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My Top Ten Oscar® Submissions for Best Foreign Language Film includes darkest horse, from Slovakia…

My Top Ten Oscar® Submissions for Best Foreign Language Film includes darkest horse, from Slovakia…
My Top Ten Oscar® Submissions for Best Foreign Language Film includes darkest horse, from Slovakia, ‘The Line

You know how, when you finally see a movie you really love, all things seem possible? How a great movie transports you to a new reality? Without that experience, normal life seems drab and dreary unless you use other means of transcendance, like hope, art, music, dancing, religion or drugs.

Have I yet raved about any of the 25 foreign language submissions?

Yes, but it was a long time ago when it won the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, that I was so enamoured Hungarian director Ildikó Enyedi’s Of Body and Soul (as I was with her previous film, the 1989 Cannes Film Festival Camera d’or winner, My Twentieth Century, which was seen by about a .02% of the population). But that was way back in February.

I would put my body
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Matt Ross on the Resilience of ‘The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover’

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Matt Ross on the Resilience of ‘The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover’
When it premiered in 1989, Peter Greenaway’s “The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover” stunned audiences with its unflinching portraits of abuse and sexuality. It’s as dark as comedy can get, but it remains in the collective film consciousness through the generation of filmmakers that Greenaway influenced.

Read More: Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

One of them is Matt Ross, director of “Captain Fantastic,” who singled out film’s technical and storytelling mastery. In the latest of our “Movies That Inspire Me” series, presented in partnership with FilmStruck, Ross explains how the film’s single-set construct helps grip the audience from the story’s outset.

Ross also praised Gambon and Mirren’s central performances. Amidst the ugliness, Ross argues that Gambon’s ability to elicit a strange sense of empathy and Mirren’s strength
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: "Made" (1972) Starring Carol White And Ron Harper; UK Blu-ray Edition From Network Distributing

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

Director John Mackenzie's powerful and captivating 1972 kitchen sink drama Made has been given the opportunity to find a new audience via a tasty UK Blu-Ray release from Network Distributing.

Valerie Marshall (Carol White) is a single mother eking out a meagre living as a London telephone exchange operator whilst simultaneously caring for her multiple-sclerosis-stricken mother (Margery Mason). Seemingly destined never to find true happiness and weary of the inapposite attentions of would-be suitors, Valerie agrees to assist priest and family friend Father Dyson (John Castle) in chaperoning a bunch of underprivileged youths on a day trip to the seaside. There she meets folk singer Mike Preston (Roy Harper), whose outwardly relaxed approach to life just might pave her way to salvation.

A slightly ponderous and largely dispiriting snapshot of early 1970s lower class Britain, I'll openly confess that when I first saw Made I was convinced it would leave me cold.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Long Good Friday/Mona Lisa review – captivating visions of London’s underworld

(John Mackenzie, 1980/Neil Jordan, 1986; Arrow DVD/Blu-ray, 18)

Bob Hoskins became an actor by accident when he accompanied a friend to an audition at London’s leftwing Unity theatre in 1969, and achieved TV stardom as the doomed travelling salesman in Dennis Potter’s Pennies From Heaven. In 1980, he became an international star in Scottish director John Mackenzie’s The Long Good Friday, his first major screen role, as the East End gangster Harold Shand who dreams of transforming his minor criminal empire into a legitimate enterprise by rejuvenating London’s decaying docklands and playing host to the 1988 Olympics. Hoskins’s Shand was compared favourably with Edward G Robinson’s seminal Little Caesar of 1931.

Related: Bob Hoskins: a career in pictures

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Scott Reviews John Mackenzie’s The Long Good Friday [Arrow Films Blu-ray Review]

Throughout the supplements on Arrow’s new (rather impressive) Blu-ray edition of this landmark gangster film, nearly everyone involved speaks of their collective desire to simply make the best film they possibly could, and in many ways, The Long Good Friday is just about the most natural result of that pursuit. Nothing goes unaccounted for, the characters are all richly drawn, the narrative drive is forceful without overwhelming a chance for reflection, and there’s just enough of a mystery to the whole thing to keep the audience hooked. The satisfaction that can come from such a well-rounded, expertly-delivered film can sometimes, however, be diminished by the sheer contentedness of the thing. Life is unwieldy, unpredictable, and sometimes incomprehensible, and films that ignore those qualities in the pursuit of “perfection” can feel closed-off.

