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‘Logan’ Director James Mangold Sings Praises of His Production Team

‘Logan’ Director James Mangold Sings Praises of His Production Team
In Fox blockbuster “Logan,” the title character says, “I’m not whatever you think I am.” The same is true of the movie, an “X-Men” sequel that’s more classic Hollywood film noir/Western than superhero movie. Director and co-writer James Mangold talks about the contributions of his team of artisans in giving the film a different vibe from that of its predecessors.

Cinematographer John Mathieson

The idea was to produce a more natural film, on location, which avoided the fetishizing of superhero gear and vehicles that had become a trope of these movies. There’s a general look of what’s been successful in the last decade with superhero movies, and I definitely didn’t want that. I brought up Westerns like “Shane” and “Unforgiven,” but also “The Wrestler” or Clint Eastwood’s “The Gauntlet,” which felt very naturalistic, where lighting was natural or practical, not glammed up. The whole take of the script was that
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Margot Robbie Looks Unrecognizable as Queen Elizabeth I on the Set of Mary, Queen of Scots

Margot Robbie Looks Unrecognizable as Queen Elizabeth I on the Set of Mary, Queen of Scots
Great Scott! With flame red hair and a blotchy complexion, Margot Robbie got into character as Queen Elizabeth I for Focus Features' Mary, Queen of Scots in Goldthorpe, England, over the weekend. Robbie, who was photographed in and out of costume on the set of the movie, also appeared to be wearing a prosthetic nose to resemble the Virgin Queen, who ruled from 1558 to 1603; John Mathieson officially photographed Robbie's co-star, Saoirse Ronan, in costume last week. Production on the Working Title Films production, directed by Josie Rourke, began late last week in the U.K. Starring Ronan in the titular role, Joe Alwyn, Martin Compston, Brendan Coyle, Jack Lowden, Guy Pearce and David Tennant round out the...
See full article at E! Online »

Here’s Your First Look At Saoirse Ronan In ‘Mary, Queen Of Scots’

Filming has officially started on location in England and Scotland on the Working Title Films production of Mary, Queen of Scots, starring Saoirse Ronan in the title role opposite Margot Robbie as Elizabeth I. Josie Rourke, artistic director of The Donmar Warehouse, makes her feature directorial debut on the movie. See Saoirse Ronan as Mary Queen Of Scots below.

Saoirse Ronan as Mary Queen Of Scots – The film is now in-production

Beau Willimon, an Academy Award nominee for The Ides of March and Emmy Award nominee for House of Cards, has written the screenplay adaptation. Mary, Queen of Scots is based on John Guy’s acclaimed biography ‘My Heart is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots.’

Joining the cast are Jack Lowden (Dunkirk, England is Mine), Joe Alwyn (The Sense of an Ending, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk), Martin Compston (Sweet Sixteen, Line of Duty) and Brendan Coyle (Downton Abbey,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

First Look at Saoirse Ronan in Mary, Queen of Scots

  • MovieWeb
First Look at Saoirse Ronan in Mary, Queen of Scots
Filming has begun on location in England and Scotland on the Working Title Films production of Mary Queen of Scots, starring Saoirse Ronan in the title role opposite Margot Robbie as Elizabeth I. Josie Rourke, artistic director of The Donmar Warehouse, makes her feature directorial debut on the movie. Focus Features holds worldwide rights and will release Mary, Queen of Scots in the Us and Universal Pictures International (Upi) will distribute the film internationally.

The producers of Mary, Queen of Scots are Working Title co-chairs Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, and Debra Hayward, all Academy Award nominees as producers of Best Picture Oscar nominee Les Mis&#233rables.

Beau Willimon, an Academy Award nominee for The Ides of March and Emmy Award nominee for House of Cards, has written the screenplay adaptation. Mary, Queen of Scots is based on John Guy's acclaimed biography My Heart is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Mary, Queen Of Scots First Look Photo From Film Starring Saoirse Ronan And Margot Robbie

photograph by John Mathieson

Filming has begun on location in England and Scotland on the Working Title Films production of Mary, Queen of Scots, starring Saoirse Ronan in the title role opposite Margot Robbie as Elizabeth I.

Josie Rourke, artistic director of The Donmar Warehouse, makes her feature directorial debut on the movie. Focus Features holds worldwide rights and will release Mary, Queen of Scots in the Us and Universal Pictures International (Upi) will distribute the film internationally.

