Emmanuel Lubezki - News Poster

News

Roger Deakins’ Legacy is Bigger Than an Oscar: A Frank Conversation With the Cinematography Legend

Roger Deakins’ Legacy is Bigger Than an Oscar: A Frank Conversation With the Cinematography Legend
The Roger talk started in July, when the “Blade Runner 2049” trailer dropped three months before the film’s release. From just two minutes of footage, it was clear that Denis Villeneuve’s reimagining of the Ridley Scott’s visionary world 32 years into the future could finally provide a sufficiently stunning showcase for the“naturalistic” cinematographer.

But during the long awards season, another narrative came into play. Deakins’ recognition may be long overdue after 14 nominations, but there was also an entire gender that had been previously overlooked. This was the year that Rachel Morrison’s stunning work on “Mudbound” received the first-ever Oscar nomination for a female cinematographer.

The result is a front-page level of attention for a below-the-line category. Deakins like to preach that DPs should go unnoticed, but that’s not to be this year. “I’m really happy working on this film ‘The Goldfinch’ right now,” joked
See full article at Indiewire »

Roger Deakins wins Asc Award for “Blade Runner 2049”

Roger Deakins, Asc, Bsc claimed the coveted Theatrical Award for best cinematography in a motion picture for his work on “Blade Runner 2049” at the 32nd Annual American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Mart Taniel, Esc was given the Spotlight Award for “November.” In the TV categories, winners included Adriano Goldman, Asc, ABC for “The Crown;” Boris Mojsovski, Csc for “12 Monkeys;” and Mathias Herndl, Aac for “Genius.” The awards ceremony took place tonight in the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The complete list of winners and nominees follows: Theatrical Release Category (presented by Emmanuel Lubezki, Asc, AMC and Matthew Libatique, Asc) Roger Deakins, Asc, Bsc for “Blade Runner 2049” – Winner Bruno Delbonnel, Asc, Afc for “Darkest Hour” Hoyte van Hoytema, Asc, Fsf, Nsc for “DunkirkDan Laustsen, Asc, Dff for “The Shape of WaterRachel Morrison, Asc for “Mudbound” Spotlight Award Category (presented by John Bailey,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

2018 American Society of Cinematographers Awards: Even if Roger Deakins wins, his first Oscar is not in the bag

2018 American Society of Cinematographers Awards: Even if Roger Deakins wins, his first Oscar is not in the bag
Roger Deakins is predicted to win his fourth award from the American Society of Cinematographers on Feb. 17 for his lensing of “Blade Runner 2049.” And he is tipped to finally take home his first Oscar for this film after 13 losses. However, the track record of the guild at previewing the eventual choice of the academy is surprisingly poor.

The Asc winner has gone on to claim an Academy Awards bookend for Best Cinematography only 13 times in 31 years. Last year, “Lion” lenser Greig Fraser won with the Asc but lost the Oscar race to “La La Land’s” Linus Sandgren.
See full article at Gold Derby »

American Society of Cinematographers will continue love affair with Roger Deakins (‘Blade Runner 2049’), but will Oscars finally follow suit?

  • Gold Derby
On Febrruary 17 the American Society of Cinematographers will hand out prizes to the best lensers in film and television for the 32nd year. Roger Deakins is heavily favored to win for his work on the feature film “Blade Runner 2049,” but this wouldn’t be an overdue victory — far from it. Deakins has been awarded by the Asc 3 times before out of 14 previous nominations. However, he has never been able to translate that success to the Oscars, where he has lost all 13 of his previous bids. Will this finally be the year the motion picture academy makes it up to him?

