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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 49 – Twilight Time Appreciation Show

We change things up by focusing on a boutique label, Twilight Time, that has found success through a unique business model. Mark and Aaron happen to be big fans, and feel that we have directly contributed towards some of their profits. We talk about the company, their business model, why they have succeeded, and we address some common critiques. We also review a few discs each, and finally count down our favorite Twilight Time titles.

About Nick Redman:

London-born Nick Redman, one of Hollywood’s leading producers of movie music, is also an award-winning documentary filmmaker. An Academy Award nominee as producer of the 1996 Warner Brothers documentary, The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage, he went on to write, produce, and direct A Turning of the Earth: John Ford, John Wayne and The Searchers (1998), which became a prize-winner at multiple film festivals.

As a consultant to the Fox Music
See full article at CriterionCast »

Blu-ray Review – Three Brothers (1981)

Three Brothers, 1981

Directed by Francesco Rosi

Written by Tonino Guera, Francesco Rosi

Starring: Phillipe Noiret, Michele Placido, Vittorio Mezzogiorno, Andréa Ferréol, Maddalena Crippa, Rosaria Tafuri, Marta Zoffoli, Charles Vanel

Synopsis :

Three brothers are summoned by their father to be together in the wake of their mother’s death. The three reflect on their differing lives and positions within Italian society.

Francesco Rosi’s emotive and multi-layered study of three characters – and by extension Italian life and dynamics as a whole – is a haunting, dream-like work of cinematic art.

Three Brothers (Tre Fratelli), adapted from Andrei Platanov’s The Third Son and directed with aplomb by Rosi (Salvatore Giuliano, The Moment of Truth), tells the story of Italy’s past, present and possible future through the memories, dreams and imaginings of the central characters.

Beginning with an extreme close-up of rats crawling around a filthy urban floor, the audience is
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Watch “Modern Family:” Fourth Season Finale

Everyone flies down to Florida to be with Phil after his mom’s passing. Claire helps Phil with his mom’s last wish for Phil’s dad, Mitch helps Gloria contend with an outstanding arrest warrant in Florida, Cam finds himself fitting right into an elderly women’s group, and Jay runs into his first.

Favorite Moments:

“It’s Florida. If I want to sweat more, I’ll just move my arms.” “Oh no, she’s going to ask me to throw her ashes in the Pope’s face!” Mitchell Pritchett – Man of The People. It takes Cam about five minutes to become one of the gossiping old biddies. The cornucopia of faboo older actresses, including Anita Gillette, Millicent Martin, Mary Jo Catlett, and an almost unrecognizable Ann Magnuson. The final scene with the funeral and the fireworks was very sweet, and a nice way to cap the season.

What were your favorite moments?
See full article at The Backlot »

Aubrey Woods obituary

Graceful stage actor who stood out in Doctor Who on TV and the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

In a long and distinguished career, the actor Aubrey Woods, who has died aged 85, covered the waterfront, from West End revues and musicals to TV series and films, most notably, perhaps, singing The Candy Man in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971), starring Gene Wilder, and playing the Controller in the Day of the Daleks storyline in Doctor Who (1972).

Tall and well-favoured in grace and authority on the stage, he played Fagin in the musical Oliver! for three years, succeeding Ron Moody in the original 1960 production. He was equally in demand on BBC radio, writing and appearing in many plays, including his own adaptations of the Mapp and Lucia novels by Ef Benson (he was a vice-president of the Ef Benson society).

In the early part of his career he
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Aubrey Woods obituary

Graceful stage actor who stood out in Doctor Who on TV and the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

In a long and distinguished career, the actor Aubrey Woods, who has died aged 85, covered the waterfront, from West End revues and musicals to TV series and films, most notably, perhaps, singing The Candy Man in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971), starring Gene Wilder, and playing the Controller in the Day of the Daleks storyline in Doctor Who (1972).

Tall and well-favoured in grace and authority on the stage, he played Fagin in the musical Oliver! for three years, succeeding Ron Moody in the original 1960 production. He was equally in demand on BBC radio, writing and appearing in many plays, including his own adaptations of the Mapp and Lucia novels by Ef Benson (he was a vice-president of the Ef Benson society).

In the early part of his career he
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Chuck': Say hello to Agent X

"Chuck" had a whole lot to pack into 41 minutes or so of story this week -- a pair of pre-wedding parties, a heart-to-heart between Chuck and Ellie and a big development in this season's ongoing spy story. "Chuck vs. Agent X" felt slightly overstuffed at times, but the good far outweighed the bad in an episode that deftly set the stage for the final two episodes of the season.

Even if you had your suspicions about the identity of Agent X, the revelation at the end worked. Ellie's introduction to Castle and the spy world, which followed her and Chuck finally coming clean with one another, also played well. And comically stoned Jeff is pretty much always good.

If anything, the episode maybe could have used a little bit less time on the bachelor-party prep and the trip to Las Vecas (as opposed to Las Vegas) before Ray Wise (Ok,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Sean Connery by Christopher Bray

This biography of Sean Connery by an adoring fan just misses the mark, says Simon Callow

Regardless of what you may think of his acting, Sean Connery has been a highly prominent figure in the celluloid landscape of the past 40 years in two particular manifestations. First, and most potently, as James Bond; second, as the embodiment of a certain kind of grizzled wisdom, of which perhaps the most notable is Indiana Jones's father. To have created two universally recognised archetypes in the course of a career is no mean feat, and one well worth investigating. Christopher Bray's book is just such an investigation, but it comes from an unexpected angle: that of unabashed adulation. Not, as Bray is at pains to point out, for the man Sean Connery, but for what his image as an actor embodies.

"I like watching Sean Connery. I like watching him move through a room.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

See also

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