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1-20 of 22 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Shaw Bros. Sat.: ‘The Man with the Iron Fists’ is as close as it gets to modern day Shaw

1 December 2012 8:36 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Man with the Iron Fists

Directed by RZA

Written by RZA and Eli Roth

U.S.A., 2012

The RZA’s directorial debut, The Man with the Iron Fists, is not a Shaw Brothers picture. It was released by Universal Studios, although its inclusion in the column feels right for reasons that shall be discussed in the review below, reasons which should also appear as evident for anyone who has seen the film. The RZA is certainly not a name one would immediately associate with potential first time directors, regardless of genre. However, his association with the classic martial arts films from the 60, 70s and 80s, most notably those which the Shaw Brothers studio churned out like hot cakes, goes back to his childhood, when he would venture to the nearest cinema on the 47th street in New York that would frequently give them some play. It was love at »

- Edgar Chaput

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Chang Cheh (張徹): The Legendary Director

4 November 2012 7:51 AM, PST | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Chang Chen is one of the best directors in Kung Fu cinema, known as the main man behind many Shaw Brothers classics, Chang Chen always brings blood and guts as well as having a great story line and great characters in his movies.

Some of my favorite movies of he’s are, Vengeance, Boxer From Shantung, Five Venom’s, Shaolin Martial Arts plus many more. He always brought great depth within most of his characters unless he just went all out and wanted a very bloody movie filled with fights. John Woo was also a big fan of Chang’s and also learnt a lot from him working on certain movies. He gave us raw power in terms of the leading males in his movies and with Lau Kar Leung choreographing many of the fight scenes, you know your in for a real treat.

Born:February 10, 1923,Shanghai, China

Died:June 22, 2002 (aged 79), Hong »

- kingofkungfu

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Fu Sheng: Sb movie legend

3 November 2012 12:28 PM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Fu Sheng is a legend in the Kung Fu world, if you like all the old Shaw Brothers movies then you will certainly know who Fu Sheng is and why he is loved all over the world. He as made some excellent Kung Fu movies and was the Shaw Brothers equivalent to Jackie Chan.

Selected Filmography

1974:Shaolin Martial Arts

1974:Heroes Two

1975:Marco Polo

1975:Disciples Of Shaolin

1977:Chinatown Kid

1977:The Brave Archer

1978:Avenging Eagle

Biography

Alexander was born as Cheung Fu-Sheng in 20 October 1954 in Hong Kong, the son of a wealthy New Territories indigenous inhabitant businessman. His youth was characterized by his quick temper, disinterest in school, and fighting in the streets. As a child, his family lived in Hawaii for a few years and there he began training in judo and karate.

In 1971, he enrolled at Shaw Brothers Southern Drama School and instantly drew the attention of director Cheung Cheh. »

- kingofkungfu

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Q&A: King Of Kung Fu

7 October 2012 4:30 PM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Firstly i would like to thank everyone that put questions forward for my first Q&A session on Asian Movie Pulse, myself and everyone on the site would like to thank you for your continued support and hope we can all continue to grow together and make this one of the best sites on the net.

If you put questions forward and they didn’t make it this time, do not worry as we will keep them for the next Q&A session in the near future. So here we go, i hope you enjoy everyones questions and the answers i put forward.

Q1:Do you think the martial arts movie industry has declined over the years, Will we ever have a new consistent jackie chan and jet li movie star? – By:Nile Dragon

A) Hi Nile, it is a bit of a strange one as we know in the 70′s till the late 80′s, »

- kingofkungfu

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Cine Asia Presents: A new wave of classics

26 September 2012 12:07 PM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Cine-asia Is Excited To Announce A New Wave Of Hkl Classics Set To Be Re-released On DVD Under The Cine-asia Presents Hkl Banner

Arriving In UK Stores And Online Stockists

15Th October 2012

<

My Lucky Stars

In his first historic feature for a Western audience, Jackie takes up the role of Jerry Kwan, a flamboyant Kung Fu expert, forced to compete in a no-holds-barred street-fighting tournament by heavy-hitting syndicate mobsters.

Crafted by the director and producer that brought you the Bruce Lee classic Enter the Dragon, Battle Creek Brawl is a stunning showcase for the remarkable physical prowess of Jackie Chan. Performing some of the fastest and most powerful Wing Chun hand techniques ever recorded on film, Jackie also stops the show with a multi-point bicycle-kick performed effortlessly without the aid of a wire!

Combining action, romance and Chan’s remarkable physical comedy, Battle Creek Brawl is a dynamic martial-arts extravaganza, »

- kingofkungfu

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Fantasia 2012/Shaw Bros. Sat.: ‘Fists of the White Lotus’ demonstrates that it’s cool to fight like a girl

4 August 2012 12:57 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Fists of the White Lotus (aka: Clan of the White Lotus)

Directed by Lo Lieh

Written by Tien Huang

Hong Kong, 1980

*This week’s film was recently viewed at the 2012 Fantasia International Film Festival on a 35mm print, hence its inclusion in both the Fantasia 2012 and Shaw Brothers Saturdays columns.

The old, evil martial arts master who can still pack a thunderous punch, often demolishing anyone who stands in his path with precise, near-effortless movements. He dresses in white, laughs a powerful laugh and frequently passes his hands on his white beard when in thought. The image is fond one among many a martial arts movie fan. For many, their first ever exposure to the character was in Quentin Tarantino’s 2004 feature, Kill Bill: Vol. 2. the truth of the matter is that the old kung fu master has made numerous appearances in much older action films. In fact, not »

- Edgar Chaput

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King Of Kung Fu – Top 40 Kung Fu Movies – 70′S (30-21)

31 July 2012 1:08 PM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

This is a run down of my Top 40 kung fu movies of the 1970′s. There were so many great films in this era, that i just hope i do this list some justice. The movies chosen are just my personal choice, i understand others might have different views.

Any of the movies that make the Top 40 list must have something special to make it in the first place. So i hope you enjoy my Top 40 Kung Fu movies.

 

30:Iron Fisted Monk

Starring: Sammo Hung, Fung Hak On, Chan Sing, James Tien

The Husker has a heart of gold although he is full of tricks. When he is a trainee at Shaolin Temple, he cuts so many corners and devises so many labor-saving ploys that he earns the open wrath and secret admiration of his holy elders. Monk Shan, the famous kung fu master, never lets his buddhist association stand in the way of wining, »

- kingofkungfu

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Fantasia 2012/Shaw Bros. Sat.: ‘Fists of the White Lotus’ demonstrates that it’s cool to fight like a girl

28 July 2012 12:23 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Fists of the White Lotus (aka: Clan of the White Lotus)

Directed by Lo Lieh

Written by Tien Huang

Hong Kong, 1980

 *This week’s film was viewed at the 2012 Fantasia International film festival on a 35mm print, hence its inclusion in both the Shaw Brothers Saturdays and Fantasia 2012 columns.

The old, evil martial arts master who can still pack a thunderous punch, often demolishing anyone who stands in his path with precise, near-effortless movements. He dresses in white, laughs a powerful laugh and frequently strokes his white beard when in thought. The image is fond one among many a martial arts movie fan. For many, their first ever exposure to the character was in Quentin Tarantino’s 2004 feature, Kill Bill: Vol. 2. the truth of the matter is that the old kung fu master has made numerous appearances in much older action films. In fact, not so long ago in this very column, »

- Edgar Chaput

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Red Band Trailer For RZA's The Man With The Iron Fists

28 June 2012 6:54 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

The Red Band trailer for RZA's The Man With The Iron Fists will be the subject of scrutiny by Kung Fu cinema purists around the world. All of the hours we committed to watching movies from studios like Shaw Brothers and Golden Harvest have instantly made us experts in the genre as we begin the ruthless evaluation of each second of this trailer. Does RZA's love letter to Kung Fu cinema hold a candle up to the heritage set by the genre's forefathers like Chang Cheh and Lau Kar-leung? Make yourselves heard after watching the trailer below! »

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Top 5 Kung Fu Choreographers of all time

28 June 2012 6:17 PM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

5.Corey Yuen

Other names: 元奎

Yuan Kui

Yuan2 Kui1

Cory Yuen

Don Yuen

Yuen Fooi

Nationality: Hong Kong

Workplace: France, Hong Kong, USA

Cory Yuen as been choreographing movies since 1973, is first movie was Chinese Hercules, starring Bolo Yeung. He was a member of the Peking Opera Schools and one of the Seven Little Fortunes. In July 1981, Yuen made his Hong Kong directorial debut in 1982 film Ninja in the Dragon’s Den, along with Hiroyuki Sanada, Conan Lee and Hwang Jang Lee. In June 1985, Yuen made his American directorial debut in 1986 film No Retreat, No Surrender, which marked the film debut of Belgium martial artist actor Jean-Claude Van Damme.

n 1993, he began an alliance and good friendship with action star Jet Li. He directed several of Li’s films, beginning with Fong Sai-yuk and Fong Sai-yuk II, and continuing through The Bodyguard from Beijing, The New Legend of Shaolin and My Father Is a Hero, »

- kingofkungfu

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Hong Kong 15 Film Festival’ Announces Full Guest Line Up

28 June 2012 9:21 AM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

A screen legend, a veteran film producer and talented fresh gems of Hong Kong film making, all brought together in London for the highly anticipated ‘Hong Kong 15 Film Festival’ from 2nd – 14th July 2012.

