News

Jerry Seinfeld Bringing Ted L. Nancy's Letters From A Nut to the Geffen Playhouse

Letters from a Nut by Ted L. Nancy, a brand-new show based on the bestselling book series of prank letters and their responses from Ted L. Nancy aka Barry Marder, will debut in June at the Geffen Playhouse as part of the theater's Spotlight Entertainment Series. The show is produced by Jerry Seinfeld, and written by Nancy, who will star alongside Beth Kennedy and Sam Kwasman. Pierre Balloon will direct.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Jerry Seinfeld to Produce ‘Letters From a Nut by Ted L Nancy’ Stage Comedy at Geffen Playhouse

Jerry Seinfeld to Produce ‘Letters From a Nut by Ted L Nancy’ Stage Comedy at Geffen Playhouse
Jerry Seinfeld will make his L.A. stage producing debut on “Letters From a Nut by Ted L. Nancy,” a new comedy based on the best-selling series of books of prank letters by an everyman seeking assistance from corporations and government agencies. The show, written by and starring Barry Marder, will begin performances on June 23 at the Geffen Playhouse as part of the theater’s Spotlight Entertainment Series. The official opening night will be June 28 and the show will run through July 30. Pierre Balloón will direct the production, which will also star Beth Kennedy and Sam Kwasman. Also Read: Jerry Seinfeld.
See full article at The Wrap »

SnagFilms Commissions New 'Scammers' Web Series from Comedian Barry Marder

Streaming site SnagFilms has commissioned a new original series from Sundance Productions, “Scammers,” a short-form comedy web series by Barry Marder, creator of the character Ted L. Nancy.Marder is the author of the “Letters from a Nut” book series featuring the character of Ted; he was also one of the co-writers of “Bee Movie” with Jerry Seinfeld; and he appeared in the pilot episode of Seinfeld’s web series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” (above).Here’s the series’ official synopsis:How often do you get unsolicited emails, promising millions of dollars for doing nothing more than providing “[y]our bank account information, and the money will be deposited next day”? Most people ignore these emails knowing they are scams, but Ted L. Nancy wanted to know what would happen if he engaged. After long strings of real, increasingly absurd exchanges, written in his clever, sharp wit full of hilarious non-sequiturs,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

SnagFilms Commissions Original Web Series 'Scammers' from Comedian Barry Marder

  • Indiewire
SnagFilms has entered the web production business with"Scammers," a new original web series from Sundance Productions and comedian and writer Barry Marder, creator of the character Ted L. Nancy. The project will begin production in February with a spring 2014 release planned on SnagFilms (Indiewire's parent company). The online distributor has ordered 10 episodes of the comedy series with each running between 4-6 minutes. "Scammers" will follow Marder in his alter ego Ted L. Nancy as he responds to e-mail solicitations promising millions of dollars. Each self-contained episode will follow an email exchange between Ted and a different web scammer.  Marder, who first introduced the Nancy character in his book "Letters from a Nut" in 1997, will provide the voice of Ted L. Nancy, with other voice guests to be announced. "I received the first Ted L. Nancy book as a gift shortly after publication, and I had to sit on the floor to survive my laughter,
See full article at Indiewire »

SnagFilms Adds Web Series From Comedian Barry Marder (Exclusive)

Online distributor SnagFilms has picked up web series Scammers from comedian and writer Barry Marder. The project, which goes into production in February, is slated for a spring 2014 release. Produced by Sundance Productions, Scammers follows Marder under the pseudonym Ted L. Nancy as he responds to Internet con artists soliciting his bank account information. Photos: 2014's New Broadcast and Cable TV Shows Scammers represents SnagFilms’ first foray into production of a web series. "It's a testament to our belief in our partners, Sundance Productions and Barry Marder, that we’re stepping out of own comfort zone to do something really

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Moynahan, Sussman join TV projects

Moynahan, Sussman join TV projects
Bridget Moynahan has been tapped to co-star opposite Donnie Wahlberg in Jerry Bruckheimer's drama pilot for TNT "Bunker Hill."

Additionally, Kevin Sussman has landed the title role in Fox's comedy presentation "Sincerely, Ted L. Nancy," lifting the cast-contingency on the project, while Jessalyn Gilsig has joined "Glee," Ryan Murphy's pilot for Fox, as a regular.

"Bunker Hill," from Warner Horizon and Jerry Bruckheimer TV, explores the crime, corruption and deceit in the Bunker Hill section of Boston and centers on Mike Moriarty who returns to Boston as a cop protecting the streets he grew up on. Moynahan, repped by Endeavor and Brillstein Entertainment Partners, will play Mike's sister-in-law Erin, who has a love-hate relationship with him stemming from the death of her cop husband.