Indeed, most of The Long Good Friday follows this tendency – Harold Shand’s (Bob Hoskins) is a
See full article at CriterionCast »

Daily | Goings On | Reed, Klein, De Sica

With Carol Reed's The Third Man (1949) now screening in New York, London and other cities, the Independent has posted Martin Scorsese's thoughts on the classic—and on Reed, "a wonderful film artist." At Hyperallergic, John Yau writes about collages by John Ashbery and Guy Maddin. Curator Ed Halter considers the films of William Klein. Calum Marsh previews the Vittorio De Sica retrospective in Toronto. This week, London's Close-Up will re-open with a series of six films by John Cassavetes. And in the London Review of Books, Michael Wood writes about Bob Hoskins in John Mackenzie's The Long Good Friday. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

First the gangsters, then the bankers: how The Long Good Friday foretold the future

The classic thriller predicted the rise of Thatcherism and the transformation of London’s Docklands into an area of unbridled commerce. For the re-release of the film, I revisited the streets where mobsters once ran wild

At the start of The Long Good Friday, Harold Shand flew in on Concorde. Shand was old-school: a London ganglord played by Bob Hoskins, back home after a New York business trip to find his empire being gutted.

Now, to revisit Harold’s world, I’m listening to the driverless hum of the Docklands Light Railway (Dlr), gently jolting through east London above the endless juliet balconies of new-build flats. Neither the Dlr nor the flats were here in June 1979, when Hoskins and director John Mackenzie started work on a modestly scaled British crime thriller that would become one of the most darkly momentous films that Britain ever made. So, on another sunlit early summer day,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Long Good Friday 35th Anniversary Blu Ray Review

Director: John Mackenzie

Cast: Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren

Certificate: 18

Running Time: 116 minutes

Last year we lost the brilliant Bob Hoskins to the void. The British actor known for Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Mermaids, Hook and Super Mario Bros was sadly lost to Pneumonia. Whilst better known for these big budget studio movies Hoskins is beloved by many in the UK for his turns in Mona Lisa and The Long Good Friday, and though he may be sorely missed both of these gems are getting the special edition treatment this year. We may still have a little while to wait for Mona Lisa but as of Monday 4th May you can own anniversary edition of The Long Good Friday.

This isn’t just an old film that has been stuffed onto a disc with a couple of trailers, oh no, Arrow Films have painstakingly overseen a fully film restoration and shifted
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘The Long Good Friday’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

Stars: Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren, P.H. Moriarty, Kevin McNally, Alan Ford, Dave King, Bryan Marshall, Derek Thompson, Eddie Constantine, Paul Freeman, Leo Dolan, Patti Love, Pierce Brosnan | Written by Barrie Keeffe | Directed by John Mackenzie

The gangster movie is a beast very like the gangs it is based on. Depending on the country of origin the crime organisations tend to have certain looks and style and a certain tradition that they cling to as their laws of how to do business. The modern gangster movies are definitely an example of this, but they also share one thing in common, they lend a lot from The Long Good Friday which gets the Arrow Video treatment with its new release on Blu-ray.

Harold (Bob Hoskins) is a British gangster with an eye to capitalism and being a successful business man. Seeing London as his empire he is taken aback at the incredulous
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review – The Long Good Friday (1980)

The Long Good Friday, 1980.

Directed by John Mackenzie.

Starring Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren, Dave King, Pierce Brosnan, Eddie Constantine, Paul Barber, Derek Thompson, Brian Hall, Alan Ford, Kevin McNally, P.H. Moriarty, Karl Howman, Bryan Marshall.

Synopsis:

A ruthless English gangster’s empire starts to fall after a series of bombings over the Easter weekend.

Britain has always made good gangster films but there was always an angle to them, a little something that the filmmakers honed in on so they offered slightly more than the ultra-violent mob movies coming out of America. But in 1980 The Long Good Friday arrived and gave British crime movies a new, for the UK anyway, edge; a gangster film that was actually about gangsters and what they do.