The producers of Mary, Queen of Scots are Working Title co-chairs Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, and Debra Hayward, all Academy Award nominees as producers of Best Picture Oscar nominee Les Misérables.

Beau Willimon, an Academy Award nominee for The Ides of March and Emmy Award nominee for “House of Cards”, has written the screenplay adaptation. Mary, Queen of Scots is based on John Guy’s acclaimed biography My Heart is My
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Guy Ritchie goes medieval with “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword”

Ever since Game of Thrones became a huge hit on television, there has periodically been an attempt to replicate that sort of work on the big screen. This week, the latest shot is taken by filmmaker Guy Ritchie with his origin story/potential franchise starter King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. In tackling another blockbuster, Ritchie is firmly entrenching himself in a world far removed from his smaller British gangster tales that gave him his start. Regardless of the quality of the film itself, it’s interesting to see an auteur take a hard right turn like this one in particular has. He’s attempting to replicate what’s working on HBO here with this origin story, which is easier said than done. The movie is a look at how the boy king Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) was robbed of his birthright and the lengths he’ll ultimately go to get it back.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Logan cinematographer talks about filming the series' most emotional scene

  • JoBlo
I think it goes without saying that if you haven't seen Logan yet, there are going to be some Spoilers in this article! In any case, Logan's cinematographer, John Mathieson, spoke to The Hollywood Reporter about the final scene of the film, and how he actually broke director James Mangold's trend of only using one camera in order to capture the action. You can check out the... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Why Logan Ending Was Shot Different from the Rest of the Movie

  • MovieWeb
Why Logan Ending Was Shot Different from the Rest of the Movie
If you still haven't seen Hugh Jackman's Wolverine swan song Logan yet, there will be plenty of Spoilers below, specifically in regards to the ending. While some were expecting an emotional goodbye for Logan, it's probably safe to assume that no one was expecting the emotional powerhouse finale that the movie delivered, and as it turns out, cinematographer John Mathieson used a different technique that he hadn't used in the entire movie, to capture the full emotional weight of this scene. This is your last chance to avoid Spoilers, so read on at your own risk.

The final moments of Logan were capped by a scene that The Hollywood Reporter believes is one of the most "emotional ever filmed for a superhero movie." The tender moment features the death of Logan, as he shares his final fleeting seconds with his daughter, X-23 (Dafne Keen). He tells her not to
See full article at MovieWeb »

Logan – Review

One of the reasons why many fall in love with comic books is because they have a history of focusing on people treated like outsiders. They tell stories about individuals who feel different – men and women simply trying to live a normal life while dealing with an intolerant world. With many of the superhero film adaptations, the approach to telling these stories has been wrong. You usually watch a superhero character that also has human characteristics… not the other way around. The focus is on the “super” difference, not on the idea that humanity is actually comprised of individuals with differences (some big, some small). It’s interesting how most superhero film adaptations get this confused.

Logan successfully corrects this by weaving humanity through the title character’s adamantium body. Wolverine has the unique power to miraculously heal himself within seconds. But now as an old man, Wolverine is less
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

“Logan” is one of the best comic book adaptations of all time

It’s rare that a comic book or superhero movie becomes truly critically acclaimed and catches on with awards season. It happened with The Dark Knight, for example. To a lesser extent, it happened last year with Deadpool. This week, Logan opens and very well might become the next. This is not only one of the most mature outings of this nature, it’s one of the most violent as well. Closer to a western than an action flick, it’s really something special. Fans of Wolverine will both be delighted and shocked at what everyone has accomplished here. This film really gets 2017 going. The year has its first actually great movie now. The film is the latest in a long line of X-Men sequels, while also functioning as a third solo Wolverine flick. It’s a loose adaptation of the Old Man Logan storyline, set in the future and
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Logan movie review: wounded Wolverine, dangerous beast

MaryAnn’s quick take… The X-Men series — the entire superhero genre — has never seen a film like Logan before: raw, rageful, tormented, human. Best of the series yet. I’m “biast” (pro): mostly love the X-Men movies; love Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

With their extended metaphor about mutation as a stand-in for all the many reasons humans find to be bigoted toward other humans, the X-Men stories have always been perhaps the most grounded of the superhero universes, at least in their exploration of what it means to be “super” in a world where “super” is feared and hated, where “super” is ostracized. The mutants of X-Men are just ordinary people with unusual talents that, for the most part, they have to hide, and the movies in this series — of which we have had 10, counting this one,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