"Sincerely," from Lionsgate, centers on a regular guy (Sussman) who, after suffering through too many faulty products and customer service mishaps, decides to take
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Fox orders 'Nancy' presentation

Fox orders 'Nancy' presentation
Ted L. Nancy's "Letters From a Nut" books are heading into another TV reincarnation.

Fox has given a cast-contingent presentation order to "Sincerely, Ted L. Nancy," a partially scripted comedy based on the series of books that feature introductions by Jerry Seinfeld.

Nancy's identity has never been revealed, but the speculation has been that Seinfeld and/or his friend, comedian-writer Barry Marder, might be the real authors of the tomes, which include Ted's ridiculous customer service letters to real companies and the companies' equally absurd but real responses.

"Sincerely," from Lionsgate TV, centers on a regular guy who, after suffering through too many faulty products and customer service mishaps, decides to take on the corporations by writing letters that "seek to avenge the consumer frustrations of people everywhere."

Armed with the written responses from the companies he targets, Ted goes on missions filmed in a "Borat"-like mockumentary style, featuring him doing outrageous stunts involving regular people.

In addition to Marder, Chuck Martin, Gary Auberbach and Rob Lee also are said to be involved in the project.

"Letters" was first developed seven years ago at ABC as a half-hour alternative comedy.

A year ago, in partnership with Lionsgate, the auspices set up the project at Fox as an unscripted comedy.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Bee Movie

Bee Movie
This review was written for the theatrical release of "Bee Movie".Cartoonists have thoroughly explored the animal kingdom, giving anthropomorphic vigor to mice, dogs, cats, birds, donkeys, fish, pigs, bugs, dinosaurs, roadrunners, coyotes and even one big green ogre. Now it's the bees' turn in DreamWorks Animation's "Bee Movie".

Unfortunately, bees just aren't that funny. They talk funny now and then thanks to that force of comedy, Jerry Seinfeld, who co-wrote, co-produced and stars in his first animated feature. But they aren't intriguing cartoon creatures. Nor is the odd story Seinfeld and his collaborators dreamed up very inspired. The film labors too hard for its comic moments and never discovers a cartoon logic that will allow bees and humans to interact.

When "Bee Movie" opens, honey will equal money for the first week, but repeat business, so vital for animated films, is not likely to be heavy. Seinfeld's considerable and loyal following certainly will help.

Seinfeld's extraordinary humor, which propelled one of TV's most successful comedy series for nine years, is wildly cerebral and serendipitous. It's geared for making mountains out of molehills and exploring the minutiae of life in all its frustrating, explosively funny glory.

And nothing could be more cerebral than the idea of a bumble bee named Barry (voiced by Seinfeld) getting so outraged that humans are "stealing" honey for consumption and profit that he sues the human race. But do you want to see cartoon courtrooms and cartoon lawyers? Or hauling music superstar Sting (playing his cartoon self) to the stand to explain a stage name stolen from "bee culture"? It might sound funny, but it doesn't play all that funny.

Barry wins his case over a stereotypical Southern lawyer (John Goodman, playing it very broadly) so honey gets yanked from shelves, bees lose their honeymaking jobs, flowers don't get pollinated and all vegetation dies in Central Park, which in the Seinfeld world view means everywhere. So you get something you never saw on "Seinfeld" -- a moral lesson, in this case an ecological one.

Directors Simon J. Smith and Steve Hickner struggle to make bee bodies into a thing of comedy. About as far as they get are antenna becoming mobile phones and Barry's best buddy, Adam Flayman (Matthew Broderick), replacing his lost stinger with a plastic toothpick sword. Flights through the park and canyons of Manhattan's high rises add a bit of zip. Barry also gets stuck to a tennis ball that is then volleyed back and forth. But throughout you sense the strain to get any comic action going.

Barry violates the bee code of behavior when he speaks to a florist named Vanessa (Renee Zellweger). They then become fast friends, she encouraging his lawsuit and he courts her like a suitor and thereby upsetting her beefcake-but-no-brains boyfriend Ken (an amusing Patrick Warburton). But unlike the rat and rookie chef in "Ratatouille", there is no inherent logic to this relationship. One can't do anything for the other. Everything instead rests on the dialogue between them and the self-evident absurdity of bees and humans conversing. It probably would play better on "A Prairie Home Companion".

Among the voice actors, Chris Rock fares best in, interestingly, a very short appearance as a fast-talking mosquito. Kathy Bates and director Barry Levinson have fun with Barry's stick-to-honey parents, while Larry King nicely kids himself as a Bee Larry King.

BEE MOVIE

Paramount

DreamWorks Animation SKG in association with Columbus 81 Prods.

