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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998

1-20 of 238 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Fiennes, Linklater get Lfs associateships

9 December 2014 4:16 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Linklater, Fiennes and Kate Kinninmont MBE receive associateships at Annual Show.

Richard Linklater, Ralph Fiennes and Kate Kinninmont MBE were last night [Dec 8] awarded honorary associateships by the London Film School at its Annual Show at the Barbican Centre.

The associateships were presented by the Lfs chairman and 1964 graduate, Mike Leigh, and the new Lfs director, Jane Roscoe.

Fiennes will follow the tradition of past honorary associates, including Stephen Frears and Samantha Morton, by holding a Q&A session at the school in the new year.

Previous honorary associates include Amma Asante, Ken Loach, Lynne Ramsay and Jim Broadbent.

Leigh said: “We welcome our new honorary associates and, as we head towards our sixtieth anniversary in 2016 and the move to the Barbican in 2017, we thank all the valued supporters and partners joining with us on this exciting journey.”

Films by Lfs graduates have accounted for 200 festival entries this year and won 30 prizes across the globe.​ »

- Laurence.Bartleet@city.ac.uk (Larry Bartleet)

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Nightcrawler injects fresh blood into anemic B.O.

30 November 2014 4:20 PM, PST | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

In a lousy session for new releases, Nightcrawler was the best of a bad lot in Australian cinemas last weekend.

Jake Gyllenhaal.s chilling turn as a sociopath in writer-director Dan Gilroy.s biting satire of media exploitation and corruption delivered $576,000 on 96 screens.

That's a reasonable start for the indie thriller co-starring Riz Ahmed, Rene Russo and Bill Paxton, which has earned $US28.7 million in its first month in the Us.

Nationwide takings plunged by 37% to $11.1 million, which was way below the corresponding week for the past two years, according to Rentrak.s estimates.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 raked in nearly $5.8 million, despite selling around half as many tickets as in the opening weekend, but has amassed a lucrative $20.8 million.

Chris Nolan.s Interstellar banked $1.6 million in its fourth orbit, down 25%, advancing to $15.6 million.

Paul Fenech's Fat Pizza vs Housos opened with a mediocre $296,000 on 121 screens, »

- Don Groves

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Fremaux, Hazanavicius, Bejo Bring Cannes Crème to Buenos Aires (Exclusive)

30 November 2014 2:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Buenos Aires — In what may prove a prototype for more ventures around the globe, Cannes topper Thierry Fremaux will program and present the first Cannes Festival Film Week in Buenos Aires with Michel Hazanavicius (“The Artist,” “The Search”) and Berenice Bejo in attendance.

The Semana de Cine del Festival de Cannes, as it is called in Spanish, runs Dec. 1-7.

But the Cannes Festival may not now stop at Buenos Aires, or Bucharest, where a similar event has taken place since 2010.

“We have projects to bring films all over the world. Cristian Mungiu is already organizing a showcase in Bucharest. It’s not so important for us as for the films,” Fremaux said, explaining that the Cannes Festival Film Week was not an attempt to launch a second Cannes Festival outside France.

But Cannes was “looking at territories where it would be beneficial to have a Cannes presence,” Fremaux added. »

- John Hopewell

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From Tatler to Gogglebox: how TV learned to love posh people

24 November 2014 11:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Upper-class types are all over our screens with their red cords, strange rules and loud opinions. Why now? Ken Loach, Grayson Perry and Francis Fulford try to explain the appeal

The features editor of Tatler is explaining an item in the magazine, a Town v Country matrix, a graphic representation of different Tatler camps. So in this corner of the page is a picture of a labradoodle, which is the dog you might have if you were New Town, recently arrived in London. While if you’re Old Country, you’ll have this black labrador over here, who’s “probably about 500 years old and farts and is enormous and fat, but you love it more than your children”. New Country red wellies, Old Country red cords; Old Town cocaine, Old Country sloe gin etc. Old Town and Old Country are also referred to as “real deal” by the features editor, »

- Sam Wollaston

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Andrew Scott's 6 Degrees of Assassination: "It's a gripping thriller"

24 November 2014 1:00 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Sherlock's Andrew Scott is taking on a new role, playing an MI5 operative in a new ten-part action thriller. But this new series isn't coming to TV - 6 Degrees of Assassination is an exciting new audio series, available on Audible.co.uk.

The Pride star is joined by Doctor Who's Freema Agyeman and Spooks veteran Hermione Norris for this edge-of-your-seat drama from the pen of Silent Witness writer Matt J Arlidge.

