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Join Popsugar Moms Today to Put an End to Bullying

  • Popsugar
Join Popsugar Moms Today to Put an End to Bullying
One in seven students in grades K-12 are either bullying or being bullied. October is National Bullying Prevention Month, a time designed to raise awareness of bullying's devastating effects on both its victims and their families. Kids who are bullied are more likely to experience both mental and physical health issues, including depression and anxiety, and see a decrease in academic achievement. Families are often left feeling helpless, but in fact, parents play a key role in preventing and responding to bullying. The first step is recognition of what bullying is and the different forms it can take. Join Popsugar Moms for the first in a series of Hangouts On Air today at 10 a.m. Pdt/1 p.m. Edt. We'll be sitting down with GLAAD, Pacer's National Bullying Prevention Center, Google, and Tina Long, whose 17-year-old son Tyler Long committed suicide as a result of bullying, to get the facts straight,
See full article at Popsugar »

Join Popsugar Moms Today to Put an End to Bullying

  • BuzzSugar
One in seven students in grades K-12 are either bullying or being bullied. October is National Bullying Prevention Month, a time designed to raise awareness of bullying's devastating effects on both its victims and their families. Kids who are bullied are more likely to experience both mental and physical health issues, including depression and anxiety, and see a decrease in academic achievement. Families are often left feeling helpless, but in fact, parents play a key role in preventing and responding to bullying. The first step is recognition of what bullying is and the different forms it can take. Join Popsugar Moms for the first in a series of Hangouts On Air today at 10 a.m. Pdt/1 p.m. Edt. We'll be sitting down with GLAAD, Pacer's National Bullying Prevention Center, Google, and Tina Long, whose 17-year-old son Tyler Long committed suicide as a result of bullying, to get the facts straight,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Mitt Romney's bully beef: film-maker takes him to task

Bully documentary director, Lee Hirsch, has called for the Republican presidential candidate to take a genuine stand after stories emerge of the latter's behaviour in high school

The director of high-profile Us documentary Bully has called on Mitt Romney to take a stand against bullying following revelations that the Republican presidential candidate made life a misery for a fellow pupil as a teenager.

Lee Hirsch, whose film examines the deaths of Us schoolchildren Tyler Long and Ty Smalley, who killed themselves after being bullied, said Romney's failure to issue a genuine apology for his actions were a missed opportunity that he hoped the former Massachusetts governor would reflect on. "This could be a true presidential moment for Mitt Romney," he told the Hollywood Reporter. "My hope is that he would recognise that we are past framing bullying as horseplay or pranking around. We need our leaders to call it as it is.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Bully' producer responds to allegations that the doc ignored key information -- Exclusive

'Bully' producer responds to allegations that the doc ignored key information -- Exclusive
Critics everywhere have hailed Bully as an important, engaging documentary. EW’s Owen Gleiberman calls it “sensitive and eye-opening”; the film has also earned a near-perfect 93 percent “Fresh” rating from the reviews aggregated by Rotten Tomatoes. But in an article posted late last week, Slate’s Emily Bazelon alleged that some crucial parts of Bully are “utterly one-sided” and “factually questionable.” Her piece focused on Tyler Long, one of the doc’s featured subjects; when he was just 17, Long took his own life, apparently because he was bullied by his classmates.

But according to Bazelon, that isn’t the whole story.
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Your Kids Should See 'Bully,' No Matter What the MPAA Says

  • NextMovie
Few documentaries have been thrust into the national spotlight quite like "Bully" has -- and for good reason.

In the spring of last year, when director Lee Hirsch's film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, critics and festivalgoers immediately took notice, resulting in the Weinstein Company's swooping in to pick it up for distribution. No small feat. Everything was going smoothly leading up to this Friday's release -- until the film was slapped with an R rating by the MPAA. The surprise move by the ratings board made headlines, and angered Harvey Weinstein to no end.

He has good reason to be mad, and not just because the movie's R rating will hinder the film's box-office potential.

"Bully," a documentary that sheds some much needed light on the bullying epidemic in America, is the sort of film that demands to be seen by the generation it depicts. How can
See full article at NextMovie »

Debating "Bully"

  • MUBI
Two controversies greet a documentary's opening this weekend. Salon is best on the one you've probably heard about; Slate uncovers another you likely haven't. Let's start with Salon's Andrew O'Hehir: "With its unerring instinct for being on the wrong side of every major social and aesthetic issue, the Motion Picture Association of America's ratings board has refused to budge off its R rating for Bully, an earnest and moving documentary made for and about tormented preteens and teenagers." And "what's really perverse, of course — not to mention cruel and repellent — is a ratings decision that ensures that the kids who most need the succor that Bully has to offer are now the least likely to see it." Further in:

Without doubt, the MPAA has handed Bully director Lee Hirsch and Harvey Weinstein, whose company is releasing the film, a formidable marketing weapon and a tremendous amount of free publicity…. Mind you,
See full article at MUBI »

Director Lee Hirsch Bully Interview

  • Collider.com
It is estimated that over 13 million American kids will be bullied this year, making it the most common form of violence experienced by young people in the nation. The new documentary Bully puts a human face on that frightening statistic, with an unflinching look at just how deeply bullying effects kids and their families. By telling the stories of 12-year-old Alex from Iowa, 16-year-old Kelby from Oklahoma, 14-year-old Ja’Meya from Mississippi, and the families of 17-year-old Tyler Long and 11-year-old Ty Smalley, who both lost their sons to suicide after relentless bullying, the film captures a growing movement to change how bullying is handled in schools, in communities and in society as a whole. During this recent exclusive interview with Collider, filmmaker Lee Hirsch talked about how the idea for this documentary developed out of having been bullied as a kid, wanting to give a voice to kids who are suffering,
See full article at Collider.com »

Weinsteins to release Bully unrated in protest at censors

The MPAA's decision to rate the anti-bullying film R for bad language means its target audience of under-17s can't see it unaccompanied, the Weinstein Company said

The Oscar-winning producer Harvey Weinstein will take on Us censors by releasing the anti-bullying documentary Bully without a rating.

