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A Look Back: The American New Wave 1958-1967

In 1983, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, along with Media Study/Buffalo, created a touring retrospective of avant-garde films, primarily feature-length ones and a few shorts, which they called “The American New Wave 1958-1967.” To accompany the tour, a hefty catalog was produced that included notes on the films, essays by film historians and critics, writings by major underground film figures and more.

The retrospective was created at a time when financially viable independent filmmaking was on the rise, such as films made by John Sayles, Wayne Wang and Susan Seidelman. According to the co-curators of the retrospective, Melinda Ward and Bruce Jenkins, the objective of the tour was to:

provide a more adequate picture than conventional history affords us of a rare period of American cinematic invention and thereby prepare a coherent critical and historical context for the reception of the new work by the current generation of independent filmmakers.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Why a Hollywood Billboard Features 43,412 Nude Scenes

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There may be more squinting these days on the streets of Hollywood. To mark its 18th birthday, MrSkin.com, the web's top repository of mainstream screen nudity, erected a billboard July 30 at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and La Brea Avenue featuring screenshots from all 43,412 female nude scenes on its servers.

"We launched on Aug. 10, 1999 — we're joking that we're finally legal," says Mr. Skin himself, CEO Jim McBride, a 54-year-old father of three from Chicago. The site, which sees 9 million uniques per month and costs $72 a year for full access, hit the big...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Why a Hollywood Billboard Features 43,412 Nude Scenes

<!--[Cdata[

There may be more squinting these days on the streets of Hollywood. To mark its 18th birthday, MrSkin.com, the web's top repository of mainstream screen nudity, erected a billboard July 30 at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and La Brea Avenue featuring screenshots from all 43,412 female nude scenes on its servers.

"We launched on Aug. 10, 1999 — we're joking that we're finally legal," says Mr. Skin himself, CEO Jim McBride, a 54-year-old father of three from Chicago. The site, which sees 9 million uniques per month and costs $72 a year for full access, hit the big...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Cheryl Dunye on Making History with ‘The Watermelon Woman,’ Representation, and Performance

Twenty years ago, Cheryl Dunye made history as the first African-American lesbian to direct a feature-length film. Now that film, The Watermelon Woman, has finally been given a proper DVD release, courtesy of First Run Features. To mark the occasion, we spoke on the phone with Dunye about the film, history, performance, and authenticity.

The Film Stage: Both The Watermelon Woman and the short that’s included on the new DVD, Black Is Blue, express a high level of commitment and detail in the recreation of documentary form. What documentaries and / or mockumentaries influenced you?

Cheryl Dunye: I’ve been working in this practice since the late ‘80s. I went to Rutgers and had a studio practice there, got my Mfa, and that’s where I discovered what was becoming the queer film world. There was a lack of identity, representation — in the work that was being seen — by,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Breathless

Quentin Tarantino loved Jim McBride’s remake of Godard’s seminal new wave film, even though it recalls the glossy facades of star Richard Gere’s American Gigolo more than the gritty black and white of that French director’s kinetic masterpiece. The plot is more Tarantianian than Godard as well, with Gere as a casual thief obsessed with comic books and rock ’n roll. Valerie Kaprisky is his scrumptious partner in crime and Richard Kline (The Fury) provided the sumptuous photography.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

NYC Weekend Watch: Double Bills, ‘Inherent Vice’ on 70mm, Kurosawa, Minnelli & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

Cinema’s holy trinity — Ed Wood (technically Burton-Wood), Malick, and Chaplin — have two-for-one double-billings this weekend.

Howards End continues its run.

Museum of the Moving Image

“See It Big! The 70mm Show” concludes with Kenneth Branagh‘s Hamlet and Inherent Vice.

