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Ireland’s Marcie Films Boards Mexican Docu ‘Israela & Talleen’ by Trisha Ziff (Exclusive)

Los Cabos, Mexico – In a rare move, Ireland’s Marcie Films has boarded Trisha Ziff’s upcoming documentary “Israela & Talleen” which is slated to start shooting in Israel in December. Doc is produced in Mexico by Ziff’s 212Berlin Films and Brossacuadrado. Ziff directs and produces the docu with Marcie FilmsAlan Maher who has produced a slew of docus and features including Ireland’s current submission for the Foreign Language Oscar race, folk singer biopic, “Song of Granite.”

Ziff, an English-born Mexican resident, lived in Ireland in the past and wrote a book about Irish-Mexican relations. “It’s great to be co-producing with Ireland, we expect this to be the first of two co-productions,” said Ziff.

“Israela & Talleen” centers on the unusual friendship of two trans women from disparate backgrounds and ages. Israela Stephanie Lev is a 55-year old Israeli activist in the Tel Aviv Lgbt community while Talleen Abu Hanna, 22, is an Arab
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Black Mirror’ Dp Seamus McGarvey Talks About Finding the ‘Photographic Heart’ of ‘Nosedive’

‘Black Mirror’ Dp Seamus McGarvey Talks About Finding the ‘Photographic Heart’ of ‘Nosedive’
Cinematographer Seamus McGarvey worked with director Joe Wright on a number of feature film projects through the years. So when his “old pal” signed on for the “Nosedive” episode of Charlie Brooker’s “Black Mirror” and asked McGarvey to join him, there really was no question he would say yes. “The main reason I was excited to work on this episode was that it was Joe directing,” McGarvey says. “But I’d always admired Charlie as a writer [too], first as a journalist and then as a writer of the series. ‘Black Mirror’ really gripped my imagination in a way that I haven’t felt in television since ‘The Twilight Zone.’”

As the first episode of the third season of “Black Mirror,” “Nosedive” sets the tone for the batch of episodes. Did that offer extra incentive to sign on or present additional challenges?

I didn’t know it would be [the first]. I don’t think that even Netflix knew
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Before Christopher Nolan, ‘Atonement’ Captured Dunkirk in One Powerful Long Take — Watch

Before Christopher Nolan, ‘Atonement’ Captured Dunkirk in One Powerful Long Take — Watch
Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” is finally making its way into theaters this weekend, and with it comes one of the few big screen depictions of this pivotal moment in both British and World War II history. Only Leslie Norman’s 1958 war film of the same name has also chronicled the events of Operation Dynamo, in which the British Air Force and Navy embarked on a rescue mission to save thousands of Allied soldiers stranded on Dunkirk beach. But anyone who has seen Joe Wright’s “Atonement” has been to Dunkirk before, courtesy of a jaw-dopping long take that ranks among cinema’s finest.

Read More: ‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made

The showcase scene in Wright’s adaptation of Ian McEwan’s novel is a five-minute tracking shot that follows James McAvoy’s wounded British soldier Robbie Turner as he
See full article at Indiewire »

Indie Film Invades the Emmys: Jean Marc-Vallée, Reed Morano and More Cinematic Voices Dominate

Indie Film Invades the Emmys: Jean Marc-Vallée, Reed Morano and More Cinematic Voices Dominate
They say television is the new film, and that’s certainly true when you look at how many actors, directors, writers, cinematographers and more from the film world are counted among this year’s Emmy nominees. A majority of the biggest contenders, from “The Handmaid’s Tale” to “The Night Of,” “Big Little Lies” and “The Crown,” brought some of the best film talent to the small screen over the last year, and their work resulted in major recognition from the TV Academy.

Read More: 2017 Emmy Nominations List: ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Westworld’ Nominated for Best Drama Series

All of these nominations for film stars and behind-the-scenes talent shouldn’t come as a surprise in the era of Peak TV, but they confirm that the small screen is offering certain opportunities that Hollywood just isn’t these days. Between stronger female roles and a directorial freedom studios don’t allow, TV is
See full article at Indiewire »

Joe Wright Relished the Chance to Go Polyester in ‘Black Mirror’

Joe Wright Relished the Chance to Go Polyester in ‘Black Mirror’
Anatomy of a Scene: “Black Mirror,” Season 3, Ep. 1 “Nosedive” (Netflix)

In his episode of the sci-fi anthology series “Black Mirror,” Joe Wright re-creates a near-future where people incessantly rate each other. A desperate social climber, played by Bryce Dallas Howard, survives a series of mishaps to speak at a childhood friend’s wedding reception, in the dim hope she’ll get a ratings boost. “The scene is a combination of everything we’ve seen leading up to that point,” says Wright. “It’s the moment where our protagonist falls apart and the collision between the way she wants the world to be and who she really is destroys all illusions.”