Deakins won the Asc Award for “The Shawkshank Redemption” (1994), “The Man Who Wasn’t There” (2001) and “Skyfall” (2012). That makes him the guild’s third biggest winner behind Emmanuel Lubezki (five wins) and Conrad L. Hall (four wins). But while Lubezki and Hall also won three Oscars apiece, Deakins wasn
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTAs: Roger Deakins (‘Blade Runner 2049’) would tie Emmanuel Lubezki with four cinematography wins

2018 BAFTAs: Roger Deakins (‘Blade Runner 2049’) would tie Emmanuel Lubezki with four cinematography wins
Roger Deakins is still missing an Oscar from his resume, but he’s got plenty of BAFTA Awards — so many that if the “Blade Runner 2049” cinematographer prevails Sunday, he’ll join Emmanuel Lubezki with the second-most wins in the category at four behind Geoffrey Unsworth’s five.

In our latest predictions, Deakins has 8/15 odds to win over “Dunkirk” (3/1 odds), “The Shape of Water” (14/1 odds), “Darkest Hour” (66/1 odds) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (100/1 odds). An eight-time nominee, Deakins took home BAFTAs for lensing “The Man Who Wasn’t There” (2001), “No Country for Old Men” (2007) and “True Grit” (2010).

See ‘Blade Runner 2049’ could win Best Cinematography at the Oscars, but that Best Director snub really hurts

Deakins lost his most recent nomination, for 2015’s “Sicario,” to Lubezki — the first time the renowned cinematographers faced off at the BAFTAs — who won his third straight BAFTA for “The Revenant.” A previous winner
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tiffany Haddish Confirms She’s Speaking to Paul Thomas Anderson: ‘We’re Probably Going to Work Together’

Tiffany Haddish Confirms She’s Speaking to Paul Thomas Anderson: ‘We’re Probably Going to Work Together’
We’re getting closer to living in a world where Paul Thomas Anderson directs Tiffany Haddish. The director made headlines earlier this year while accepting the New York Film Critics Circle awards for Best Screenplay. Anderson was not in attendance, but he had his “Phantom Thread” star Lesley Manville read a note he wrote which directly addressed the “Girls Trip” breakout star.

Read More:Paul Thomas Anderson Admits He’s Most Proud of ‘The Master’ and Wants Emmanuel Lubezki to Shoot One of His Films

“I know everyone wants to work with you now,” Anderson wrote to Haddish, “but please, may I cut to the front of the line?”

Anderson proceeded to give out his actual phone number, which it turns out Haddish made sure to write down. The comedian has confirmed to Vulture that she has in fact called Anderson directly and now the two have spoken multiple times about a potential collaboration.
See full article at Indiewire »

Guillermo del Toro (‘Shape of Water’) may finally join his ‘Amigos’ Alfonso Cuaron & Alejandro G. Inarritu as an Oscar winner

Guillermo del Toro (‘Shape of Water’) may finally join his ‘Amigos’ Alfonso Cuaron & Alejandro G. Inarritu as an Oscar winner
Will Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”) finally join his filmmaking friends Alfonso Cuaron and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu in the pantheon of Oscar winners this year? If our odds are to be believed, he’s a strong front-runner to snag Best Picture, Best Director, and maybe even Best Original Screenplay for his romantic fantasy about a mute janitor (Sally Hawkins) in love with a fish man. And just think, it was a little more than a decade ago, in 2007, that the Three Amigos of Cinema, as they like to be known, were competing alongside each other for their 2006 films “Babel” (Inarritu), “Children of Men” (Cuaron) and “Pan’s Labyrinth” (del Toro). Two of them were first-time Oscar nominees that year. Now, by March 4, they could all be Oscar winners.

“There was a moment [in 2006] where we all felt like a historical weight,” del Toro recalled in our recent video interview
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Blade Runner 2049’ could win Best Cinematography at Oscars, but that Best Director snub really hurts

‘Blade Runner 2049’ could win Best Cinematography at Oscars, but that Best Director snub really hurts
A recent Oscar trend has emerged over the past five years, with the winners of Best Director and Best Cinematography going hand-in-hand. It started with “Life of Pi” winning both of those categories in 2013 for Ang Lee and Claudio Miranda, respectively. They were followed by director Alfonso Cuaron and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki winning for “Gravity” in 2014. Lubezki went on to win twice more consecutively for “Birdman” and “The Revenant” along with his director on both films, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. And just last year Damien Chazelle and Linus Sandgren both claimed their respective categories for “La La Land.” What does this trend mean for Roger Deakins (“Blade Runner 2049”), Gold Derby’s current cinematography frontrunner?