If you missed it in theaters, see the great Kaili Blues when
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: Alain Resnais, Theo Angelopoulos, ‘Last Tango In Paris’ & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

“Welcome to Metrograph: A to Z” has a packed weekend with a slate that includes Alain Resnais‘ Je t’aime, je t’aime, Nicholas Ray‘s The Lusty Men, Jackie Brown, and, yes, Jackass 3D.

Baumbach & Paltrow‘s De Palma plays with a Jim McBride feature on Saturday and two De Palma shorts on Sunday.
See full article at The Film Stage »

10 Movie Remakes Involving Auteur Directors

Today the estimable Shout Factory releases the 1983 Jim McBride film "Breathless" on Blu Ray. It stars Richard Gere and Valerie Kaprisky in a loose-limbed lovers-on-the-run story, features a pretty groovy soundtrack comprising Jerry Lee Lewis, Mink De Ville and Sam Cooke songs along with a rather insistently overused Philip Glass track, and you can even catch a glimpse of Richard Gere's peen if that's your thing. But none of that is the reason that "Breathless" is the curio that it is —it's because the film has the sheer gall to be a Hollywood remake of the groundbreaking 1960 Nouvelle Vague film by Jean-Luc Godard that we talk about it at all. Of course, remakes are mounted all the time. But a relatively unknown director (as McBride was) taking on the work of a monolithically accepted "auteur" is a little more unusual. And sometimes the reverse occurs, when a widely acclaimed
See full article at The Playlist »

Breathless Screens at The Tivoli This Tuesday Night

Breathless is not playing at this year’s Classic French Film Festival, but St. Louis classic French film fans get to see it on the big screen anyway! It’s part of the Mildred Lane Kemper Museum’s series A Critical Eye: Avant-Garde Cinema of the 1960s and is screening this Tuesday night (March 24th) at the Tivoli (6350 Delmar Blvd. University City, Mo). The show starts at 7pm. Admission is Free!

Breathless was remade in 1983 with Richard Gere and Valerie Kaprisky (remember her? Me neither). The remake, directed by Jim McBride, is excellent but has been hard to see in recent years. It will be available on Blu-ray on April 7th, which means this is a perfect time to take in the original to compare and contrast.

The part that Jean Luc-Godard played in The French New Wave was tremendous. Breathless (1960), with its innovative jump-cuts, catapulted Godard into international fame.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

L.M. Kit Carson Is Dead: ‘Paris, Texas’ Writer, USA Film Fest Co-Founder

  • Deadline
L.M. Kit Carson Is Dead: ‘Paris, Texas’ Writer, USA Film Fest Co-Founder
An iconoclast in the worlds of independent film and journalism who embodied — and celibrated — Texas individualism, Carson died October 20 in Dallas following a long battle with osteoporosis and other illnesses. He was 73.

A Dallas native whose career took him to Austin, Houston, New York, Los Angeles and many places far afield and in between, Lewis Minor Carson was best known as co-author with Sam Shepard of the Wim Wenders film Paris, Texas (Carson’s official credit was for “adaptation”), which won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1984. Known universally as Kit, after his Texas Ranger grandfather, he is credited with helping create the”mockumentary” genre for writing and playing the title role in David Holtzman’s Diary, the Jim McBride film about a navel-gazer who decides to film every moment of his unmomentous life. The 1967 film anticipated such disparate touchstones as the film This Is Spinal Tap and the
See full article at Deadline »

'Paris, Texas' co-writer L.M. Kit Carson dies at 73

'Paris, Texas' co-writer L.M. Kit Carson dies at 73
L.M. Kit Carson, the eclectic, fiercely independent Texas filmmaker best known for starring in the ahead-of-its-time cinéma vérité satire David Holzman's Diary, shaping the narrative arc of Paris, Texas, and helping launch the career of Wes Anderson, died Monday after a lengthy illness, his son Hunter announced on Facebook. He was 73. Born in Irving, Texas in 1941, Carson had a scattered youth: He spent six months in a Jesuit monastery and flitted in and out of various colleges before settling in New York to pursue a freelance work in magazine writing. In 1967 he teamed up with Jim McBride to star in the experimental,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Rip Writer L.M. 'Kit' Carson, Dead at 73