James Foster

Production designer

“The idea was to create a kind of picture-perfect wedding — the kind of dappled sunlight of a perfect magazine-celebrity wedding. We were replicating Southern California in South Africa, where we shot the episode. The choice of location was extremely important, and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Netflix Original Films: Coming Soon to a Theater Near You?

The future of the streaming giant might not be streaming.

When streaming companies like Netlfix and Amazon got into the business of making original feature films, the industry was poised for a major change. Because these weren’t B-movies the companies were making, they weren’t the kind of low-brow fodder that gets released directly for home viewing every week, they were full-on, talent-backed, major motion pictures. Netflix had an amazing critical run (and some would say an Oscar snub or two) with Cary Fukunaga’s Beasts of No Nation, and Amazon last year produced a slew of significant films from significant directors, including Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq, Nicolas Winding Refn’s The Neon Demon, and most notably, Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester by the Sea, which did manage to snag a handful of Oscar noms and even walked away with a pair of wins, one for Lonergan for Best Original Screenplay, and
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

When "Life" Goes Wrong...

by Nathaniel R

Stop me if you've heard this one before: a group of scientists are tasked with bringing samples of life back from outer space. Soon they are trapped in a nightmarish monster movie, as the alien life force picks them off one by one.

Life, the latest monster movie set in space, does a lot of things right despite its familiarity. Let's give credit where it's due. It hired capable involving actors in all the underwritten roles including Jake Gyllenhaal who we'll follow anywhere, even into deep space for a Alien ripoff. It's very handsomely lensed by prestigious cinematographer Seamus McGarvey. The direction by Daniel Espinosa (Child 44, Safe House) makes repeated smart use of the zero gravity setting, with well staged setpieces and even some unexpectedly beautiful compositions; the earliest casualty among the crew prompts the movie's eeriest morbidly pretty image. Apart from one confusing action sequence near the climax,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Life review – exuberantly grisly Alien rip-off

Rebecca Ferguson, Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds play an enjoyably gory game of hide-and-seek with a hungry alien

The crew of a space station is picked off, one by one, by an extraterrestrial life form which seems to view the human contents of the craft as some kind of alien finger buffet. And if that premise sounds more than a little familiar, that’s because Daniel Espinosa’s enjoyable sci-fi horror movie shares narrative DNA with everything from Tarkovsky’s Solaris to Danny Boyle’s Sunshine to, most glaringly of all, Ridley Scott’s Alien. But although this is undeniably an Alien rip-off, it’s an Alien rip-off that announces itself with a dizzyingly audacious zero-gravity single-shot sequence in which Ryan Reynolds wrests a wounded satellite out of orbit using a rob otic grabber claw. With this stunning set piece, cinematographer Seamus McGarvey more than meets the challenge set by
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: Life Features a Killer Creature, But Lacks Personality

You know the old saying “curiosity killed the cat?” Well, Daniel Espinosa’s Life proves that curiosity can certainly kill the astronaut, too, as a crew aboard a space station discover the hard way that some questions shouldn’t be answered… or probed with an electric wand.

A small team of astronauts, one alien, and one isolated setting where no one can hear them scream. Yes, the setup for Life, penned by Zombieland and Deadpool co-writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick, may sound familiar, and although it never strays far from the story beats many sci-fi horror fans will be expecting, it does execute them (and its characters) with efficient, even ruthless, precision.

Despite its title, death is omnipresent throughout Life, and when characters do die, the emotional toll it takes on the surviving characters is painfully palpable. From its first brutal, unexpected kill scene, you know that Life treats
See full article at DailyDead »

Life Review

Space. “The final frontier.” Sprawling nothingness explored to death by superheroes, adventurers and aliens alike. The whole “spaceship disaster scenario” seems familiar by now, doesn’t it? Characters are confined inside cold, industrial coffins that repeat symbolically through modern science fiction. Gravity might take us outside, but the backdrops rarely differ. Infinite black vastness dotted with twinkling stars – like an unending echo chamber. It’s with this mentality that Life plays by Ridley Scott’s alien survival textbooks, as a thousand post-Alien thrillers have similarly attempted. In space, no one can hear you scream – but can they hear you “meh?”