A victory for legendary director of photography Deakins would be going against recent history, as the film’s director Denis Villeneuve was snubbed. As of this writing, 14-time Oscar nominee Deakins is out front to win Best Cinematography with 9/5 odds,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Paul Thomas Anderson Won’t Stop Directing Intimate Haim Music Videos — Watch ‘Night So Long (Live at the Greek)’

Paul Thomas Anderson Won’t Stop Directing Intimate Haim Music Videos — Watch ‘Night So Long (Live at the Greek)’
Paul Thomas Anderson is having a very good week. Fresh off earning his second career Oscar nomination for Best Director, Anderson has debuted his latest music video for the band Haim. The band and Anderson have been tight-knit collaborators recently, with Anderson directing the 35mm short film “Valentine’s Day” and videos for songs “Right Now” and “Little of Your Love.” The latest clip is captures Haim performing a live rendition of “Night so Long” at the Greek Theater.

Read More:Paul Thomas Anderson Directs an Epic Haim Dance Party in ‘Little of Your Love’ Music Video — Watch

“I do music videos because the Haim girls are in my life,” Anderson recently told The Playlist about their creative collaboration. “As long as they’re around, I’ll hopefully be doing music videos for them. That’s one of the best creative relationships I’ve had in a while. I love those girls.
See full article at Indiewire »

Rotterdam Film Review: ‘Jimmie’

Rotterdam Film Review: ‘Jimmie’
How is it possible that no one thought to warn Jesper Ganslandt that putting blond Swedes in the role of fleeing refugees, in order to make today’s humanitarian crisis more accessible to Westerners, was a really, really bad concept? Good intentions make lousy paving stones, and in the case of “Jimmie,” the road leads to a seriously misguided place. Shot in a late Malickian style and starring Ganslandt’s 4-year-old son, Hunter, the film is meant as a full-immersion plunge into the terrors of escaping one’s homeland through hostile territory. Yet substituting Scandis for Syrians or Africans or Rohingya doesn’t increase empathy, it just smacks of “white lives matter.” While that surely isn’t the director’s goal, it’s hard to get beyond this unwanted consequence.

His timing also isn’t great: Could these be the Nordic refugees Trump wants to welcome? It’s especially unclear who “Jimmie” is meant to target, since
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Phantom Thread’ Live Orchestra Screenings Announced for Brooklyn and Los Angeles (With Presale Code!) — Exclusive

‘Phantom Thread’ Live Orchestra Screenings Announced for Brooklyn and Los Angeles (With Presale Code!) — Exclusive
Here’s another reason to be glad that composer Jonny Greenwood received his first Oscar nomination: He and director Paul Thomas Anderson are reteaming with Wordless Music and the London Contemporary Orchestra for two special live orchestra screenings of “Phantom Thread” in the two weeks leading up to the Academy Awards. The two live-score screenings will take place at Bam’s Howard Gilman Opera House in Brooklyn February 24, and at The Theatre at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles March 2.

Brooklyn-based Wordless Music specializes in live-score screenings of what the group deems to be the canon of modern cinema; previous performances include “The Tree of Life,” “Moonlight,” and “Under the Skin” as well as “There Will Be Blood,” for which Greenwood also performed with the group.

“Paul’s team got us into an early screening of ‘Phantom Thread’ and as soon as I saw it and heard that score, I knew
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance Review: ‘Minding the Gap’ is an Evocative Portrait of Lost Youth

Lorde’s song “Team,” with its lyrics “we live in cities you’ll never see on screen; not very pretty but we sure now how to run things,” seems to sum up the basic story of Bing Liu’s stirring, visually stunning study of time, place, and self. Minding the Gap is a shape-shifting documentary about lost youth stuck in a form of arrested development. They have not quite risen to the challenge of adulthood, stuck — as Springsteen fans know — in the darkness on the edge of town. Instead of music they turn to skating for salvation in fluid, sweeping low-angle, wide-lens shots that recall the collaborations of Terrence Malick and Emmanuel Lubezki.

