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Tobe Hooper Remembered: The Horror World Pays Tribute to a Trailblazer

Tobe Hooper Remembered: The Horror World Pays Tribute to a Trailblazer
Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Poltergeist director Tobe Hooper passed away yesterday at the age of 74 and now members of the Hollywood and horror community are paying tribute to the iconic director. Those paying tribute to Hooper have included Baby Driver and Shaun of the Dead director Edgar Wright and Sleepwalkers director, Mick Garris, who collaborated with Hooper on Showtime's Masters of Horror show as well as Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn. 2017 has been a sad year for horror fans with the passing of Hooper and another horror director George A. Romero.

Hooper was born in Austin, Texas, the son of Lois Belle and Norman William Ray Hooper, who owned a theater in San Angelo. He first became interested in filmmaking when he used his father's 8 mm camera at age 9. Hooper eventually took Radio-Television-Film classes at the University of Texas at Austin and studied drama in Dallas under Baruch Lumet
See full article at MovieWeb »

By Sidney Lumet

A lengthy talk-fest interview of the underrated filmmaker, who takes us through his life story as a personal journey, not a string of movie assignments. Sidney Lumet seems to attract a lot of criticism, and so did this docu for not challenging his opinions or rubbing his nose in his less admirable movie efforts. The docu is just Lumet’s thoughts, and the words of a man of integrity are always inspiring.

By Sidney Lumet

Blu-ray

FilmRise

2015 / Color /1:78 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date January 9, 2017 / 24.95

Starring Sidney Lumet

Cinematography Tom Hurwitz

Film Editor Anthony Ripoli

Produced by Scott Berrie, Nancy Buirski, Chris Donnelly, Joshua A. Green, Thane Rosenbaum, Robin Yigit Smith

Directed by Nancy Buirski

This ought to be a good year for documentary filmmaker Nancy Buirski. I first caught up with her excellent feature docu Afternoon of a Faun, about the ill-fated ballerina Tanaquil Le Clerc, and she’s had other successes as well.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Catalog From The Beyond: The Killer Shrews (1959)

  • DailyDead
Ah, the carefree days of 1950s America. Suburban families had the white picket fence in the yard, the 2.3 kids in the living room, and the persistent anxiety of dying in a blast of radioactive flame. The Cold War had eyes tilted skyward in anticipation of the day the Kremlin decided to drop the big one on the Us. And while there were “plans” in place (duck and cover, kids!) most people knew that there really wasn’t a whole lot they could do if a fifty-megaton warhead came to town.

As is often the case, the horror genre reflected this anxiety through the metaphor of scientists who, instead of creating giant weapons, created giant creatures. We had enormous lizards, gargantuan spiders, and even humongous blobs of unidentified slime. By 1959, if there was something that could have been made huge, it had likely been made huge. Enter Ray Kellogg, a former
See full article at DailyDead »

Forgotten B&W Horror Movies #9: The Killer Shrews

Movies from the “golden age” of black and white films (approximately the 1930’s through the 1950’s) almost invariably contain well-written dialogue and strikingly subtle humor, making them a favorite among many fans of cinema. The horror movies of this more subtle period in film history are therefore of a cerebral nature, primarily relying on the viewer’s imagination to generate the true sense of horror that modern movies generate through more visual means. It is these oft-ignored horror movies that will be the focus of a series of articles detailing the reasons why true fans of horror movies should rediscover these films.

I am finally back (after too long of a hiatus due to some personal business) with this 9th article in the Forgotten B&W Horror series. With this installment, we continue to look at a few movies that blur the line between horror and science fiction – a blurring
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Sidney Lumet, 1924 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Sidney Lumet, a director who preferred the streets of New York to the back lots of Hollywood and whose stories of conscience — 12 Angry Men, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, The Verdict, Network — became modern American film classics, died Saturday morning at his home in Manhattan. He was 86." Robert Berkvist in the New York Times: "'While the goal of all movies is to entertain,' Mr Lumet once wrote, 'the kind of film in which I believe goes one step further. It compels the spectator to examine one facet or another of his own conscience. It stimulates thought and sets the mental juices flowing.' Social issues set his own mental juices flowing, and his best films not only probed the consequences of prejudice, corruption and betrayal but also celebrated individual acts of courage."

"Nearly all the characters in Lumet's gallery are driven by obsessions or passions that range from the pursuit of justice,
See full article at MUBI »

Sidney Lumet obituary

Prolific film director with a reputation for exploring social and moral issues

Sidney Lumet, who has died aged 86, achieved critical and commercial success with his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which established his credentials as a liberal director who was sympathetic to actors, loved words and worked quickly. For the bulk of his career, he averaged a film a year, earning four Oscar nominations along the way for best director, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982).

It is arguable that, had he not been so prolific, Lumet's critical reputation would have been greater. Certainly, for every worthwhile film there was a dud, and occasionally a disaster, to match it. But Lumet loved to direct and he was greatly esteemed by the many actors – notably Al Pacino and Sean Connery – with whom he established a lasting rapport.

The majority of his films were shot not in Hollywood, but in and around New York.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sidney Lumet obituary

Prolific film director with a reputation for exploring social and moral issues

Sidney Lumet, who has died aged 86, achieved critical and commercial success with his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which established his credentials as a liberal director who was sympathetic to actors, loved words and worked quickly. For the bulk of his career, he averaged a film a year, earning four Oscar nominations along the way for best director, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982).

It is arguable that, had he not been so prolific, Lumet's critical reputation would have been greater. Certainly, for every worthwhile film there was a dud, and occasionally a disaster, to match it. But Lumet loved to direct and he was greatly esteemed by the many actors – notably Al Pacino and Sean Connery – with whom he established a lasting rapport.

