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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Boogens (1981)

  • DailyDead
Cynicism isn’t hard to come by in the horror genre; any Italian cannibal or home invasion flick will satiate your desire for an outlook on man’s worst transgressions. Conversely, it’s even harder to find a film with such a buoyant feel that is at odds with the terror on display. Well, folks, may I present to you The Boogens (1981), an endearing charmer of a subterranean monster movie. By the time it’s over, you may want to give it a big old hug.

Released by Jensen Farley Pictures in September (with Paramount buying up the TV rights) on a budget of $600,000 Us, The Boogens did nothing to impress critics. However, a certain Stephen King loved the hell out of it, and his praise would grace the advertising as it did with his accolades of The Evil Dead (1981). (A King blurb held a lot of truck in those days.
See full article at DailyDead »

The wonderful weirdness of the 1978 Doctor Strange TV movie

Mike Cecchini Nov 4, 2016

Despite what you may have heard, the 1978 Doctor Strange TV movie is one of Marvel's better early TV efforts...

Marvel's 1978 Doctor Strange TV movie (officially known as Dr. Strange) is admittedly, something of an acquired taste, but there's an undeniable charm and air of mystery about it.

See related Joseph Kosinski on Tron 3 and The Black Hole remake

It's a deliberately paced origin story set in New York City that's light on action and long on exposition and sometimes questionable special effects. The eastern elements of Strange's origin are scrubbed in favour of Arthurian overtones with Morgan le Fay (Jessica Walter playing not necessarily the Marvel Comics version) as the villain and The Ancient One replaced by "Lindmer" a mentor who is, essentially, Merlin (wonderfully played by Sir John Mills). Clyde Kusatsu's Wong isn't a robed manservant, but an ally and student of the Ancient One,
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Twister': 10 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Summer Blockbuster

  • Moviefone
Released 20 years ago this week (on May 10, 1996), "Twister" wasn't just a blockbuster special-effects spectacle that made viable movie stars out of Helen Hunt an Bill Paxton.

It was also the "Apocalypse Now" of weather-themed disaster movies. The film's production was marked by severe injuries to the stars and crew, a runaway budget, and the cinematographers openly rebelling against the director. Here are the real-life twists you didn't hear about from the tornado drama's tempestuous shoot.

1. The "Twister" screenplay is credited to "Jurassic Park" novelist Michael Crichton and his wife, Anne-Marie Martin, but it was revised by such celebrated script doctors as Joss Whedon (who dropped out of the project because he contracted bronchitis), Steven Zaillian (who dropped out because he was leaving for his honeymoon), and Jeff Nathanson, who was on the set and kept rewriting the script until the end of the shoot.

2. Helen Hunt was director Jan de Bont
See full article at Moviefone »

Doctor Strange: the first attempt to bring him to the screen

Ryan Lambie Nov 4, 2016

Nearly 40 years ago, Doctor Strange got his first shot at screen glory. We take a look back at the Dr Strange TV pilot...

Even the biggest superheroes had to start somewhere. Batman made his screen debut in a 15-part serial for Columbia, where he spent the entire time tussling with a ‘Japanese’ criminal called Dr Daka (actually Irish-American character actor J Carrol Naish). Superman also made his first live-action appearance in a 40s serial, with Kirk Alyn wearing some very large underpants as the Man of Steel.

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Marvel’s roster of characters started to get their own shows in the 1970s, with Spider-Man leading the way and The Incredible Hulk following him with a successful, five-year run on CBS.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Sledge Hammer!: Would the ABC Comedy Work 30 Years Later?

  • TVSeriesFinale
Sledge Hammer! premiered on ABC 30 years ago and was cancelled after only two seasons. In a recent interview with Splitsider, creator Alan Spencer discussed his short-lived cop comedy and its upcoming revival special in San Francisco.

Sledge Hammer! starred David Rasche as a comically absurd version of Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry character. Anne-Marie Martin and Harrison Page also starred.

Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Review: Into The Storm Comes Alive When The Wind Blows Hard

"The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind," sang Bob Dylan in the early 1960s. Fifty years later, the question is, Why would anyone want to make a new version of Twister? As someone who once stood, fascinated, in downtown Fort Worth, Texas, watching a storm a couple of blocks away before a woman said, "Hey, that's a twister!," I can certainly testify to the endless appeal of giant freaking storms. (I took shelter in the parking garage of the building where I worked, and watched with other eyewitnesses as the tornado blew through downtown.) If you, too, are endlessly fascinated by tornadoes -- and especially if you don't remember the 1996 blockbuster movie, written by Michael Crichton and Anne-Marie Martin, and directed by...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Boogens (1981)

  • Planet Fury
Directed by: James L. Conway

Written by: David O'Malley, Bob Hunt

Featuring: Rebecca Balding, Fred McCarren, Anne-Marie Martin, Jeff Harlan

For horror fans, 1981 was a banner year. First, we were inundated with over a dozen slasher flicks, including genre classics such as Halloween II, The Burning, The Prowler, My Bloody Valentine and Friday the 13th Part 2. The year also included future classics like The Howling, The Evil Dead, An American Werewolf in London and The Beyond, so it's no surprise a little monster movie called The Boogens became lost in all the cinematic mayhem. But the film developed a following and is now out on DVD for the first time.

The Boogens opens by recounting the tale of a silver mine that closed 100 years ago after a devastating tunnel collapse. The sole survivor said the miners who survived the cave-in were attacked by something living in the tunnels, though
See full article at Planet Fury »

Get Ready to Stare in Disbelief at The Boogens Artwork!

We've talked about it before as there have been whispers, but now we can officially confirm that the long lost Eighties classic creature feature The Boogens is officially on its way to Blu-ray and DVD! It's actually happening! Bad movie lovers rejoice!

While there is still no word on the extras, if any at all, The Boogens, yes, The Boogens, will be headed home on August 7, 2012, courtesy of Olive Films.

The flick, directed by James L. Conway (Hanger 18), stars Rebecca Balding, Fred McCarren, Anne-Marie Martin, Jeff Harlan, and John Crawford.

Synopsis

In a small town near Denver, two young men begin to explore a long-abandoned old mine recently re-opened by a group of miners. When one of the men is discovered missing, his friends begin a search that leads them to horrifying consequences. They're all unaware of the evil that's been unleashed, and soon, one by one, a monster that
See full article at Dread Central »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: The Boogens

  • Disc Dish
Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Aug. 7, 2012

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

The 1981 cult horror movie The Boogens finally makes its DVD and Blu-ray debut!

In a small town near Denver, two young guys begin to explore a long-abandoned, boarded up silver mine old mine. When one of them goes missing, his begin a search that reveals something horrifying: By opening up the mine, a brood of nasty little monsters–turtle-like, agile, talon-clawed and sharp-toothed—have been unleashed. The grisly truth is quickly revealed as the titular creatures begans to knock the townsfolk one by one.

Directed by James L. Conway (Hanger 18), The Boogens stars Rebecca Balding, Fred McCarren, Anne-Marie Martin and Jeff Harlan.

In a rare instance of an archival Olive Film’s release having any supplemental materials, the DVD and Blu-ray of the R-rated film include a commentary by director Conway, star Balding and screenwriter David O’Malley.

Buy
See full article at Disc Dish »

Rip Michael Crichton

  • Fangoria
The Los Angeles Times reports that author/screenwriter Michael Crichton died yesterday in La. The creator of Jurassic Park and numerous other science-fiction thrillers, who had been privately battling cancer, was 66.

The Chicago-born Crichton was an English major at Harvard University before dropping out to travel across Europe, then returned to Harvard to study medicine—a background that served him well both in his novels/screenplays and as creator of TV’s hit series ER. His first novel to hit the big screen was The Andromeda Strain, about a team of scientists trying to halt the spread of a deadly extraterrestrial virus, filmed in 1971 by director Robert Wise; a new Andromeda adaptation aired last year on A&E. Crichton made his feature directorial debut (following the 1972 TV movie Pursuit) with 1973’s Westworld, which he also scripted, set in a futuristic amusement park populated by robots that violently turn on the guests.
See full article at Fangoria »

Rip Michael Crichton

  • Fangoria
The Los Angeles Times reports that author/screenwriter Michael Crichton died yesterday in La. The creator of Jurassic Park and numerous other science-fiction thrillers, who had been privately battling cancer, was 66.

The Chicago-born Crichton was an English major at Harvard University before dropping out to travel across Europe, then returned to Harvard to study medicine—a background that served him well both in his novels/screenplays and as creator of TV’s hit series ER. His first novel to hit the big screen was The Andromeda Strain, about a team of scientists trying to halt the spread of a deadly extraterrestrial virus, filmed in 1971 by director Robert Wise; a new Andromeda adaptation aired last year on A&E. Crichton made his feature directorial debut (following the 1972 TV movie Pursuit) with 1973’s Westworld, which he also scripted, set in a futuristic amusement park populated by robots that violently turn on the guests.
See full article at Fangoria »

See also

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