IMDb > Val Lewton > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 32 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


First Details and Trailer for New Anthology Italian Ghost Stories

4 December 2010 2:57 PM, PST | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

This weekend we received the first word on a new anthology film coming from producer Gabriele Albanesi (The Last House in the Woods, Ubaldo Terzani Horror Show) -- Italian Ghost Stories.

The project consists of five segments helmed by a group of young first-time Italian directors as follows:

Ep.1: Offline di Andrea Gagliardi

Ep.2: Fiaba Di Un Mostro di Stefano Prolli

Ep.3: La Medium di Roberto Palma

Ep.4: 17 Novembre di Tommaso Agnese

Ep.5: Urla In Collina di Omar Protani e Marco Farina

The movie's disturbing “ghost stories” were influenced by the classic Masters of Horror such as Val Lewton, Jacques Tourneur, Robert Wise, and Jack Clayton, but they are narrated in the Italian way and visual style.

Italian Ghost Stories is being filmed entirely with the Red One Camera and stars such young Italian talents as Daniele De Angelis (What the Hell Am I Doing Here? »

- The Woman In Black

Permalink | Report a problem


International Trailer For Italian Horror Anthology Fantasmi

4 December 2010 9:39 AM, PST | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

The Last House In The Woods director Gabriele Albanesi appears determined to resuscitate Italy's once-proud horror heritage. And he's bringing some friends along for the ride.

Albanesi has just produced a five part anthology of ghost stories titled Fantasmi, the individual segments directed by a crop of young up and comers. Here's the official word.

Now available the Official Trailer of  "Italian Ghost Stories", an anthology horror movie produced by Gabriele Albanesi (The Last House in the Woods, Ubaldo Terzani Horror Show) and directed by a bunch of young first-time Italian directors: Andrea Gagliardi, Tommaso Agnese, Stefano Prolli, Roberto Palma, Omar Protani & Marco Farina.

The movie collects five disturbing "ghost-stories" under the influence of classic Masters of Horror as Val Lewton, Jacques Tourneur, Robert Wise and Jack Clayton, but narrated in the Italian way and visual style.

"Italian Ghost Stories" is entirely filmed with Red One Camera and stars young »

Permalink | Report a problem


Carnell Talks No Flesh Shall Be Spared

30 November 2010 1:53 AM, PST | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Seeking publication in today's advertisement saturated industry can be a bit like wandering into the zombie apocalypse: impossible odds, a sense of isolation, and at times it feels like everyone actually making it out there is in serious need of "braaaaaaaaaiiiiinssss."

It's an upstream swim without a doubt. But author Thom Carnell (who is a longtime contributor to both Fangoria Magazine and the Dread Central site as well as a once upon a time co-creator and writer for the much revered Carpe Noctem Magazine) is tackling both at the same time with his first novel, No Flesh Shall Be Spared (review here). Fueled by zombie-bashing carnage, the novel was released in time for Halloween of 2010.

Ck Burch for DC: Let’s start by asking you about your nom de plume. Why do you write only under your last name?

Carnell: It's really a nod to my family. So much of »

- Uncle Creepy

Permalink | Report a problem


Two new images from John Carpenter’s ‘The Ward’

19 October 2010 9:00 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

After a 9 year hiatus director John Carpenter is back with The Ward, a new horror film (that I have been salivating over since I first heard about it way back in September ‘09) starring Amber Heard (All the Boys Love Mandy Lane, Zombieland), Danielle Panabaker (Friday the 13th ‘09, The Crazies), Lyndsy Fonseca (Kick Ass, Hot Tub Time Machine) and newcomer Sali Sayler

The Ward marks a resurgence in director John Carpenter’s celebrated stylistic mojo, with his trademark prowling camera, jump scares, and the sort of atmospherics that typified The Fog and Prince of Darkness. Set in the sixties, the film’s tone and style have much in common with the works of one of horror’s great, under-recognized masters, Val Lewton, while also nodding in the direction of Samuel Fuller’s cult classic Shock Corridor.

