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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

10 items from 2014


Showbiz Photographer Guy Webster Captured Hollywood Zeitgeist

20 November 2014 2:23 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In the introduction to the new book “Big Shots: The Photography of Guy Webster,” musician Brian Wilson, a longtime friend of Webster, writes, “I  am so glad that Guy was there to document the making of history and thrilled to invite you into his book.” And Webster’s book is a thrill for anyone interested in the L.A. music and film scene of the ’60s and ’70s, when artists were breaking boundaries and building a new aesthetic.

Webster photographed the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones, the Doors, Harry Nilsson, Liza Minnelli, Igor Stravinsky, Henry ManciniKirk Douglas, Rock Hudson, Harry Dean Stanton, Cher (and Sonny) and just about anyone else making the scene.

He also did album covers, like “Turn! Turn! Turn!” for the Byrds, which was shot at Webster’s studio in his parents’ Beverly Hills home, according to guitarist Chris Hillman.

Webster is the son of Oscar-winning lyricist Paul Francis Webster. »

- Carole Horst

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Tiff 2014. Correspondences #3

9 September 2014 7:27 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Dear Danny,

I also rode the Tokyo Tribe rollercoaster, and my head hasn’t stopped spinning yet. Slamming together the most rabid excesses of the worlds of manga comics and hip-hop music, it’s a continuous blitzkrieg: Sono’s ne plus ultra of sheer brio, and, along with Godard’s Adieu au language, the festival’s most assaultive sensory experience so far. Its pinwheel neon hues, inflamed camera movements and acrobatic gangland mugging are straight-up dilations of Seijun Suzuki’s vintage gonzo pulp—indeed, the first time I ever heard Japanese rapping on screen was during a brief interlude in Suzuki’s mock-opera Princess Raccoon. I doubt even that veteran iconoclast, however, could have dreamed up the bit in Tokyo Tribe when the vile underworld kingpin (Riki Takeuchi), swollen like an obscene parade float, pulverizes a field of warring gangs with a Gatling gun held, of course, crotch-level. Such moments of absolute glee abound, »

- Fernando F. Croce

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What Do I Need to Know About Doctor Who If I’ve Never Watched Before and Want to Start?

22 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

You don’t know why you haven’t watched it. Your nerdier friends have loved it since it was on PBS back in the day, and you knew a girl in high school who knit her own giant scarf during homeroom because that actor who looked kind of like Harpo Marx wore one when he played “the Doctor.” Maybe you’re like me, and when Doctor Who fandom started pushing Star Wars and Star Trek out of your local comic convention, your adolescent heart turned cold and rejected the low-budget British sci-fi series out of hand.But now you feel out of step. It’s one of those zeitgeist-y Game of Thrones “Winter Is Coming” moments, and you’re on the outside, looking in. You’ve heard that the new (well, newish, the reboot was almost ten years ago) Who is more popular in the U.S. than it’s »

- Ivan Cohen

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Summer sitcom rewind: 'I Love Lucy' - 'Job Switching'

27 June 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

We're continuing this periodic summer project where we revisit classic sitcom episode. This week we're going waaaay back to the 1950s for one of the most famous television half hours of them all: "Job Switching," from "I Love Lucy" season 2, coming up just as soon as I show you the creases on these silk stockings... "Job Switching," which first aired in 1952, is by far going to be the oldest episode we do in this series (unless "The Honeymooners" magically starts streaming before the summer is out), and I'm going to be very curious for your reactions to it. Ken Levine occasionally will do posts where he asks his readers what they think of vintage sitcom episodes, and the reaction tends to be mixed, and leaning more towards negative among people who didn't grow up in one of the previous peak periods for multi-cam comedy. In terms of sitcoms that have »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Oprah Winfrey Releases 1983 Audition Tape, Explains Her First Name (Video)

7 May 2014 8:10 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

How did Oprah Winfrey first nab the job of hosting A.M. Chicago back in 1984? By sending in an audition tape that was compiled overnight, and details how the would-be media mogul came to have a name that's somewhere between a biblical reference and Harpo Marx. Photos: The Resurgence of Oprah Winfrey Earlier this week, the Own channel posted a YouTube clip of Winfrey's original 1983 audition tape, which she introduced as a reel she put together overnight with an editor, since she didn't keep track of her stories as well as she should have. Wearing a black-and-cream

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- Ashley Lee

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Dr Who: films of Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy

15 April 2014 2:13 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Alex Westthorp 16 Apr 2014 - 07:00

Alex's trek through the film roles of actors who've played the Doctor reaches Peter Davison, Colin Baker and Sylvester McCoy...