But despite the gritty nature of the script and the raw production values it was the central performance by a then relatively unknown Bob Hoskins as Harold
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive: Watch The Trailer For The 35th Anniversary Edition Of ‘The Long Good Friday’

One of my favourite films of all time has to be the fantastic 1980s London-set gangster film The Long Good Friday. The film, which starred the late Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren and Paul Freeman, still stands up today, 35 years on from its original, acclaimed release.

The epic gangster movie is getting a limited cinema re-release on the 19th June through Arrow Films, and below, we have an exclusive look at the theatrical trailer for the 35th Anniversary Edition, which has a high-quality 2k digital restoration.

Harold Shand (Bob Hoskins) is a businessman with great ambitions. Spotting the development potential of London’s derelict Docklands area years before the Thatcher government, he tries to broker a deal with his American counterpart (Eddie Constantine) that will make them both millions. But who is killing Harold’s other associates and blowing up his businesses – and why?

Universally regarded as one of the greatest British gangster films ever made,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Manakamana DVD Review

Directors: Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez

Running Time: 118 mins

Certificate: E

Special Features: Deleted Scenes, Trailers

At the end of gangster film The Long Good Friday, there’s a famous sequence where Bob Hoskins is captured in a close-up static shot as he sits in the back of a car. The character awaits a grisly fate at the hands of the Ira and over the course of a few minutes we see nothing but his expectant face. When Hoskins asked the director what he should be thinking, John Mackenzie suggested he try working out what was going on in the plot. An unusual way to begin this review perhaps but in my view pertinent, for documentary Manakamana adopts a similar approach to a completely different subject. The piece is composed of a series of locked-off shots depicting ten minute cable car trips over the Nepalese mountains by pilgrims on
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Re-Viewed: The Long Good Friday, Bob Hoskins's gangster masterpiece

Re-Viewed: The Long Good Friday, Bob Hoskins's gangster masterpiece
"The Mafia? I've shit 'em!"

Brutal. Compelling. Poignant. Prescient. Thrilling. All words synonymous with The Long Good Friday, John Mackenzie's masterpiece that propelled the late, great Bob Hoskins to film stardom in 1980 as the complex gangster Harold Shand. Its power to enthral and shock has not diminished in the intervening years, while its cultural value has soared as it provides a fascinating snapshot of a society in transition.

Charting the demise of Shand's empire as he seeks to turn himself into a legitimate businessman through a property deal with an American client, the film is laden with aesthetic articulations of violence that are horrendous yet gripping. This is epitomised by the gory sequence in which Shand's paranoia compels him to round up potential enemies and hang them upside down on meat hooks in an abattoir, complete with Pov shots from the captives to reinforce the chilling sense of horror.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

What Were Hoskins' Best Films and Performances?

Bob Hoskins dead at 71: Hoskins’ best movies included ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit,’ ‘Mona Lisa’ (photo: Bob Hoskins in ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ with Jessica Rabbit, voiced by Kathleen Turner) Bob Hoskins, who died at age 71 in London yesterday, April 29, 2014, from pneumonia (initially reported as “complications of Parkinson’s disease”), was featured in nearly 70 movies over the course of his four-decade film career. Hoskins was never a major box office draw — "I don’t think I’m the sort of material movie stars are made of — I’m five-foot-six-inches and cubic. My own mum wouldn’t call me pretty." Yet, this performer with attributes similar to those of Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, and Lon Chaney had the lead in one of the biggest hits of the late ’80s. In 1988, Robert Zemeckis’ groundbreaking Who Framed Roger Rabbit, which seamlessly blended animated and live action footage, starred Hoskins as gumshoe Eddie Valiant,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'The Long Good Friday': The late Bob Hoskins' best performance

'The Long Good Friday': The late Bob Hoskins' best performance
The Long Good Friday is not the most successful film to star Bob Hoskins, who has died at the age of 71. (That would be the 1988 blockbuster Who Framed Roger Rabbit.) It may not even be the British actor’s best gangster movie; a case can be made for Neil Jordan’s superlative Mona Lisa. But as a reminder of Hoskins’ volcanic, yet subtly-applied talents, it is impossible to beat this 1979 thriller from director John Mackenzie.