Director Daniel Espinosa takes us aboard the International Space Station, where astronauts await research findings from Mars. The tiny cargo shuttle almost flies away due to its wonky trajectory, but Roy Adams (Ryan Reynolds) reels in the hurdling package. Researcher Hugh Derry (Ariyon Bakare) studies their collected specimens, to
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Review: ‘Life’ is an Unsparing, Familiar Survival Thriller

If Hollywood’s revitalized interest in space — embodied by Gravity, The Martian, and Interstellar — has proven anything, it’s that the galaxy is terrifying enough without the presence of extraterrestrial life. As the horrors of eternal darkness, flying debris, spacesuit malfunctions, and grappling with the psychological effects of loneliness weigh on our protagonists, Life attempts to up the ante by adding to the equation a creature hell-bent on destroying every human in its path. Although wholly derivative of the sci-fi touchstones that came before it, Daniel Espinosa’s streamlined, down-and-dirty approach makes for a refreshingly self-contained survival thriller.

Beginning with an extended, zero-gravity-replicating single take that hovers through the International Space Station, we’re introduced to the crew (made up of Jake Gyllenhaal, Rebecca Ferguson, Ryan Reynolds, Hiroyuki Sanada, Ariyon Bakare, and Olga Dihovichnaya), who have found the first proof of life beyond Earth. A space probe heading back from
See full article at The Film Stage »

“Life” is an A-list filled B-movie science fiction tale

There will always be films that exist as a way of paying tribute to a classic that’s come before it. In the next few days, a new one is hitting screens. On Friday, Life opens and it hopes to be a new version to an old hit. The cast here though is impeccable, led by the A-list team of Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds. They’re two of the biggest and brightest stars in Hollywood. Working off of a script by the suddenly hot screenwriting duo of Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick, who are fresh off of a Writers Guild of America nomination for Deadpool. This is what Reese and Wernick have been up to since, with Reynolds along for the ride as well. The movie is a science fiction horror outing in the tradition of Alien. Here, we follow a team of a half dozen scientists working aboard the International Space Station.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Rebecca Ferguson interview: Life, acting in zero-g, sci-fi

Ryan Lambie Mar 22, 2017

Mission: Impossible and Life star Rebecca Ferguson talks to us about her favourite sci-fi film and lots more...

"It's a good word, isn't it? Chaise Longues." Rebecca Ferguson's on top form when we meet her in a London hotel one March morning - upbeat, funny, and far from the terrified quarantine officer she plays in her latest film, the sci-fi thriller, Life.

See related  The Last Kingdom series 2 episode 1 review The Last Kingdom series 2: politics, battles and arselings What can we expect from new BBC drama, The Last Kingdom?

Having stolen every scene in which she appeared from under Tom Cruise's nose as MI6 agent Ilsa Faust in Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation, Life sees her in another bruising role. Life may be more about suspense than full-on action - it sees an alien life form grow in a petri dish on the International
See full article at Den of Geek »

SXSW Film Review: ‘Life’

SXSW Film Review: ‘Life’
Why is it that practically every time sci-fi characters discover evidence of extraterrestrial life, they are just as swiftly confronted with creative new ways to die? As “we are not alone” scenarios go, “Life” is no exception, although it’s unusually intelligent for so much of its running time — picture white-knuckle “Alien” hijinks grounded by “Gravity”-strong human drama — that the lame-brained last act comes as a real disappointment (unless you’re determined to read this Sony-released Mars-attacks thriller as an origin story for Spider-Man’s Venom nemesis, which it is not).

Still, overlook its inevitable wah-wah ending (cue sad trombone sound effect), and “Life” is far better than the trailers made this me-too outer-space opus look. Assuming that “Passengers” hasn’t quashed audiences’ appetite for space-station movies, and that sci-fi enthusiasts wouldn’t rather simply wait for Ridley Scott’s fast-approaching “Alien: Covenant,” then director Daniel Espinosa’s mostly-smart,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

  • Cinelinx
Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

  • Cinelinx
Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

  • Cinelinx
Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

  • Cinelinx
Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

  • Cinelinx
Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

  • Cinelinx
Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change.
See full article at Cinelinx »
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