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15 items from 2016


Road House (1948)

15 August 2016 3:48 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The character setup in this classy noir potboiler couldn't be better, with Ida Lupino a sensation as the mountain lodge chanteuse who knows her way around men. For its first two acts the show is all but perfect. Road House Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / Street Date September 13, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Ida Lupino, Cornel Wilde, Celeste Holm, Richard Widmark, O.Z. Whitehead, Robert Karnes, George Beranger, Ian MacDonald, Ray Teal. Cinematography Joseph Lashelle Film Editor James B. Clark Original Music Cyril J. Mokridge Written by Edward Chodorov, Margaret Gruen, Oscar Saul Produced by Edward Chodorov Directed by Jean Negulesco

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

For the first two-thirds of Jean Negulesco's Road House I thought I was seeing one of the best films noirs of the late 1940s, and even when it sagged at the end it came up with a pretty good score. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Daily | Marker, Ray, Rohmer

7 August 2016 7:48 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Today's round of news and views opens with a review of Superior Viaduct's release of the audio track of Chris Marker’s La Jetée on vinyl. Plus: Essays on Nicholas Ray, Eric Rohmer and Alfred Hitchcock, Jean-Luc Godard's Pierrot le fou, Ida Lupino, Marguerite Duras, Stanley Kubrick, Tim Holt, a book on Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub, remembering the actual Big Lebowski, David Huddleston, interviews with Pedro Almodóvar, Kent Jones, Clint Eastwood, Steven Soderbergh, a trailer for the new restoration of Ken Loach's Kes—and more. » - David Hudson »

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Susan Seidelman Looks Back: How ‘Smithereens’ Defined Her Career – Girl Talk

28 July 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present and future.

Susan Seidelman had just completed her first feature when the Cannes Film Festival came calling. In 1982, Seidelman wasn’t yet 30; she was only a few years out of film school and had only a single feature under her belt. But that didn’t matter to the world’s most well-regarded festival. They wanted Seidelman’s “Smithereens,” and the ensuing reception for the film — a punk-infused dark comedy about the bohemian underworld of New York City featuring a not entirely likable lead character — didn’t just change Seidelman’s life; it changed the way American independent cinema was received around the world.

Smithereens,” shot guerilla-style around the city with a cast and crew made up of many of the filmmaker’s Nyu classmates, marked a sea change for Cannes: It was the first American independent feature had »

- Kate Erbland

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Marni Nixon, Famous Playback Singer For Movie Musical Actresses, Dies at 86

25 July 2016 10:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Marni Nixon, American soprano and playback singer for actresses in movie musicals, has died at the age of 86 of breast cancer. She is survived by two daughters from her first marriage, three sisters, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Read More: Damien Chazelle’s Ryan Gosling- and Emma Stone-Starring Awards Contender ‘La La Land’ Lands a Venice Premiere

Throughout the 1950s and ’60s, Nixon was the singing voice for stars in a variety of acclaimed Hollywood films. She dubbed Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story,” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady.” She also sang for Jeanne Crain in “Cheaper by the Dozen,” Janet Leigh in “Pepe,” and Ida Lupino in “Jennifer.” Her performances were frequently uncredited, but she was considered by the press to be “the ghostess with the mostest.” Though Nixon had to sign contracts that stipulated she wouldn’t »

- Vikram Murthi

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From Caged to Orange Is the New Black: A Brief History of Incarcerated Women on Screen

15 June 2016 11:10 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Orange Is the New Black returns June 17. The show has rightly earned praise for its nuanced, moving portrayals of female inmates of all stripes, and serves as a reminder of how far things have come in terms of images of incarcerated women on screen. In appreciation of series creator Jenji Kohan and the cast and crew's elevated take on the subject matter, we're looking back at the bleak and often exploitative history of the strange "women's prison drama" film genre. The portrayal of women in prison can be split - as most of Hollywood can - into two periods: Pre- and Post-Code. »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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From Caged to Orange Is the New Black: A Brief History of Incarcerated Women on Screen