Hoskins plays Harold Shand, a gangster whose (hugely prescient) plan to become a legitimate businessman — by developing the docklands area of East London — is repeatedly,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

R.I.P. Bob Hoskins (1942-2014)

Two years ago, Bob Hoskins made the announcement that due to a diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease, he would be retiring from acting. It gave us a chance to reflect on his 5 Best Performances, and those will certainly be treasured ever more, with Hoskins sadly passing away today at the age of 71, after battling pneumonia. Hoskins was probably not the most obvious face for the stage or screen, but that was also what made him a distinctive and well-regarded actor. Fueled by passion for the profession, he started with small roles in the theatre and on television, and finally got a break in the 1978 mini-series "Pennies From Heaven," kicking open the door to some of his most iconic roles. The 1980s saw Hoskins establish himself as one of the finest of his generation thanks to terrific turns in John Mackenzie's "The Long Good Friday," Neil Jordan's "Mona Lisa" (for
See full article at The Playlist »

Dame Helen Mirren To Receive BAFTA Fellowship

Dame Helen Mirren has been one of the best of our glorious British actors over the years, and so we’re very pleased to hear that BAFTA will be presenting her with the Fellowship at the Ee British Academy Film Awards ceremony at the Royal Opera House, London on February 16th.

Mirren’s career began with roles in films such as Michael Powell’s Age Of Consent and O Lucky Man! However her breakthrough role came in John Mackenzie’s brilliant The Long Good Friday. She then continued to take on roles throughout the 80s including Excalibur and The Madness Of King George, for which her performance was both BAFTA and Oscar-nominated. Helen Mirren is also the only actor to have taken on the role of both Queen Elizabeth I and II on the screen, and it was her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II in the 2006 film The Queen that
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Dame Helen Mirren To Be Honored With BAFTA Fellowship

Helen Mirren

On Sunday February 16, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) will present Dame Helen Mirren with the Academy Fellowship at the Ee British Academy Film Awards ceremony at the Royal Opera House, London.

Awarded annually, the Fellowship is the highest accolade bestowed by the Academy upon an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Fellows previously honoured for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee and Martin Scorsese. Sir Alan Parker received the Fellowship at last year’s Film Awards.

John Willis, Chairman of BAFTA, said: “Dame Helen Mirren receives the Fellowship as one of the most outstanding actresses of her generation. Dame Helen’s incredibly successful career is testament to the determination, dedication and skill she brings to each of her roles.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

BAFTA to Present Helen Mirren with Fellowship

BAFTA to Present Helen Mirren with Fellowship
London — The British Academy of Film and Television Arts will present Helen Mirren with its highest honor, the Fellowship, at the Ee British Academy Film Awards ceremony at the Royal Opera House, London on Feb. 16.

Awarded annually, the Fellowship is the highest accolade bestowed by BAFTA on an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Fellows previously honored for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee and Martin Scorsese. Alan Parker received the Fellowship at last year’s film awards.

John Willis, chairman of BAFTA, said: “Dame Helen Mirren receives the Fellowship as one of the most outstanding actresses of her generation. Dame Helen’s incredibly successful career is testament to the determination, dedication and skill she brings to each of her roles.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

BAFTA to honour Dame Helen Mirren

  • ScreenDaily
BAFTA to honour Dame Helen Mirren
The Queen actress to receive highest accolade awarded by the British Academy.

BAFTA is to present Dame Helen Mirren with the Fellowship at the Ee British Academy Film Awards ceremony in London on Feb 16.

Awarded annually, the Fellowship is the highest accolade bestowed by the Academy upon an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Fellows previously honoured for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee and Martin Scorsese.

Sir Alan Parker received the Fellowship at last year’s Film Awards.

John Willis, chairman of BAFTA, said: “Dame Helen Mirren receives the Fellowship as one of the most outstanding actresses of her generation. Dame Helen’s incredibly successful career is testament to the determination, dedication and skill she brings to each of her roles.”

Dame Helen commented:
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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