At the center of the drama is Liu’s camera – and the gap he may be minding is what set him apart from his peers Zack and Keire. At age 24, Liu, a skateboarder-turned-cinematographer-and-director has achieved a certain
See full article at The Film Stage »

Paul Thomas Anderson Admits He’s Most Proud of ‘The Master’ and Wants Emmanuel Lubezki to Shoot One of His Films

Paul Thomas Anderson Admits He’s Most Proud of ‘The Master’ and Wants Emmanuel Lubezki to Shoot One of His Films
Paul Thomas Anderson has been making the press rounds as “Phantom Thread” heads into nationwide release, and his most recent bit of promotion included a Reddit Ama in which he was extremely blunt about a wide-ranging list of subjects. Many directors might have difficulty choosing which film they are most proud of, but not Anderson. The director listed “The Master” when asked, and he elaborated on one of the reasons the film is special to him in another response.

Read More:Daniel Day-Lewis Is One of the Best Actors Alive But Has the ‘Worst Taste in TV,’ Says Paul Thomas Anderson

“The first time we shot spherical was on ‘The Master,'” Anderson said. “It seemed like a good fit, evoking the old 50s films like ‘Vertigo’ and ‘North By Northwest,’ those large format films but in a boxy frame. It was a nice change from the earlier films. I wanna shoot scope again though…
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Phantom Thread’ Giveaway: Enter to Win a Prize Pack for Paul Thomas Anderson’s New Film

  • Indiewire
‘Phantom Thread’ Giveaway: Enter to Win a Prize Pack for Paul Thomas Anderson’s New Film
Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis have teamed up for one final film, and “Phantom Thread” has not disappointed. Filled with incredible performances from Day-Lewis, Lesley Manville and breakout Vicky Krieps, “Phantom Thread” is a serious Oscar contender in multiple categories, including Best Original Score thanks to long-time PTA collaborator Jonny Greenwood.

If you haven’t been able to stop listening to the film’s gorgeous soundtrack, you’re in luck. Our friends at Focus Features have teamed up with IndieWire and have put together a prize pack which includes a copy of the “Phantom Thread” score, a House of Woodcock tote bag and “The Women of Woodcock” coffee table book.

Read More:Jonny Greenwood’s Oscar-Worthy ‘Phantom Thread’ Score is Now Streaming in Its Entirety — Listen

To celebrate the wide release of “Phantom Thread,” we’ve giving away two of these prize packs to two lucky winners based in the United States.
See full article at Indiewire »

John Fink’s Top 10 Films of 2017

Film is certainly not dead! The box office may be down due to a steady diet of crap fed by the studio system, but even if Baywatch (the whipping boy for this year’s domestic box office) had been decent, would we have remembered it months later? Hollywood did churn out some good films–the best of which were considered crowd pleasers with a charm all their own; films like Coco and Girls Trip offered big laughs with a lot of heart. Those that took risks, notably Get Out, also found themselves rewarded while too much risk (mother!) proved to turn off casual moviegoers, even if they offered pleasure for those resisting a literal reading of what was on screen.

At the art house (and those multiplexes that offer a screen or two to quality films), it was a virtual embarrassment of cinematic riches, with no shortage of stimulating conversation
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Cinematography of 2017

“A cinematographer is a visual psychiatrist — moving an audience through a movie […] making them think the way you want them to think, painting pictures in the dark,” said the late, great Gordon Willis. As we continue our year-end coverage, one aspect we must highlight is, indeed, cinematography. From talented newcomers to seasoned professionals, we’ve rounded up the examples that have most impressed us this year. Check out our rundown below and, in the comments, let us know your favorite work.