I knew him well over the years, hanging with him in L.A. or at various film festivals from Sundance to Vail. Carson was an energetic, enthusiastic, generous, eager, curious man always in pursuit of the new. He embraced life, people, movies, and new technology--he was shooting films on smart phones before anyone else I knew. In these last few years he was enjoying accepting tribute kudos at various fests around the world, and was globe-trotting with his wife and producing partner Cynthia Hargrave to shoot Nokia flicks for his multi-platform 12-episode digital documentary series "Africa Diary" for The Sundance Channel. Carson made his name starring as a narcissistic filmmaker in the classic 1968 mockumentary "David Holzman’s Diary," which he co-wrote with his long-time collaborator, director Jim McBride ("Breathless"), which producer Ted Hope recently wrote about here. A recent Q & A with Carson is here. In recent...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Daily | L.M. Kit Carson, 1941 – 2014

Actor, producer, screenwriter and director L.M. Kit Carson has passed away at the age of 73. Carson co-wrote and starred in David Holzman's Diary (1967), a landmark critique of cinema vérité. He'd team up with director Jim McBride again on a remake of Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless in 1983 that starred Richard Gere and Valérie Kaprisky. He also helped complete the screenplay for Wim Wenders’s Paris, Texas (1984), which starred his son, Hunter Carson, whose mother is the late Karen Black. Carson's 1971 documentary The American Dreamer chronicled the making of Dennis Hopper's The Last Movie. And Carson was instrumental in the making of Wes Anderson's Bottle Rocket (1996). » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

‘Pulp Fiction,’ ‘Roger & Me,’ ‘Mary Poppins’ Join National Film Registry

‘Pulp Fiction,’ ‘Roger & Me,’ ‘Mary Poppins’ Join National Film Registry
Pulp Fiction,” “Roger & Me,” “The Magnificent Seven,” “Mary Poppins,” “Judgment at Nuremberg” and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” are among 25 films selected by the Library of Congress this year to be added to its National Film Registry.

The registry is composed of U.S.-made pics dating from 1912 that are deemed “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” enough to warrant preservation. The list is expanded annually by 25 titles selected by the librarian from suggestions by the facility’s curators, members of the National Film Preservation Board and the public. The 2013 selections bring the number of pics in the Registry to 625.

Eligible films run the gamut of Hollywood classics, silent films, documentaries, independent and experimental motion pictures. This year’s picks are the usual eclectic mix that include MGM’s 1956 sci-fi classic, “Forbidden Planet;” John Wayne’s much-praised turn in John Ford’s 1952 drama “The Quiet Man;” the Charles Vidor- directed film noir classic,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Computer Chess: Hollywood needs a new gambit when it comes to chess

Film-makers have tried sex, murder and intrigue, and yet that most intellectual of spectator sports remains remarkably difficult to depict on screen

Peter Bradshaw's review of Computer Chess

Computer Chess: watch the trailer

Throw a rock at the sports genre and you'll hit a film about baseball or football, or hockey, or racing. Odds are, you won't strike a film about chess. Chess isn't generally considered a stadium filler (although it can be). It's perceived as a game for eccentric intellectuals and elderly historians. It doesn't have the glamour or sex appeal of more sedentary sports, such as pool, as demonstrated by Paul Newman in The Hustler. Chess won't even fit snugly in to other genre films, where the banality of cards, for example, naturally lends itself to a seedy, gambling gangster underworld (Rounders), the exotic highlife of a casino (Casino Royale), or even more piquant, a combo
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ranking David Lynch’s Films