Digital Spy spoke to Andrew about his passion for audio drama - and why he hopes Sherlock fans will check out his new project.

What is 6 Degrees of Assassination and who is your character Alex Cartwright?

"It's a political thriller and it's for a mainstream audience and we've had great fun doing it. I play a guy called Alex Cartwright, who is a senior counter-terrorism officer at MI5.

"It's a ten-part half-hour audio series and we've got »

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Camerimage: ‘Killing Fields’ Cinematographer Chris Menges on Keeping it Real

20 November 2014 11:24 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Bydgoszcz, Poland — Whether shooting handheld on film in a war zone or creating a chilling digital period piece for “The Reader,” it’s never about technique or technology, according to two-time Oscar winner Chris Menges.

Instead, the master cinematographer advises, “It’s about tone.”

The lenser of Roland Joffe’s “The Killing Fields” and “The Mission” presented his inspirations and lessons at Poland’s Camerimage fest Wednesday as dozens of industry vets and emerging shooters leaned in for counsel from the soft-spoken D.P.

The fit 74-year-old, who shot Steven Knight’s “Redemption” last year as his 59th pic, is remarkably humble about his work, citing story, director, actors and location as primary building blocks for good film before getting to crew.

“If you’ve got locations right, you’re onto a winner,” he says — although the effort to capture the authentic backdrop of Southeast Asian conflicts of the 60s »

- Will Tizard

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Writers Guild Italia & The Black List Pact; Ed Guiney Set For Efa Honor: Global Showbiz Briefs

17 November 2014 10:00 PM, PST | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

The Writers Guild Italia and the Black List have formed a new alliance, paving the way for Wgi members to list their scripts in the Black List database. The Black List has similar partnerships with the WGA West and East, the Writers Guild of Great Britain and the Writers Guild of Canada. However, this is the first time it has partnered with a non-English-speaking guild – a sign that good unproduced ideas come in many forms. An Italian film, The Great Beauty, of course won the Foreign Language Film Oscar last year — returning the statue to the country for the first time in 15 years — and local comedies are consistently hot at the box office. The Black List notes that although most Wgi members write primarily in Italian, many have great facility with the English language. Given the fluid language barriers, plus translation, and the unique point of view, culture, and style »

- Nancy Tartaglione

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Ed Guiney to receive Efa award

17 November 2014 3:37 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Irish producer behind The Guard and Frank to receive European Co-production Award.

Irish producer Ed Guiney, who has recently worked with Lenny Abrahamson and Yorgos Lanthimos, is to receive the European Co-production Award - Prix Eurimages.

The award, which will Guiney will receive at the European Film Awards in Riga on Dec 13, acknowledges the role of co-productions in the European film industry.

Guiney co-founded Element Pictures with Andrew Lowe in 2001 and has offices in Dublin and London, working across production, distribution, and exhibition. Element has been involved in the production and distribution of more than 30 feature films.

Current and upcoming Element productions include Room, an adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s award-winning best-selling novel, directed by Abrahamson and starring Brie Larson, Joan Allen and William H.Macy; Yorgos Lanthimos’ first English language film, The Lobster starting Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, John C. Reilly, Lea Seydoux and Ben Wishaw; Gerard Barrett’s Glassland, starring [link=nm »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Irish Producer Ed Guiney to Receive European Co-Production Award

17 November 2014 2:20 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Bydgoszcz, Poland — The European Co-Production Award — Prix Eurimages, which honors an individual working in the vanguard of European movie co-productions, will go to Irish producer Ed Guiney.

The award will be presented during the European Film Awards ceremony in Riga, Latvia on Dec. 13.

Guiney co-founded Element Pictures with Andrew Lowe in 2001. Today, Element has offices in Dublin and London, working across production, distribution, and exhibition.

Element has been involved in the production and distribution of more than 30 feature films. Current and upcoming Element productions include Yorgos Lanthimos’ first English-language film, “The Lobster,” starting Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, John C. Reilly, Lea Seydoux and Ben Whishaw, “Room,” an adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s novel, directed by Lenny Abrahamson and starring Brie Larson, Joan Allen and William H. Macy, Gerard Barrett’s “Glassland,” starring Jack Reynor, Toni Colette and Will Poulter, and Jerzy Skolimowski’s “11 Minutes.”