All These Sleepless Nights (Michal Marczak, Maciej Twardowski)

Using the combination of a Steadicam and computerized gimbal, Michal Marczak and Maciej Twardowski float in and out of crowded dance floors, house parties, lush gardens, and sun-kissed beaches, all in a way that would make Emmanuel Lubezki proud. Coupled with a near-constant soundtrack of the latest in electronic and pop (as well as a Polish version of Pocahontas‘ “Colors of
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders

  • Indiewire
‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders
Every year, the studios take their best genre successes and try to push them beyond the technical ghetto. Oscar campaigners want to convince critics, guilds, and Oscar voters that their movie rises to the level of art. But it’s rare for fantasy, horror, thriller, action or comic-book movies to pass over to the Best Picture side.

When they do, it tends to be an exception like Peter Jackson’s fantasy trilogy “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. All three films scored Best Picture nominations and technical wins: “Fellowship” scored 13 nominations and wins for Makeup, Visual Effects, and Cinematography; “The Two Towers” earned six and won Sound Editing and VFX; and then came the ultimate triumph for the finale “The Return of the King”: a grand sweep of all 11 nominations including Best Picture. But while “Lotr” fell into the fantasy genre, it was boosted by the literary pedigree of J.R.R. Tolkien.
See full article at Indiewire »

Alejandro Iñarritu Ushers in the Future of Film With ‘Carne y Arena’

Alejandro Iñarritu Ushers in the Future of Film With ‘Carne y Arena’
Vr has long been seen as the future of entertainment, yet no film or TV production has been able to capture the true need for a 360-degree canvas — that is, until now. At Cannes, Alejandro Iñarritu unveiled his virtual reality experience, “Carne y Arena” (Flesh and Sand, or “Virtually Present, Physically Invisible,” as the exhibition is known at Lacma where it is on display). Critics could not stop raving, calling it “shattering” and “groundbreaking.”

The installation takes the participant through an attempt to cross the U.S./Mexico border, a horrific experience for so many immigrants. The viewer gets to observe violent border captures and watch dehydrated people, clearly in pain, being taken by police to detention centers. The participant can wander around or stay in place, watch the immigrants or the police while standing in the middle of the scene or to the side. Sticking your head inside one of the bodies shows its pulsing heart, which
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Academy Presenting Special Oscar Statuette To Director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Virtual Reality Carne y Arena

Achievement in Directing winner Alejandro G. IñárrituThe Revenant” at The 88th Oscars® in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, February 28, 2016. ©A.M.P.A.S.

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Wednesday (October 25) to present a Special Award – an Oscar® statuette – to director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s virtual reality installation, “Carne y Arena (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible),” in recognition of a visionary and powerful experience in storytelling.

“The Governors of the Academy are proud to present a special Oscar to ‘Carne y Arena,’ in which Alejandro Iñárritu and his cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki have opened for us new doors of cinematic perception,” said Academy President John Bailey. “‘Carne y Arena,’ Iñárritu’s multimedia art and cinema experience, is a deeply emotional and physically immersive venture into the world of migrants crossing the desert of the American southwest in early dawn light. More than
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Virtual Reality Project ‘Carne y Arena’ Wins Historic Special Oscar

Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Virtual Reality Project ‘Carne y Arena’ Wins Historic Special Oscar
The Academy’s Board of Governors has announced it will be giving a Special Award Oscar to Alejandro González Iñárritu’s virtual reality installation “Carne y Arena.” The award is being given “in recognition of a visionary and powerful experience in storytelling.” Only 18 Special Award Oscars have been handed out in the 90-year history of the Academy Awards. The last time the honor was given out was 22 years ago when John Lasseter was recognized for making the first CGI-animated feature with “Toy Story.”

Read More:Why Alejandro González Iñárritu is the Director Who Finally Got Vr Right

“Carne y Arena” is an installation that allows individuals to experience the refugee crisis occurring at the U.S.-Mexican border through the eyes of the refugees’ own journeys. Iñárritu collaborated with his longtime partner Emmanuel Lubezki on the project, which first debuted to rave reviews at Cannes and is now on display at
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites