Bruce McGill Poster


Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (2) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (2) | Trivia (14) | Personal Quotes (3)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 11 July 1950San Antonio, Texas, USA
Birth NameBruce Travis McGill
Height 5' 9¼" (1.76 m)

Mini Bio (2)

Bruce McGill grew up in San Antonio, Texas where he began his acting career in in the MacArthur High School department of theatre. His most popular role was in Animal House (1978).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Cris Edwards

Bruce McGill grew up in San Antonio, Texas. His mother, Adriel Rose (née Jacobs) is an artist, and his father, Woodrow Wilson McGill, is a real estate and insurance agent. He graduated from Douglas MacArthur High School San Antonio and from The University of Texas at Austin with a degree in drama. His love for acting stems back to elementary school. He is related to former Texas State Senator A.R. Schwartz.

McGill has starred in many films. His role as "D-Day" in National Lampoon's Animal House, taken out of desperation as a young unemployed actor, ended up being his most well known. His long acting career also includes films, Wildcats, The Last Boy Scout, My Cousin Vinny, Cliffhanger, Timecop, The Legend of Bagger Vance, The Sum of All Fears, along with many others.

McGill starred in many television roles, including portraying the Boston Police Homicide Detective Vince Korsak on the TNT television crime drama, Rizzoli & Isles. The character of Korsak is the mentor and friend of Detective Jane Rizzoli, portrayed by Angie Harmon.

Director Michael Mann,considers McGill a favorite, having worked with him on The Insider, Ali and Collateral. He has also appeared in four HBO TV films, CIA Director George Tenet in Oliver Stone's film W and, also, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton in Steven Spielberg's Lincoln.

McGill has been married to his wife Gloria since 1994.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: April M Battersby

Spouse (1)

Gloria Lee (1994 - present)

Trade Mark (2)

Frequently cast in 'Michael Mann' films.
Often plays real life figures such as politicians and other figures of authority.

Trivia (14)

Related to former Texas senator A. R. Babe Schwartz.
Among his many theatrical affiliations are the Ensemble Studio Theatre in New York and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and National Shakespeare Company in Washington, D.C.
Earned a B.F.A. in acting from The University of Texas at Austin, and later made his professional debut as a member of Rhode Island's Trinity Square Repertory Company, appearing in numerous theatrical productions.
Enjoys sailing.
His favorite roles to date have been Animal House (1978) and The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000).
His love of acting began on stage at Wilshire Elementary School in San Antonio, Texas.
Has appeared in three different productions in which he played the supervisor (of one kind or another) of a time travel project: Quantum Leap (1989), Timecop (1994) and Star Trek: Voyager (1995).
Was in the first episode (as Weird Ernie) and last episode (as Al the Bartender) of the series "Quantum Leap". They were the only two episodes he guested on.
Served as the honorary grand marshal in San Antonio on April 25, 2009.
Was mistakenly cast for the Babylon 5 installment, Severed Dreams. The executive producer had actually wanted Everett McGill. Bruce McGill performed well, however, and the show remains a fan favorite.
Accomplished pianist.
Remains in close contact with his MacGyver (1985) co-star Richard Dean Anderson.
He was inducted into the Texas Film Hall of Fame on March 11, 2010 at their 10th anniversary awards ceremony.
Played U.S. President Calvin Coolidge in For Greater Glory: The True Story of Cristiada (2012). He has also played members of three Presidential Cabinets: Edwin Stanton in Lincoln (2012), George Tenet in W. (2008), and George Ball in 'Path to War (2002)(TV)'.

Personal Quotes (3)

(2012, on Matchstick Men) I think it's one of a handful of the best movies I've done. I think it's one of Nic Cage's top performances. Sam Rockwell and myself and Nic just loved that movie. It's a really good grown-up comedy. I just think the world of that. And to play the two realities at all times was very liberating.
(2012, on handling rejection) One of the defense mechanisms I have for the difficulties in the business, one of which is rejection, is that if I do the work, I go in, and I'm prepared and I audition and they don't hire me, I'm always just amazed, thinking, "Wow! For that money, they could've had Bruce McGill, and they didn't take me? I just think that's amazing. Well, too bad for them." Rather than go, "Oh, what did I do wrong?" I just don't do that. I don't go down that road. So it's a built-in defense mechanism, but also, I feel that way. I feel like with what I know and what I can deliver, if I look enough like the guy they want to even have me in, and they don't use me, then that's their shortcoming. It's a reflection on their inability to see what's right in front of them rather than my inability to get the role.
(2012, on The Hand and working with Oliver Stone) I was looking for any A-features, and Michael Caine really made it an A-feature. So I thought, "Well, sure, that'd be great!" And it was a great experience. I really loved working with Michael Caine. He's a really skilled and experienced actor. I learn something from everybody, but when you work with somebody like that, you actually learn things you can put in your toolbox, things about craft. Not necessarily life lessons, but actual things he knows that you can pick up. To watch Oliver (Stone) direct his first film-I wouldn't change anything. I was really glad to be there, and then I was glad to see him again when we did W. He's a really smart guy, he's a really good writer, and...He has a certain kind of personality. But I really enjoy him. He's not everybody's cup of tea, but I like him a lot.

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