Recently completed Element productions include Abrahamson’s “Frank, »

- Leo Barraclough

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DVD Review: 'The Golden Dream'

13 November 2014 12:04 PM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ Diego Quemada-Díez’s debut film The Golden Dream (2013) so impressed at Cannes in 2013 that it received a special award and fulsome praise from Ken Loach. It tells the simple and familiar story of three young Guatemalans who decide to leave their homeland and travel through Mexico towards the 'dream' of the United States. Cocksure, but not quite as competent as he thinks he is, Juan (Brandon Lopez) is the leader, joined by Sara (Karen Martinez) who we initially see cutting her hair off and strapping it to her chest in order to transform herself into a boy called Osvaldo. Samuel (Carlos Chajon) is the third of the trio, whose previous employment required scavenging a living from giant rubbish dumps.

»

- CineVue UK

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Wild Bunch to launch pan-European digital distribution

31 October 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

First title destined for e-distribution slate is Eli Roth’s The Green Inferno. Company will be on hunt for suitable titles at the Afm.

Following the success of its VOD-only release of Welcome to New York earlier this year, Wild Bunch is poised to launch Europe’s first pan-European e-distribution operation.

Taking inspiration from the innovative models of Us distributors such as RADiUS, A24 and the IFC, the e-distribution operation will propose films either directly to different VOD services, or when legislation allows, simultaneously via VOD and in theatres.

“We wouldn’t be doing this if the release of Welcome to New York had not been a success and we weren’t convinced of the potential of this market,” said Wild Bunch co-founder Vincent Maraval.

Aside from the performance of Welcome to New York, which clocked some 200,000 downloads in six weeks, the company is also basing it plans on the results of the European Commission’s media »

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Wild Bunch to launch pan-European digital distribution

31 October 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

First title destined for e-distribution slate is Eli Roth’s The Green Inferno. Company will be on hunt for suitable titles at the Afm.

Following the success of its VOD-only release of Welcome to New York earlier this year, Wild Bunch is poised to launch Europe’s first pan-European e-distribution operation.

Taking inspiration from the innovative models of Us distributors such as RADiUS, A24 and the IFC, the e-distribution operation will propose films either directly to different VOD services, or when legislation allows, simultaneously via VOD and in theatres.

“We wouldn’t be doing this if the release of Welcome to New York had not been a success and we weren’t convinced of the potential of this market,” said Wild Bunch co-founder Vincent Maraval.

Aside from the performance of Welcome to New York, which clocked some 200,000 downloads in six weeks, the company is also basing it plans on the results of the European Commission’s media »

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Corn Island wins at Athens Panorama

27 October 2014 5:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Panorama of European Cinema Festival pays tribute to Suleiman, Laverty, Ferris and Tsiolis.

The Georgian/German co-production Corn Island (Simindis kundzuli) directed by George Ovashvili swept the floor at the 27th Panorama of European Cinema Festival awards gala.

This poetic tale on the cycle of life told through the story of an old Abkhaz peasant and his teenage granddaughter received the two main awards, from the Fipresci jury and the audience.

The Fipresci award named after the late Greek master Theo Angelopoulos was handed over by his widow, producer Phoebe Angelopoulos.

Produced by Kazakhfilm, Focus-Fox Studio and the director’s own company, Corn Island is sold worldwide by France’s Pascale Ramonda.

Career awards were presented to Palestinian director Elia Suleiman and to longtime Ken Loach collaborator, screenwriter Tom Laverty.

While receiving his award Laverty, made an impassioned reference to the Greek social and financial crisis in  the presence of deputy culture minister Angela Gerekou who awarded »

- alexisgrivas@yahoo.com (Alexis Grivas)

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Film Review: ‘Ariane’s Thread’

20 October 2014 7:09 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

For more than 30 years, Robert Guediguian and his merry band of loyal actors made deeply humanistic films set among Marseille’s working class — sunlit, somewhat fanciful variations on Ken Loach’s grittier oeuvre. But as the bonds of worker solidarity have grown increasingly fragile, the director has transported his repertory of regulars into other times and spaces and, in “Ariane’s Thread,” squarely into dreamland. Though this joyful proletarian commedia dell’arte lacks the mythical dimension of Renoir’s “Golden Coach” or Fellini’s “8½,” and is unlikely even to enjoy the popularity of Guediguian’s “Marius and Jeanette” (1997), the helmer’s fans will not be disappointed.