The Festival is thrilled to introduce new emerging talent, first-time and established filmmakers reflecting the vibrancy and energy of Hong Kong cinema. For this special occasion, world renowned star Jimmy Wang Yu and producer Roger Lee will be appearing in their respective film screenings, along with acclaimed directors Fung Chih Chiang and Jessey Tsang.

Famed in both Hong Kong and international film circles, Jimmy Wang Yu is widely credited as being the first Hong Kong Kung Fu star and this veteran of over 80 films has been a vital part of the evolution of Hong Kong action films since he joined Shaw Brothers studio in 1963.

He is still actively acting four decades later and ‘Hong Kong 15 Film Festival »

- kingofkungfu

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Hong Kong 15 Film Festival Full Line up Announced – 2nd July – 14th July – Odeon Covent Garden.

17 June 2012 4:04 AM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Hong Kong 15 Film Festival announces its much anticipated programme to mark the 15th Anniversary of the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty

1st July marks fifteen years since Hong Kong returned to Chinese sovereignty. To commemorate this special occasion, the Hong Kong Economic Trade Office, London, in association with Terracotta Festival, has put together an exciting film festival to showcase the best of current Hong Kong films as well as to look back on the last fifteen years and beyond.

 

When & Where

The ‘Hong Kong 15 Film Festival’ will take place at the Odeon Covent Garden, London, commencing 2nd July 2012 for a fortnight until 14th July. With guests in attendance and fifteen films carefully selected, the festival will pay tribute to the extraordinary story of this vibrant and energetic island city through the eyes of its film-makers.

The diversity of Hong Kong cinema will be represented through a panorama of »

- Tiger33

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Fung Hak On – One Of The Greatest Villains Ever.

8 June 2012 4:53 AM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Over the years having watched many kung fu movies, one person as stood out above the rest as my favorite villain, his name is Fung Hak On.

His presence on screen was fantastic, not only a great fighter and villain, but he is also a very good actor and could show lots of emotion with even one single look (Most look’s ended with someone getting killed though).

Birth-date : 18/9/1949

At the start of his career, Fung started off more as a stuntman and also having brief appearances in movies such as Vengeance, Heroic Ones, Water Margin plus many others. A few years later, the director he was working with at the time Chang Cheh, also had an assistant working with him, going by the name of John Woo. John Woo was just learning the process back then, but Fung was glad to work with Woo on his first ever directorial movie The Young dragons. »

- kingofkungfu

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Shaw Brothers Saturdays: ‘Executioners of Shaolin’ demonstrates that execution is indeed everything

2 June 2012 8:52 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Executioners Fom Shaolin

Directed by Liu Chia-Liang

Written by Ni Kuang

Hong Kong, 1976

The Shaw Brothers column is back after practically a one month absence! To get back on track in style, this week we take a look at a slightly earlier effort from one of the all-time greats, Liu Chia-liang, who is most fondly remembered for bringing fans The 36th Chamber of the Shaolin and Heroes of the East. Both of those iconic films were released in 1978, but just a couple of years prior he made Executioners from Shaolin. This is, in truth, the sequel to a Chang Cheh film from 1974, Men From the Monastery, which depicted the assault of the Shaolin temple by one of its own elders, Bai Mei (here played by Lo Lieh), who conspired with the Manchus. Both films are loosely based on historical events.

The film opens up with a very interesting scene in »

- Edgar Chaput

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The Kung Fu Grindhouse Spectacular at Webster University This Weekend

16 April 2012 7:49 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The Kung Fu And Grindhouse Spectacular in St. Louis is this weekend!

Deadly Shaolin monks, legless fighters perched atop the shoulders of armless fighters, goofy cartoon sound effects, flying guillotines, black-clad ninjas, villains with long white beards laughing with voices that don’t quite seem to match their lip movements. Welcome to ’70s Kung Fu.