15 June 2016 11:10 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Orange Is the New Black returns June 17. The show has rightly earned praise for its nuanced, moving portrayals of female inmates of all stripes, and serves as a reminder of how far things have come in terms of images of incarcerated women on screen. In appreciation of series creator Jenji Kohan and the cast and crew's elevated take on the subject matter, we're looking back at the bleak and often exploitative history of the strange "women's prison drama" film genre. The portrayal of women in prison can be split - as most of Hollywood can - into two periods: Pre- and Post-Code. »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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NYC Weekend Watch: Brian De Palma, Hong Sang-soo, Thom Andersen & More

3 June 2016 5:55 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

A full-career Brian De Palma retrospective is now underway. Sisters and Carrie play on Friday, and Saturday brings The Phantom of the Paradise — but that’s not even half of the first weekend.

Prints of Gilda, Space Jam, and shorts by Charles and Ray Eames screen this Saturday.

Museum of the Moving Image

Discover the »

- Nick Newman

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Film Review: ‘Women Who Run Hollywood’

29 May 2016 2:06 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The documentary film “Women Who Run Hollywood” from sister filmmaking team Clara and Julia Kuperberg (“This Is Orson Welles,” “John Ford and Monument Valley”) is only 52 minutes long. That is perhaps as eloquent a comment as this rather cursory Cannes Classics title makes about its hot topic — just try to imagine how many hundreds of hours a male-focused counterpart film would run to. But despite evident good intentions, and some excellent interviewees, it is a frustrating effort in many ways, not least of which is its slightly misleading title, which suggests a more contemporary than historical slant. Its more evocative French title translates as “And Women Created Hollywood,” riffing on Roger Vadim’s majestic 1958 monument to paternalistic sexism “And God Created Woman.” It would have been a more accurate and enticing choice.

Following a tried-and-true if largely uninspired format of talking heads and archive footage, “Women Who Run Hollywood” does »

- Jessica Kiang

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Ten Things I Learned At The 2016 TCM Classic Film Festival

7 May 2016 1:12 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Well, another year spent in the company of classic cinema curated by the TCM Classic Film Festival has come and gone, leaving me with several great experiences watching favorite films and ones I’d never before seen, some already cherished memories, and the usual weary bag of bones for a body in the aftermath. (I usually come down with something when I decompress post-festival and get back to the working week, and this year has been no exception.) There have now been seven TCMFFs since its inaugural run in 2010. I’ve been lucky enough to attend them all, and this time around I saw more movies than I ever have before—18 features zipping from auditorium to queue and back to auditorium like a gerbil in a tube maze. In order to make sure I got in to see everything I wanted to see, I had to make sure I was »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Staring Down The 2016 TCM Classic Film Festival

24 April 2016 10:22 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

I live in Los Angeles, and my residency here means that a lot of great film programming-- revival screenings, advance looks at upcoming releases and vital, fascinating glimpses at unheralded, unexpected cinema from around the world—is available to me on a week-by-week basis. But I’ve never been to Cannes. Toronto, Tribeca, New York, Venice, Berlin, Sundance, SXSW, these festivals are all events that I have yet to be lucky enough to attend, and I can reasonably expect that it’s probably going to stay that way for the foreseeable future. I never attended a film festival of any kind until I made my way to the outskirts of the Mojave Desert for the  Lone Pine Film Festival in 2006, which was its own kind of grand adventure, even if it wasn’t exactly one for bumping shoulders with critics, stars and fanatics on the French Riviera.

But since 2010 there »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Mike Gold: Imitation Is The Sincerest Form of Thievery

6 April 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

The 1950s were a time of great experimentation for comic book publishers. Retail outlets were disappearing and post-war military scale-backs undermined Px sales. Superman was kept alive by its massive television exposure, but virtually all other superhero comics were either gone or in deep trouble.