The Weinstein Company, which Harvey owns with brother Bob, had warned the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) that it was considering the move following censors' decision to hand Lee Hirsch's high-profile film an R certificate, meaning children under the age of 17 could not see it unless accompanied by an adult in the Us. After censors refused to overturn the decision, which was made on the grounds of several instances of bad language, the Weinsteins issued a statement yesterday announcing the film will be released unrated.

The move means it will be up to individual cinemas in the Us to decide whether to show the film.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cinema With Sharlette: 'Bully'

Cinema With Sharlette: 'Bully'
The term "bully" stirs up fear and memories of torment for those who have experienced this form of abuse. It is probably why documentary filmmaker Lee Hirsch decided to title his latest film simply, Bully.

Known for his documentary features that highlight the need for human rights, (Amandla! A Revolution In Four Part Harmony) Hirsh joins the bully awareness movement by revealing the grim realities of this epidemic. Being a victim of bullying himself, Hirsh always wanted to make this film. It was the suicide of bullied victims, Carl Joseph Walker and Jaheem Herrera, both 11-years-old, that prompted Hirsch to fully focus his attention to the completion of this project. In Bully, we meet three inspiring kids who agree to share their experiences.

Lady Gaga Talks Bullying Prevention at White House

Alex, called by his bullies, "Fishface," is a 12-year-old boy who has endured bullying for most of his life. Without being too
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Bully documentary gathers petition support

Petition gains more than 200,000 signatures as victims campaign against R rating of anti-bullying film

A petition launched by an American teenager aimed at overturning the recent decision by Us censors to hand a high-profile anti-bullying documentary a prohibitive rating has gained more than 200,000 signatures.

High-school student Katy Butler, herself a victim of bullying, began gathering signatures just one week ago in response to the Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) move to hand Lee Hirsch's film Bully an R rating, which means many of its target audience will not be able to see it. The film's distributor, Oscar-winning producer Harvey Weinstein, has also been vocal in his disapproval of the decision, threatening to boycott the MPAA's ratings process in protest.

Butler, from Ann Arbor, Michigan, is calling for the film to be given a PG rating, hand-delivering the signatures to the La office of the MPAA today. Launching her Change.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

American Idol Recap: Oh But She's Weird and She's Wonderful

  • TVLine.com
American Idol Recap: Oh But She's Weird and She's Wonderful
Regardless of your contestant allegiance heading into the American Idol Top 3 results-show telecast, there were reasons to celebrate by the time the credits stopped rolling and the season finale of [cue imitation of Fox voiceover guy] Bohhhhhhhnzzzz [end imitation of Fox voiceover guy] began.

Fans of country music, the vitality of youth, plaid shirts, denim jackets, sparkly cowboy boots, the Make a Wish for Nigel Lythgoe Foundation, and the act of locking them doors and turning the lights down low had to be psyched to learn that the Season 10 finale will be a battle between 17-year-old Scotty McCreery and 16-year-old Lauren Alaina, the youngest teen-vs.-teen finale in the history of the franchise.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Lauren Alaina Shed Tears When Visiting Tornado-Damaged Hometown

"American Idol" finalist Lauren Alaina returned home to Georgia over the weekend, and saw up-close the damage the May 4 tornado has caused. Amidst her busy schedule on Saturday, May 14, the 16-year-old aspiring singer made time to meet with tornado victims and was brought to tears upon listening to a young survivor's story.

People Magazine reported that Lauren visited a shelter at the Cherokee Valley Baptist Church in nearby Ringold. There, she met Tyler Long. The 11-year-old survived the tornado despite being thrown 200 yards from his family's mobile home, but lost his grandfather and had his infant brother in the ICU with a bleeding brain. His pregnant mother also lost her baby.

To Lauren, Tyler said, "I felt scared and I prayed, but I just wanted to find my family first." Upon hearing his story, this season's Top 3 contestant on "Idol" asked him, "How can you be so brave?" The Rossville,
See full article at Celebrity Mania »

Tearful Idol Lauren Alaina Visits Tornado-Damaged Hometown

  • PEOPLE.com
Tearful Idol Lauren Alaina Visits Tornado-Damaged Hometown
It was a bittersweet return to Georgia for Lauren Alaina, who finally saw up-close the April 27 tornado damage that leveled houses near her town of Rossville. "She's trying to get her composure," mom Kristy Suddeth said Saturday after a sobbing Lauren visited a shelter at the Cherokee Valley Baptist Church in nearby Ringold as part of her American Idol homecoming. "These people don't need to see somebody crying. They need to see somebody smiling." Lauren met 11-year-old Tyler Long, who was thrown 200 yards from his family's mobile home and managed to find and comfort family members, including his 8-year-old brother Connor and 10-month-old Ryder.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

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