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Masters of Cinema Cast – Episode 51 – Day of the Outlaw

We return with a catch up about upcoming MoC releases, Criterion UK and a look at Andre de Toth’s Day of the Outlaw. Enjoy!

From Masters of Cinema:

Revered by the likes of Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino, the great director Andre de Toth made some of the most gripping and unusual American films of the 1950s, and Day of the Outlaw stands as one of his finest.

Robert Ryan plays the ruthless cattleman Blaise Starrett who rides into the small, snowbound town of Bitters to settle a feud with homesteader Hal Crane (Alan Marshal) over access to land, with one eye on rekindling a past love affair with Crane’s wife Helen (Tina Stuart). But once a band of brutal outlaws, led by the notorious Captain Jack Bruhn (Burl Ives), enters and takes the townspeople hostage, the situation becomes a powder keg ready to blow.

Set against extraordinary winter landscapes,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Oberon on TCM: Actress with Mystery Past Wears Men's Clothes, Fights Nazis

Merle Oberon movies: Mysterious star of British and American cinema. Merle Oberon on TCM: Donning men's clothes in 'A Song to Remember,' fighting hiccups in 'That Uncertain Feeling' Merle Oberon is Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month of March 2016. The good news: the exquisite (and mysterious) Oberon, whose ancestry has been a matter of conjecture for decades, makes any movie worth a look. The bad news: TCM isn't offering any Oberon premieres despite the fact that a number of the actress' films – e.g., Temptation, Night in Paradise, Pardon My French, Interval – can be tough to find. This evening, March 18, TCM will be showing six Merle Oberon movies released during the first half of the 1940s. Never a top box office draw in the United States, Oberon was an important international star all the same, having worked with many of the top actors and filmmakers of the studio era.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Scott Reviews André de Toth’s Day of the Outlaw [Masters of Cinema Blu-ray Review]

Who is the outlaw in Day of the Outlaw? Undoubtedly Burl Ives’ villainous Jack Bruhn – he leads a band of bad guys into the remote Wyoming town, holding everyone there loosely as hostages until he decides to move along. But he’s not an outlaw the way we typically understand it; for one thing, he wears a Union (not even Confederate!) officer’s uniform, and his legacy of shame is more rooted in military than more overtly criminal activities. His band of men are far more outlaws than he, but there is no singular one.

Instead, I want to pivot attention to Blaise Starrett (Robert Ryan), the ostensible hero of the story, who starts the film ready to murder a farmer (Alan Marshal) over the latter’s desire to put fences around his land, which Blaise is used to running his cattle through a couple times a year. That Blaise
See full article at CriterionCast »

Oldest Oscar Winner - and First Consecutive Winner - Dead at 104

Luise Rainer dies at age 104: Rainer was first consecutive Oscar winner, first two-time winner in acting categories and oldest surviving winner (photo: MGM star Luise Rainer in the mid-'30s.) The first consecutive Academy Award winner, the first two-time winner in the acting categories, and, at age 104, the oldest surviving Oscar winner as well, Luise Rainer (Best Actress for The Great Ziegfeld, 1936, and The Good Earth, 1937) died at her London apartment on December 30 -- nearly two weeks before her 105th birthday. Below is an article originally posted in January 2014, at the time Rainer turned 104. I'll be sharing more Luise Rainer news later on Tuesday. January 17, 2014: Inevitably, the Transformers movies' director Michael Bay (who recently had an on-camera "meltdown" after a teleprompter stopped working at the Consumer Electronics Show) and the Transformers movies' star Shia Labeouf (who was recently accused of plagiarism) were mentioned -- or rather, blasted, in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Luise Rainer Oscar Curse

In Mason Wiley and Damien Bona's Inside Oscar, Luise Rainer is quoted as saying the following about winning back-to-back Best Actress Academy Awards for The Great Ziegfeld (1936) and The Good Earth (1937): "The industry seemed to feel that having an Academy Award winner on their hands was sufficient to overcome bad story material, which was often handed out afterwards to a star under long-term contract." Of course, "bad story material" was handed to contract players regardless of whether or not they had won Academy Awards. Just ask Ann Sheridan, Olivia de Havilland, Myrna Loy, and all those who went on suspension because they refused what they saw as subpar screenplays. Also, Rainer herself didn't fare too badly in 1938, the year she received her second Academy Award: her three releases that year were Robert B. Sinclair's Dramatic School, with Alan Marshal and Paulette Goddard; Julien Duvivier's The Great Waltz,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Paulette Goddard Movie Schedule: An Ideal Husband, The Women

Paulette Goddard, Modern Times Paulette Goddard on TCM Part I: Modern Times, Reap The Wild Wind I've never watched Alexander Korda's British-made An Ideal Husband, a 1948 adaptation (by Lajos Biro) of Oscar Wilde's play, but it should be at least worth a look. The respectable cast includes Michael Wilding, Diana Wynyard, C. Aubrey Smith, Hugh Williams, Constance Collier, and Glynis Johns. George Cukor's film version of Clare Boothe Luce's hilarious The Women ("officially" adapted by Anita Loos and Jane Murfin) is definitely worth numerous looks; once or twice or even three times isn't/aren't enough to catch the machine-gun dialogue spewed forth by the likes of Goddard, Rosalind Russell, Joan Crawford, Mary Boland, Phyllis Povah, Lucile Watson, et al. A big hit at the time, The Women actually ended up in the red because of its high cost. Norma Shearer, aka The Widow Thalberg, was the nominal star; curiously,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movies... For Free! House on Haunted Hill (1959)

Showcasing classic movies that have fallen out of copyright and are available freely from the public domain (with streaming video!)...

House on Haunted Hill, 1959.

Directed by William Castle.

Starring Vincent Price, Carolyn Craig, Richard Long, Elisha Cook Jr., Carol Ohmart, Alan Marshal and Julie Mitchum.

A low-budget b-movie horror from 1959, William Castle's House on Haunted Hill stars Vincent Price as eccentric millionaire Frederick Loren, who invites five random strangers to attend a party for his fourth wife Annabelle (Carolyn Craig). Loren then offers them a proposal: to spend a night in his haunted mansion - the location of a series of brutal murders - in return for $10,000 each, payable upon their survival. Warning the guests that their host is psychotic, Annabelle soon commits suicide and the strangers begin to experience a series of macabre events with no means of escape from the terror...

Director Castle employed a unique promotional
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ginger Rogers’ Tender Comrade, Once Upon A Honeymoon TCM Schedule

Patricia Collinge, Kim Hunter, Ginger Rogers Tender Comrade Ginger RogersKitty Foyle, The Major And The Minor on TCM Photo: Ginger Rogers and James Stewart at the 1941 Academy Awards ceremony. Rogers won for Kitty Foyle, Stewart for The Philadelphia Story. Schedule and synopsis from the TCM website: 5:00pm [Romance] Kitty Foyle (1940) A girl from the wrong side of the tracks endures scandal and heartbreak when she falls for a high-society boy. Cast: Ginger Rogers, Dennis Morgan, James Craig, Eduardo Ciannelli Dir: Sam Wood Bw-108 mins. 7:00pm [Comedy] Tom, Dick And Harry (1941) A girl accepts three wedding proposals at once and dreams of marriage to each man. Cast: Ginger Rogers, George Murphy, Alan Marshal, Burgess Meredith Dir: Garson Kanin Bw-87 mins. 8:30pm [Comedy] Major and [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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