How many filmmakers can you think of that have their own verb? “Lynchian” is a part of even the most casual cinephile, though it’s often used erroneously. All too often, anything a little out of the ordinary, with a vague sense of the uncanny, earns the term. Looking back at the man’s filmography, however, it’s clear that there’s much more to Lynch’s work than mere eccentricity, especially given that he’s made films that don’t easily fit into common ideas about what it is for a film or a work of art to even be “Lynchian.” Beyond that, Lynch himself is such a singular presence beyond his films – as a thinker, a writer, and even as a musician – that attempts to Xerox his work are doubly pointless. As it’s David Lynch month here at the site, we decided to poll our writers on their favorite Lynch movies,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Forgotten: Body Snatchers

  • MUBI
I always felt an icky attraction-repulsion, more slanted towards repulsion, for Liliana Cavani's most celebrated film, The Night Porter. But thinking about it now, I have to give her credit for boldly delving into the psychology of the persecutor-victim relationship in a way that no previous filmmaker quite had.

If that movie still makes me uncomfortable, I was nevertheless instantly psyched to see I cannibali (The Cannibals, 1970), a sci-fi hippy version of Antigone starring Britt Ekland. Maybe I'm shallow.

(Hippy science fiction movies go all the way from the super-respectable and respect-worthy 2001 at one extreme, past Silent Running somewhere in the middle, all the way to Jim McBride's 1971 post-atomic Adam and Eve story Glen and Randa. It's a sub-genre that can get a bit embarrassing, what with Bruce Dern lecturing us about "the simple beauty of a leaf" and all, but having been entered the world in 1967 maybe
See full article at MUBI »

Notebook's 5th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2012

  • MUBI
Looking back at 2012 on what films moved and impressed us, it is clear that watching old films is a crucial part of making new films meaningful. Thus, the annual tradition of our end of year poll, which calls upon our writers to pick both a new and an old film: they were challenged to choose a new film they saw in 2012—in theaters or at a festival—and creatively pair it with an old film they also saw in 2012 to create a unique double feature.

All the contributors were asked to write a paragraph explaining their 2012 fantasy double feature. What's more, each writer was given the option to list more pairings, with or without explanation, as further imaginative film programming we'd be lucky to catch in that perfect world we know doesn't exist but can keep dreaming of every time we go to the movies.

How would you program some
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Happenings: The Apocalypse Comes To Bam (In 35mm!)

During these past days in the hallowed palaces of culture on the Upper West Side the 50th New York Film Festival has barreled forward with many a sold-out screening, transmedia panel and glitzy gala gathering. Meanwhile in Brooklyn... workers and shoppers stream in and out of the Atlantic Terminal, oblivious to their neighbors at the Brooklyn Academy of Music who have seen the signs, heard the warnings and are taking precautions for the coming Apocalypse... ...And what better way to prepare then throw an Apocalypse themed film series? Running from October 4th - 7th, Apocalypse Soon hopes to save your life with 5 how-to-survive scenarios played out on film. "Post Apocalypse Road Tripping 101" is the first lesson, and your instructors are Jim McBride's own...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Great Balls of Fire! Jerry Lee Lewis biopic strikes wrong note on scandal

Cheery film has great music but treatment of rock'n'roll singer's union with his young cousin makes for queasy viewing

Director: Jim McBride

Entertainment grade: D–

History grade: C+

Jerry Lee Lewis broke through as a rock'n'roll musician in the late 1950s. His career foundered after he bigamously married Myra Gale Brown, his first cousin once removed, when she was just 13 years old.

Romance

In 1956, the 21-year-old Lewis moves in with his cousin Jw Brown in Memphis, Tennessee. Immediately, he clocks Brown's 12-year-old daughter, Myra Gale. It's not great for a 21-year-old to be macking on a 12-year-old, but the fact that the film casts Dennis Quaid, then 35 but looking raddled thanks to a bad peroxide job, opposite Winona Ryder, then 18 but looking much younger, makes it seem even worse. Quaid's performance is fine – the real Jerry Lee Lewis and the real Myra Gale Brown both found it convincing – but he
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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