Necessity being the mother of invention, comics publishers back then had no choice but to try new ideas and concepts. Western comics were hit-or-miss; those that featured top-line movie stars or characters were doing okay, the others were sort of meh. Romance comics, teevee tie-ins and some funny animal books were selling. The horror and crime comics that had been keeping publishers such as EC, Harvey and Gleason in the money were being condemned by the media, camera-hungry politicians and sanctimonious self-appointed “experts.”

So until DC and Marvel finally succeeded in rejuvenating the superhero genre, experimentation was the watchword of that decade. And that brings »

- Mike Gold

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Hitch Hike | Blu-ray Review

15 March 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Raro Video resurrects an exploitation goodie masquerading as another bit of cheap Eurosleaze, Hitch Hike (aka Autostop Rosso Sangue) a 1977 thriller from Italian director Pasquale Festa Campanile. Like a tawdry version of an early Polanski effort, it’s a significant anomaly of its ilk for several reasons, the most notable being its director, usually known as a fixture of 1970’s Italian-style comedy (aka commedia all’italiana). Adapted from the novel The Violence and the Fury by Peter Kern, it’s headlined by Franco Nero, French actress Corinne Clery (the title character from infamous The Story of O, 1975) and grindhouse staple David Hess (The Last House on the Left, 1972), while predictable story elements spiked with moments of brutal violence should be enough to rejuvenate interest in a title not often screened in the Us (despite its initial box office success in Europe).

Walter Mancini (Franco Nero), a bitter, alcoholic journalist, is »

- Nicholas Bell

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Weekly Rushes. 9 March 2016

9 March 2016 8:36 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSThe Academy of the MusesThe announcement for what films have been selected for the Cannes Film Festival won't come for more than a month, but early speculation is rife. Critic Neil Young not only has a prediction of what'll be in this year's festival, but also the odds on which of those films will win the coveted Palm d'Or. Currently in the lead? Argentine director Lucrecia Martel's long-awaited Zama.For those lucky enough to be able to afford to live in London (or travel to it), the Tate Modern will host A Night with Apichatpong Weerasethakul, a 14-hour event with the director in person featuring "ghosts, dreams, stillness and sleep." We'll certainly dream of attending.The latest issue of Film Comment is on newsstands, and some of it has been posted online, »

- Notebook

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A Telling Look Back at the Century-Old Quest for Diversity in Entertainment

23 February 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When Variety began, the entertainment industry was mostly live theater, circuses and vaudeville — and minstrel shows. Later, blacks were at the forefront in demanding equality in the entertainment industry and were followed by groups representing Latinos, Asians, Native Americans and women.

For better or worse, showbiz has always been a microcosm of the world. While black stars like Louis Armstrong were celebrated for their art, they were still denied access to hotels, drinking fountains and restaurants.

Many minorities were (and are) victimized by institutionalized prejudice. If anyone doubts that, it only requires a quick look at Variety’s 111 years of publication to find the proof.

The history of show business is a history of bias, which can be broken down into three general eras: Humiliation (1905-42) when grossly demeaning terms like “coon” and vile treatment were “normal”; protest (1942-49), when voices were raised in simple requests that demeaning stereotypes and »

- Steven Gaydos and Tim Gray

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Oscars Still Have Long Way to Go On Gender Equality

8 February 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ever since Oscar nominations were announced Jan. 14, there has been a lot of talk about diversity — but most of it has centered on racial disparity. However, there is one group that’s not a minority, but still under-represented in the film world: women, who are half the population, but represent a small fraction of workers in the film industry. The latter fact is reflected in this year’s Oscar nominations, where women were not invisible, but their presence is still insufficient.

Here’s the good news. In costume design, four of the five nominees are women. Women represented exactly 50% of the nominees in makeup/hairstyling (four of eight individuals cited) and editing (three of the six).

From there, things get a little rockier.

Among production designers, it’s four women out of 11 nominees. In adapted screenplay, women represent two of the six nominated individuals; in original screenplay, it’s two »

- Tim Gray

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

15 items from 2016


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