‘Logan’ Could Be One of the Best Superhero Movies Ever Made: Critical Roundup

  • Indiewire
‘Logan’ Could Be One of the Best Superhero Movies Ever Made: Critical Roundup
The first round of reviews are in for “Logan,” and they’re largely positive. The latest — and supposedly last — Wolverine movie starring Hugh Jackman is currently sitting pretty at 97% on Rotten Tomatoes and a 73 on Metacritic, with IndieWire’s David Ehrlich calling it “better as an agitated Western than as a fading superhero movie (or a listless cross-country chase)” and saying that “the most cantankerous X-Man’s final outing is a scaled-back affair that nevertheless knows how to swing for the fences.”

Read More: ‘Logan’ Review: Hugh Jackman Saves The Best Wolverine Movie For Last

Sheri Linden of the Hollywood Reporter is firmly in the positive camp, too:

“Seamlessly melding Marvel mythology with Western mythology, James Mangold has crafted an affectingly stripped-down stand-alone feature, one that draws its strength from Hugh Jackman’s nuanced turn as a reluctant, all but dissipated hero.”

Time’s Stephanie Zacharek is less impressed:

“…no
See full article at Indiewire »

New King Arthur trailer lands: Discover the Legend

New King Arthur trailer: Warner Brothers have debuted a very brief new look at the forthcoming re-invention of the classic story from Guy Ritchie.

The new King Arthur trailer has debuted online. The 45-second promo for the film, which has a the full title King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword, finally comes to cinemas this coming May.

Charlie Hunnam leads the cast of the film, which also includes Jude Law, Astrid Bergès-Frisbey, Djimon Hounsou, Aidan Gillen and Eric Bana. Guy Ritchie directs from a screenplay by Joby Harold and Ritchie and frequent collaborator Lionel Wigram.

I am here now because of you – you created me.”

The film is an iconoclastic take on the classic Excalibur myth, tracing Arthur’s journey from the streets to the throne.

When the child Arthur’s father is murdered, Vortigern (Jude Law), Arthur’s uncle, seizes the crown. Robbed of his birthright and with no idea who he truly is,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Tallinn: Russian cinema in the spotlight at European Genre Forum

  • ScreenDaily
Tallinn: Russian cinema in the spotlight at European Genre Forum
Speakers included Russian producer Alexander Rodnyansky, American producer John D. Heinsen, and cinematographer John Mathieson.

A focus on Russian cinema was the main event at this year’s European Genre Forum, held at the Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival (Nov 11-27).

Producer Alexander Rodnyansky – whose credits include Fedor Bondarchuk’s war epic Stalingrad, Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Oscar-nominated Leviathan, and Robert Rodriguez’s Machete Kills – gave a talk about the state of Russian cinema, moderated by Black Nights festival director Tiina Lokk.

Rodnyansky [pictured top with Tiina Lokk] is at the festival with The Duelist, which premiered at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, a historical epic starring Petr Fedorov as a deadly gun-for-hire.

“Since 2000 Russian cinema got back the ambition to produce genre movies,” he said.

“Russian genre cinema has the potential to come up with really ambitious projects and to recoup investments in a single language territory [in Russia].”

He explained that he had focussed his career on “high quality movies” and had
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Charlie Hunnam Stars In King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword Trailer

Acclaimed filmmaker Guy Ritchie brings his dynamic style to the epic fantasy action adventure King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword.

Starring Charlie Hunnam in the title role, the film is an iconoclastic take on the classic Excalibur myth, tracing Arthur’s journey from the streets to the throne.

On Saturday, Warner Bros. debuted the trailer during their Comic-Con presentation in Hall H.

When the child Arthur’s father is murdered, Vortigern (Jude Law), Arthur’s uncle, seizes the crown. Robbed of his birthright and with no idea who he truly is, Arthur comes up the hard way in the back alleys of the city. But once he pulls the sword from the stone, his life is turned upside down and he is forced to acknowledge his true legacy…whether he likes it or not.