Read the previous part in this series, Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker, here.

In March 1981, as he made his Doctor Who debut, Peter Davison was already one the best known faces on British television. Not only was he the star of both a BBC and an ITV sitcom - Sink Or Swim and Holding The Fort - but as the young and slightly reckless Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great And Small, about the often humorous cases of Yorkshire vet James Herriot and his colleagues, he had cemented his stardom. The part led, indirectly, to his casting as the venerable Time Lord.

The recently installed Doctor Who producer, John Nathan-Turner, had been the Production Unit Manager on »

- louisamellor

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DVD, Blu-ray Release: Love Happy

14 April 2014 2:01 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: May 6, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

The 1949 music-filled comedy Love Happy was the final film starring the legendary Marx Brothers (Duck Soup, Animal Crackers).

In the film, Harpo Marx is a true patron of the arts, taking from the rich to help feed a group of poor actors struggling to open a new musical without financial backers. He unknowingly makes off with the missing Romanoff diamonds when he shoplifts a tin of sardines from a classy Manhattan market. The diamonds have been smuggled into the country by a sinful yet sizzlingly beautiful jewel thief, Madame Egelichi (Ilona Massey). The Madame traces the tin back to the theater and becomes the show’s financial backer. Hoping to recover the missing diamonds, she and her henchmen nearly bring the whole house down in a madcap race to retrieve the jewels on opening night.

In addition to Harpo, »

- Laurence

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The Best and Worst Comic Relief Movie Characters

13 April 2014 6:11 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Comic relief characters are written to try and make us laugh. Some of them are better than others. Join us as we discuss some of the best and worst comic relief characters in film.

Each month the Cinelinx staff will write a handful of articles covering a specified film-related topic. These articles will be notified by the Movielinx banner. Movielinx is an exploration and discussion of our personal connections with film. We’ll even submit reviews of the films we discuss so that you can get a better idea of what we’re talking about. April is National Humor Month, and because of this we will honor comedy in film. What makes you laugh? Feel free to add your own comments or reviews of movies that tickle your funny bone.

 

 

Comic relief characters play an important part in film. They can be major characters or minor ones, but their purpose »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Library of Congress' Packard Campus: Rare Double Screening of Box Office Cataclysm

26 March 2014 6:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Screwball comedy movies, rare screenings of epic box office disaster: Library of Congress’ Packard Theater in April 2014 (photo: Cary Grant and Irene Dunne in ‘The Awful Truth’) In April 2014, the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater in Culpeper, Virginia, will celebrate Hollywood screwball comedy movies, from the Marx Brothers’ antics to Peter Bogdanovich’s early ’70s homage What’s Up, Doc?, a box office blockbuster starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O’Neal. Additionally, the Packard Theater will present a couple of rarities, including an epoch-making box office disaster that led to the demise of a major studio. Among Packard’s April 2014 screwball comedies are the following: Leo McCarey’s Duck Soup (Saturday, April 5) — actually more zany, wacky, and totally insane than merely "screwball" — in which Groucho Marx stars as the recently (un)elected dictator of Freedonia, abetted by siblings Harpo Marx and Chico Marx, in addition to Groucho’s perennial foil, »

- Andre Soares

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Film Review: ‘Ain’t Misbehavin”

17 February 2014 11:37 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In spanning eight decades, Marcel Ophuls’ filmed autobiography “Ain’t Misbehavin’” incorporates a wide array of approaches: nostalgia-filled interviews with celebrated contemporaries, whimsical excerpts from Hollywood films, samplings from his own and his father’s oeuvres, and jaunts to the sites of past traumas and triumphs. Ophuls obviously greatly relishes his role as cosmopolitan raconteur, but his spontaneous delivery can feel over-rehearsed, his focus erratic. Film buffs will doubtless appreciate his imaginative use of free-associative film clips and anecdotes about Preston Sturges, Marlene Dietrich and Francois Truffaut, but “Misbehavin’” ultimately seems too patchy to resonate with wider audiences.

Ophuls’ remembrance of his early life offers a nearly miraculous confluence of personal, cinematic and world history. As the son of famed German-Jewish director Max Ophuls, who left Germany for France and from there escaped to Hollywood, young Marcel found himself at the center of international film production as well as the Holocaust, »

- Ronnie Scheib

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

10 items from 2014


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