The majority of his films were shot not in Hollywood, but in and around New York.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86

  • WENN
Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86
Legendary director Sidney Lumet has died at the age of 86.

The critically-acclaimed filmmaker passed away on Saturday morning at his New York home after a battle with lymphoma.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to actor/director Baruch Lumet and dancer Eugenia, he began his career as a child actor, appearing in a number of Broadway plays, including 1935's Dead End and The Eternal Road.

He made his movie debut at the age of 11, in Yiddish short film Papirossen, but halted his acting dreams to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Upon his return, he became involved in Off-Broadway productions as a director, before turning his attentions to TV in the 1950s.

Lumet's extensive small screen credits include hit series Danger, Mama and You Are There, which starred a young Walter Cronkite.

But it was his movie work which really grabbed critics' attention - his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), featured Henry Fonda as a courageous court juror who manages to convince the panel the defendant on trial for murder is innocent.

Social issues and the topic of morality were key to Lumet's work and he is perhaps best known for 1976 satire Network. The movie, starring William Holden, Peter Finch and Faye Dunaway, garnered a whopping 10 Oscar nominations, including honours for Best Film and Best Director. Network was awarded gold in four categories, with Finch taking Best Actor and Dunaway Best Actress.

He also directed 1962 drama A View From the Bridge, based on the play by Arthur Miller, and Long Day's Journey Into Night, which earned Katharine Hepburn an Oscar nod.

Lumet's other works included Agatha Christie crime classic Murder on the Orient Express in 1974, and he created a fantasy version of his beloved New York for his 1978 musical The Wiz, starring Michael Jackson and Diana Ross. The picture, a take on The Wizard of Oz, was a departure from Lumet's cutting-edge style of filmmaking and was a critical and commercial flop.

His films received a total of 40 Academy Award nominations throughout his career, and his leading stars included Marlon Brando, Paul Newman and Christopher Reeve.

Lumet was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 2005.

He is survived by his fourth wife, Mary Gimbel, two daughters, nine grandchildren, and a great grandson.

Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86

  • WENN
Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86
Legendary director Sidney Lumet has died at the age of 86.

The critically-acclaimed filmmaker passed away on Saturday morning at his New York home after a battle with lymphoma.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to actor/director Baruch Lumet and dancer Eugenia, he began his career as a child actor, appearing in a number of Broadway plays, including 1935's Dead End and The Eternal Road.

He made his movie debut at the age of 11, in Yiddish short film Papirossen, but halted his acting dreams to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Upon his return, he became involved in Off-Broadway productions as a director, before turning his attentions to TV in the 1950s.

Lumet's extensive small screen credits include hit series Danger, Mama and You Are There, which starred a young Walter Cronkite.

But it was his movie work which really grabbed critics' attention - his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), featured Henry Fonda as a courageous court juror who manages to convince the panel the defendant on trial for murder is innocent.

Social issues and the topic of morality were key to Lumet's work and he is perhaps best known for 1976 satire Network. The movie, starring William Holden, Peter Finch and Faye Dunaway, garnered a whopping 10 Oscar nominations, including honours for Best Film and Best Director. Network was awarded gold in four categories, with Finch taking Best Actor and Dunaway Best Actress.

He also directed 1962 drama A View From the Bridge, based on the play by Arthur Miller, and Long Day's Journey Into Night, which earned Katharine Hepburn an Oscar nod.

Lumet's other works included Agatha Christie crime classic Murder on the Orient Express in 1974, and he created a fantasy version of his beloved New York for his 1978 musical The Wiz, starring Michael Jackson and Diana Ross. The picture, a take on The Wizard of Oz, was a departure from Lumet's cutting-edge style of filmmaking and was a critical and commercial flop.

His films received a total of 40 Academy Award nominations throughout his career, and his leading stars included Marlon Brando, Paul Newman and Christopher Reeve.

Lumet was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 2005.

He is survived by his fourth wife, Mary Gimbel, two daughters, nine grandchildren, and a great grandson.

Remembering Sidney Lumet

Sidney Lumet died aged 86 on today in his residence in Manhattan, New York, from lymphoma.

Lumet was an Oscar-nominated director, known for films such as for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon, Network and The Verdict.

He was born on June 25, 1924, in Philadelphia, to parents Baruch Lumet and Eugenia Wermus, both veteran players of the Yiddish stage. He studied theater acting at the Professional Children’s School of New York and Columbia University. By the time he was 4, Lumet was appearing onstage with his father, and by the age of five he made his stage debut at the Yiddish Art Theatre. He made his Broadway debut in 1935, and appeared in several Broadway shows until World War II broke out in 1939.

After serving three years in the U.S army as a radar repairman stationed, Lumet returned to New York and formed his own theater workshop. He then transitioned from theater to
See full article at The Film Stage »

Sidney Lumet Passes Away at 86

One of the quintessential American filmmakers of the 20th century, Sidney Lumet passed away earlier this morning at his home in Manhattan, at age 86. His stepdaughter, Leslie Gimbel, attributed his death to complications arising from lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes).

Born in Philadelphia on June 25th, 1924, to actor Baruch Lumet and dancer Eugenia Wemus Lumet, Sidney Lumet actually began performing on Broadway as a kid during the 1930s and made his film acting debut at age 15 in … One Third of a Nation…

Lumet would go on to become a successful television director during the 1950s, helming multiple episodes of shows like Danger, You Are There, The Best of Broadway, and The Alcoa Hour. He made his feature-length film directorial debut in 1957 with Twelve Angry Men, a multiple Oscar-nominee that the American Film Institute (AFI) ranks as ...

Click to continue reading Sidney Lumet Passes Away at 86
See full article at Screen Rant »

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