Starring with Hunnam (FX’s “Sons of Anarchy”) and Oscar nominee Law (“Cold Mountain,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: Lead-footed 'Pan' smothers the whimsy with a wrong-headed script

  • Hitfix
Review: Lead-footed 'Pan' smothers the whimsy with a wrong-headed script
Why is it so hard to make a good Peter Pan film? By my count, there's one great film version of the story, and it's not the Disney version. Maybe the problem can be best summed up by noting that when Pj Hogan released his version in 2003, there were several critics who clutched their pearls and freaked out and acted nervous about the way the story's subtext threatened to become text. Why? Because he told the story the right way, and when you tell the story the right way, it is crystal clear that "Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up" is about that transitional moment when we cross from being children into something else. It is about loss of innocence and the fear of that loss. It is about a refusal to allow adulthood to gain any foothold, and what it is one would have to deny to stay a child forever.
See full article at Hitfix »

Film Review: ‘Pan’

Film Review: ‘Pan’
Of all the recent big-budget studio films to re-imagine beloved children’s tales as garish, CGI-choked sensory overloads stripped of all whimsy or childlike wonder, Joe Wright’s “Pan” is certainly the most technically sophisticated. The director displays his typical formal virtuosity and keen eye for young talent here (Aussie newcomer Levi Miller is assured in the title role), but it’s not enough to enliven the depressing dourness of the film’s worldview. Positioned as a prequel to J.M. Barrie’s classic Peter Pan stories, “Pan” swaps puckish mischief and innocence for doses of Steampunk design, anachronistic music, a stock “chosen one” narrative and themes of child labor, warfare and unsustainable mineral mining. Worldwide box office will likely be strong, especially overseas, but the bubble for these joyless fairy-tale revisions cannot pop quickly enough.

There is perhaps no clearer illustration of “Pan’s” guiding principles than its treatment of pixie dust.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Man from U.N.C.L.E.’ is a Stylish Throwback to 60s Spy Cinema

  • SoundOnSight
The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

Written by Guy Ritchie and Lionel Wigram

Directed by Guy Ritchie

USA, 2015

It’s the 1960s. The Cuban Missile Crisis is still fresh in memory. Tension between the USA and Russia are at an all-time high. Seems like the perfect time for their top agents to work together, right? Suave former thief and CIA operative Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) infiltrates East Berlin to get spunky car mechanic Gaby (Alicia Vikander) out of there to assist him in locating her missing scientist father. On their tail is Ilya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer), Kgb’s top agent and human tank. However, circumstances force the two enemies to work together as partners in order to thwart a nuclear threat. Based on the 1960’s TV Show of the same name, The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is director Guy Ritchie’s stab at the spy genre. For better or for worse (mostly better
See full article at SoundOnSight »

"The Man from U.N.C.L.E." versus "Straight Outta Compton" at the Box-Office

It.s .The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. versus .Straight Outta Compton. at the box-office this weekend. .U.N.C.L.E. is based on the popular 1960s TV series. This one stars Henry Cavill as an American spy and Armie Hammer as his Russian counterpart. It.s directed by Guy Ritchie. .Straight Outta Compton. is the big-screen docu-drama of the rise and fall of N.W.A. Which one is my pick of the week? Take a look!

Official .The Man From U.N.C.L.E.. Synopsis

Henry Cavill ("Man of Steel") stars as Napoleon Solo opposite Armie Hammer ("The Social Network") as Illya Kuryakin in director Guy Ritchie's "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.," a fresh take on the hugely popular 1960s television series. Set against the backdrop of the early 1960s, at the height of the Cold War, "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." centers on CIA agent Solo and Kgb agent Kuryakin.
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Film Review: ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’

Film Review: ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’
Whatever tough-guy notion of 1960s masculinity Robert Vaughn and David McCallum once embodied as reluctantly paired Cold War rivals has clearly gone the way of the Berlin Wall in the otherwise retro-flavored “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” a PG-13-rated loose-nukes caper whose target audience is too young to remember the classic spy show that inspired it — much less the once-frosty deadlock between American capitalism and Soviet communism that pits its distractingly handsome leading men against one another. Starring Henry Cavill as American art thief Napoleon Solo and Armie Hammer as Kgb operative Illya Kuryakin, Guy Ritchie’s latest feels more suave and restrained than his typically hyperkinetic fare, trading rough-and-tumble attitude for pretty-boy posturing. And though the pic is solidly made, its elegant vintage flavor simply doesn’t feel modern enough to cut through the tough summer competition. Those seeking stylish spies will surely wait for “Spectre” or that promised “Kingsman” sequel instead.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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