Dan Halsted of Portland Oregon, has been called .The Indiana Jones of Film Archivists.. Dan is an avid collector of 35mm films with an interest in exploitation, horror and grindhouse, but Dan’s real passion is Kung Fu Cinema of the .70s. Dan is the film programmer at the Hollywood Theatre in Portland and founder of the Shaolin Film Archive, whose mission is to .save and preserve 35mm films from Hong Kong, China, Japan and Taiwan produced from the 1960.s to the 1990.s.. The archive is dedicated to presenting these films to a wide range »

- Tom Stockman

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Wamg interview – Dan Halsted of The Kung Fu Grindhouse Spectacular

9 April 2012 8:09 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Deadly Shaolin monks, legless fighters perched atop the shoulders of armless fighters, goofy cartoon sound effects, flying guillotines, black-clad ninjas, villains with long white beards laughing with voices that don.t quite seem to match their lip movements. Welcome to .70s Kung Fu. Bruce Lee may be dead, but the martial arts action films he helped popularize with American moviegoers will never die. Though Kung Fu movies were actually around long before the 1970s, emerging as a popular genre in China soon after the end of World War II, the decade of the 1970.s was the Golden Age of Martial Arts cinema, when the genre was an international phenomenon.

Dan Halsted has been called .The Indiana Jones of Film Archivists.. Dan is an avid collector of 35mm films with an interest in exploitation, horror and grindhouse, but his primary passion is Kung Fu Cinema of the .70s. Dan is the »

- Tom Stockman

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Essential Viewing for fans of ‘The Raid: Redemption’ – 15 Classic Martial Arts Films

5 April 2012 10:43 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Not long ago, Sound on Sight’s editor Ricky D emailed myself and fellow contributor Michael Ryan for the purpose of compiling some of our individual favourite martial arts pictures to celebrate The Raid‘s theatrical release across North American this Easter weekend. I would never consider myself to be a scholar of the genre, but it is true that I do tend to go back to martial arts films on a consistent basis when I have I craving for high-octane action. I think it has to do with the fact that what the performers pull off actually can be done if one practices long and hard enough. You can round-house kick someone in the face or brutally beat up a group of thugs with nunchucks but you could never levitate off the ground on bend metal with your mind, fun as it may be to watch movies in which characters perform those acts. »

- Edgar Chaput

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Essential Viewing for fans of ‘The Raid: Redemption’ – 15 Classic Martial Arts Films

5 April 2012 10:42 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The release of The Raid: Redemption has made us revisit our favourite martial arts flicks and pick five favourite films to suggest for Sound on Sight readers.

Before I give my five picks though, I would like to turn the floor over to a man who has been a friend of mine since grade seven at Oxford Street Junior High School in Halifax. As the line editor for Steve Jackson Games’ “Generic Universal RolePlaying System”, Sean Punch aka Dr. Kromm has been directly or indirectly responsible for a number of source-books on the Martial Arts including writing and editing Gurps Martial Arts.

I asked him earlier this week what films he would put on his list. He named three.

You’re not looking for goofy, cinematic Asian martial arts are you? Because I tend to like stuff that is more realistic, more like what commandos would use. You mentioned Steven Seagal »

- Michael Ryan

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Essential Viewing for fans of ‘The Raid: Redemption’ – 15 Classic Martial Arts Films

5 April 2012 10:42 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

With the release of The Raid: Redemption, I’ve asked Sound On Sight contributors Edgar Chaput and Michael Ryan to help me put together a list of 15 classic martial arts films that we consider essential viewing. Here are my five choices.

11- The Blade (Doa)

Directed by Hark Tsui

Inspired by the 1967 Shaw Brothers epic The One-Armed Swordsman, Tsui Hark’s The Blade reinforces that the director is a true innovator, a visionary, a remarkable stylist and a man who knows how to direct action. In a style often compared to Wong Kar Wai’s Ashes of Time, The Blade is a constant, steady blend of hand-held camera work, quick cuts, visual motifs, symbolic imagery and downright poetic juxtapositions. The fight scenes start out violent and blood-stained but gradually progress into grand artistic spectacles – some of the best you’ll ever see.

-

-

12- Jing wu ying xiong »

- Ricky

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The Boxer From Shantung (1972)

24 March 2012 8:19 AM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

The Boxer From Shantung is a 1972 kung fu classic, directed by the legendary Chang Cheh and Pao Hsueh Lieh and starring Chen Kuan Tai, David Chiang and Cheng Hong Yip. The action is brought to us by brothers Lau Kar leung and Lau Kar Wing and they do not disappoint.

 

Plot

Boxer From Shantung follows Ma Yongzhen and Xiao Jiangbei. Ma and Xiao are manual laborers busting their tails in Shanghai at the beginning of the film, and Ma’s first encounter with the crime lord Tan Si starts him off on the underworld influence ladder. Step by step, he earns the respect of everyone he meets, either with his strength of character or by beating them up. When he gets a really big break by defeating a Russian strongman, he indulges himself in a fancy cigarette holder, much like the one Tan Si uses. However, he is mindful of his humble beginnings, »

- kingofkungfu

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