Credits:

Directors: Simon J. Smith, Steve Hickner

Screenwriters: Jerry Seinfeld, Spike Feresten, Barry Marder, Andy Robin

Producers: Jerry Seinfeld, Christina Steinberg

Production designer: Alex McDowell

Visual effects supervisor: Doug Cooper

Music: Rupert Gregson-Williams

Executive music producer: Hans Zimmer

Art director/character designer: Christophe Lautrette

Editor: Nick Fletcher

Cast:

Barry B. Benson: Jerry Seinfeld

Vanessa Bloome: Renee Zellweger

Adam Flayman: Matthew Broderick

Ken: Patrick Warburton

Layton T. Montgomery: John Goodman

Mooseblood: Chris Rock

Janet Benson: Kathy Bates

Martin Benson: Barry Levinson

Running time -- 90 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

Bee Movie

Bee Movie
Cartoonists have thoroughly explored the animal kingdom, giving anthropomorphic vigor to mice, dogs, cats, birds, donkeys, fish, pigs, bugs, dinosaurs, roadrunners, coyotes and even one big green ogre. Now it's the bees' turn in DreamWorks Animation's Bee Movie.

Unfortunately, bees just aren't that funny. They talk funny now and then thanks to that force of comedy, Jerry Seinfeld, who co-wrote, co-produced and stars in his first animated feature. But they aren't intriguing cartoon creatures. Nor is the odd story Seinfeld and his collaborators dreamed up very inspired. The film labors too hard for its comic moments and never discovers a cartoon logic that will allow bees and humans to interact.

When Bee Movie opens, honey will equal money for the first week, but repeat business, so vital for animated films, is not likely to be heavy. Seinfeld's considerable and loyal following certainly will help.

Seinfeld's extraordinary humor, which propelled one of TV's most successful comedy series for nine years, is wildly cerebral and serendipitous. It's geared for making mountains out of molehills and exploring the minutia of life in all its frustrating, explosively funny glory.

And nothing could be more cerebral about the idea of a bumble bee named Barry (voiced by Seinfeld) getting so outraged that humans are "stealing" honey for consumption and profit that he sues the human race. But do you want to see cartoon courtrooms and cartoon lawyers? Or hauling music superstar Sting (playing his cartoon self) to the stand to explain a stage name stolen from "bee culture?" It might sound funny, but it doesn't play all that funny.

Barry wins his case over a stereotypical Southern lawyer (John Goodman, playing it very broadly) so honey gets yanked from shelves, bees lose their honeymaking jobs, flowers don't get pollinated and all vegetation dies in Central Park, which in the Seinfeld world view means everywhere. So you get something you never saw on Seinfeld -- a moral lesson, in this case an ecological one.

Directors Simon J. Smith and Steve Hickner struggle to make bee bodies into a thing of comedy. About as far as they get are antenna becoming mobile phones and Barry's best buddy, Adam Flayman (Matthew Broderick), replacing his lost stinger with a plastic toothpick sword. Flights through the park and canyons of Manhattan's high rises add a bit of zip. Barry also gets stuck to a tennis ball that is then volleyed back and forth. But throughout you sense the strain to get any comic action going.

Barry violates the bee code of behavior when he speaks to a florist named Vanessa (Renee Zellweger). They then become fast friends, she encouraging his lawsuit and he courts her like a suitor and thereby upsetting her beefcake-but-no-brains boyfriend Ken (an amusing Patrick Warburton). But unlike the rat and rookie chef in Ratatouille, there is no inherent logic to this relationship. One can't do anything for the other. Everything instead rests on the dialogue between them and the self-evident absurdity of bees and humans conversing. It probably would play better on A Prairie Home Companion.

Among the voice actors, Chris Rock fares best in, interestingly, a very short appearance as a fast-talking mosquito. Kathy Bates and director Barry Levinson have fun with Barry's stick-to-honey parents, while Larry King nicely kids himself as a Bee Larry King.

BEE MOVIE

Paramount

DreamWorks Animation SKG in association with Columbus 81 Prods.

Credits:

Directors: Simon J. Smith, Steve Hickner

Screenwriters: Jerry Seinfeld, Spike Feresten, Barry Marder, Andy Robin

Producers: Jerry Seinfeld, Christina Steinberg

Production designer: Alex McDowell

Visual effects supervisor: Doug Cooper

Music: Rupert Gregson-Williams

Executive music producer: Hans Zimmer

Art director/character designer: Christophe Lautrette

Editor: Nick Fletcher

Cast:

Barry B. Benson: Jerry Seinfeld

Vanessa Bloome: Renee Zellweger

Adam Flayman: Matthew Broderick

Ken: Patrick Warburton

Layton T. Montgomery: John Goodman

Mooseblood: Chris Rock

Janet Benson: Kathy Bates

Martin Benson: Barry Levinson

Running time -- 90 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

See also

Credited With | External Sites