Seemingly abandoned by friends and family on her birthday, Ariane (the helmer’s lifelong partner and muse, Ariane Ascaride), leaves her suburban apartment and winds up, sans money or phone, in a picturesque seaside restaurant. The place caters to an elderly clientele of habitués »

- Ronnie Scheib

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Pedro Almodovar Feted As Thierry Frémaux’s Lumière Fest Nears Close

18 October 2014 8:07 AM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

The Lumière Festival was created by Cannes chief Thierry Frémaux and Lumière Institute President Bertrand Tavernier six years ago here in Lyon, the birthplace of cinema. As the week-long event that wraps tomorrow has grown, it has become a favorite stop on the calendar for filmmakers, film buffs and friends of Frémaux to attend. It includes restorations, masterclasses and retrospectives, but no competition. And it’s not just art-house either — tonight’s program includes an Alien marathon presented by Jean-Pierre Jeunet and a screening of Die Hard with John McTiernan hosting. Last year’s Prix Lumière winner, Quentin Tarantino, spent several days soaking up the scene here in 2013. This year’s recipient of the Lumière Prize, which has previously also gone to Milos Forman, Gérard Depardieu, Ken Loach and Clint Eastwood, was Oscar-winning Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar.

On Friday night, a two-and-a-half hour tribute to Almodovar concluded with a rousing »

- Nancy Tartaglione

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Daily | In the Works | Argento, Loach, Tavernier

15 October 2014 4:40 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup of interesting projects that have been announced in the past week or so: Iggy Pop and Dario Argento are collaborating on an adaptation of E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman"; an interactive documentary on Ken Loach is in the works; Bertrand Tavernier is working on a personal exploration of French cinema; Bruno Dumont is open to the idea of a second season for P'tit Quinquin; Scarlett Johansson is will star in and executive produce an eight-episode adaptation of Edith Wharton's 1913 novel The Custom of the Country; Stephen Sondheim is at work on a new musical with the playwright David Ives (Venus in Fur) based on two renowned films by Luis Buñuel, El ángel exterminador and Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie; and more. » - David Hudson »

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Ian Hart interview: The Driver, British film, Harry Potter

14 October 2014 6:32 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We chatted to Ian Hart about his on-screen reunion with David Morrissey in The Driver, Us TV, British film, Agents Of Shield and more...

You’ll know Ian Hart’s face, even if you can’t quite place his name. It’s a great face, his, adaptably young and old, as comfortable atop a tracksuit as it is underneath a period trilby. Since his first real role as Scouse tearaway Rabbit in 1983 drama One Summer (alongside childhood friend and The Driver co-star David Morrissey), Hart has avoided type-casting by leaping from role to role and film to film with convincing ease. He’s played scallies, authors, footballers, drug dealers, psychiatrists, CIA agents, physicists and nineteenth century gangsters. He’s played Beethoven, Nobby Stiles, Hitler, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Voldemort (sort of), and John Lennon (thrice). 

Three-part BBC One drama The Driver saw Hart play twins Col and Craig, one an »

- louisamellor

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Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

11 October 2014 5:32 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus, »

- Andre Soares

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Ken Loach project wins top PttP prize

10 October 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Short-listed projects included On Screen Off Screen and How To Kill Uffie.

Interactive documentary The Flickering Flame, exploring Ken Loach’s 50-year career, has won the Arte International Prize at the Pixel Market.

The website, app and film is being overseen by Ken Loach’s long-time producer Rebecca O’Brien at Sixteen Films in collaboration with Paris-based digital production house Upian.

As previously reported by ScreenDaily, the production will explore Loach’s career through the battles he and his team faced to make his films. 

The filmmaker’s son Jim Loach, whose own credits include Oranges and Sunshine and episodes of TV series such as Shameless and Dci Banks, is directing the central, interview-led documentary.

The Flickering Flame was among eight projects in the running for the Arte prize, all of which were pitched at the Pixel Market Finance Forum on Wednesday (Oct 8) and then discussed in one-to-one meetings in the Pixel Market the following day.[p »

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Ken Loach interactive doc unveiled

8 October 2014 8:09 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Flickering Flame will explore the director’s 50-year career through the battles he fought to make films.

Sixteen Films unveiled details of an ambitious interactive biography titled The Flickering Flame, exploring the career of director Ken Loach at the Power to the Pixel Finance Cross-Media Forum today.

“At the project’s centre will be an interview-led documentary which explores the different battles that not only inspired Ken’s films but have also arisen in the process of getting them made,” said producer Rebecca O’Brien, Loach’s long-time collaborator at production house Sixteen Films.

Loach’s son, Jim Loach, has been commissioned to direct the film, which will feature interviews with the filmmaker’s detractors as well as his collaborators.

O’Brien said these “battles” ranged from the political, referring to the rage in the UK’s right-wing press over the Palme d’Or-winning The Wind That Shakes The Barley; to the social, as was the »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998

1-20 of 238 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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