012

5 June 2012 11:09 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Allen Gardner

Harold And Maude (Criterion) Hal Ashby’s masterpiece of black humor centers on a wealthy young man (Bud Cort) who’s obsessed with death and the septuagenarian (Ruth Gordon) with whom he finds true love. As unabashedly romantic as it is quirky, with Cat Stevens supplying one of the great film scores of all-time. Fine support from Vivian Pickles, Cyril Cusack, Charles Tyner, and Ellen Geer. Fine screenplay by Colin Higgins. Also available on Blu-ray disc. Bonuses: Commentary by Hal Ashby biographer Nick Dawson, producer Charles Mulvehill; Illustrated audio excerpts from seminars by Ashby and Higgins; Interview with Cat Stevens. Widescreen. Dolby 2.0 stereo.

In Darkness (Sony) Agnieszka Holland’s Ww II epic tells the true story of a sewer worker and petty thief in Nazi-occupied Poland who single-handedly helped hide a group of Jews in the city’s labyrinthine sewer system for the duration of the war. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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10 (Kind Of) Great Classic Sci-Fi Flicks You May Have Never Heard Of

16 March 2012 11:27 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

We know the greats; movies like Metropolis (1927), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Star Wars (1977).

And there are those films which maybe didn’t achieve cinematic greatness, but through their inexhaustible watchability became genre touchstones, lesser classics but classics nonetheless, like The War of the Worlds (1953), Godzilla (1954), Them! (1954), The Time Machine (1960).

In the realm of science fiction cinema, those are the cream (and below that, maybe the half and half). But sci fi is one of those genres which has often too readily leant itself to – not to torture an analogy — producing nonfat dairy substitute.

During the first, great wave of sci fi movies in the 1950s, the target audience was kids and teens. There wasn’t a lot in the way of “serious” sci fi. Most of it was churned out quick and cheap; drive-in fodder, grist for the Saturday matinee mill.

By the early 1960s, »

- Bill Mesce

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6 items from 2012


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