Thanks to the folks at Horror-Infos we have two new images from the film which »

- Phil

Permalink | Report a problem


Wild Britain With Ray Mears | Spooks | A History of Horror With Mark Gatiss | Whitechapel | Tonight's TV highlights

10 October 2010 10:44 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Wild Britain With Ray Mears | Spooks | A History of Horror With Mark Gatiss | Whitechapel

Wild Britain With Ray Mears

8pm, ITV1

The survival expert heads off to various British nature spots to scrabble around in search of history and wildlife, and in this opening episode he's in the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. Originally protected as a royal hunting reserve in the 11th century, the Forest once ran amuck with wild boar. Then, 300 years ago, the last one died. Now they have been reintroduced. Mears spots a handful of them, with their piglets, on a foraging trip for the ingredients for a wild salad – but stops short of adding boar to his dinner.

Spooks

9pm, BBC1

After last week's disappointing episode, Spooks gets back on track with the tale of what happens when a Chinese snatch team arrives in London. Naturally, it's all rather complicated, principally because Section D haven't »

- Will Hodgkinson, Jonathan Wright, Phelim O'Neill, Ali Catterall, Will Dean

Permalink | Report a problem


Exclusive: Andy Fickman Gives Rko Horror Update

24 September 2010 | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Roughly two years ago, it was announced that producer/director Andy Fickman ( Race to Witch Mountain ) and Twisted Pictures, the company responsible for the "Saw" franchise, were working with Rko Pictures chairman Ted Hartley to remake four films from the Rko horror catalog, including three early films by producer Val Lewton ( The Bodysnatcher , I Walked with a Zombie and Bedlam ) and John Farrow's airplane crash survival thriller Five Came Back . Last year, ComingSoon.net talked to Fickman and gave us the scoop that Adam Marcus ( Jason Go to Hell ) would be directing the first of them, I Walked With a Zombie . Since then, we haven't heard very much about progress on either that or the other three films so when they spoke with Fickman earlier this week for his »

Permalink | Report a problem


New Images from John Carpenter’s The Ward

26 August 2010 9:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Collider have posted some new images from the upcoming horror-thriller The Ward.

Directed by John Carpenter, his first film since 2001′s Ghosts of Mars, The Ward stars Amber Heard, Lyndsy Fonseca, Jared Harris, Danielle Panabaker and Mika Boorem.

The Ward was co-written by Michael and Shawn Rasmussen, who were previously responsible for the thriller Long Distance.

John Carpenter’s horror comeback will be screened at the Toronto International Film Festival next month

The new images and synopsis are included below:

When an old farmhouse is set ablaze by Kristen (Amber Heard), a distraught young woman, she is taken by police to the North Bend Psychiatric Hospital. She awakens in a special ward with four similarly unbalanced and wayward girls: Sarah, a flirty and sass-talking know it all; Iris, a sensitive and talented artist who tries to make her feel welcome; Emily, a reckless but playful outcast; and Zoey, who hides »

- Jamie Neish

Permalink | Report a problem


First Look: John Carpenter’s The Ward

26 August 2010 7:36 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Hat-tip goes to CinemaBlend for this first look at “Master of Horror” John Carpenter’s The Ward. The 3 photos originally appeared on the Toronto International Film Festival’s website. Additional ones also appeared on the film’s Facebook page.

Tiff’s Description:

When an old farmhouse is set ablaze by Kristen (Amber Heard), a distraught young woman, she is taken by police to the North Bend Psychiatric Hospital. She awakens in a special ward with four similarly unbalanced and wayward girls: Sarah, a flirty and sass-talking know it all; Iris, a sensitive and talented artist who tries to make her feel welcome; Emily, a reckless but playful outcast; and Zoey, who hides behind a childlike persona and her beloved stuffed bunny.

Kirsten.s therapist, Dr. Stringer (Jared Harris), tries to uncover the root cause of her breakdown, but despite his calm and understanding manner, she resists any attempts at help and rehabilitation. »

- Michelle McCue

Permalink | Report a problem


First Images from The Ward and Beautiful Boy

25 August 2010 2:53 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Continuing our first-look image series of movies playing at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, we have images from John Carpenter’s The Ward starring Amber Heard, Mamie Gummer, Danielle Panabaker, Jared Harris, and Lyndsy FonsecaThe Ward is Carpenter’s first film in over a decade and that alone is reason enough to see it. We also have images from Shawn Ku’s Beautiful Boy, which has a killer cast that includes Michael Sheen, Maria Bello, Moon Bloodgood, Alan Tudyk, Kyle Gallner, Austin Nichols, and Meat Loaf Aday.

Hit the jump to check out all the images and synopses for both films.  The 2010 Toronto International Film Festival runs from September 9 – 19th.

And if you missed our previous first look images articles, here’s a few links:

Malcolm Venville’s Henry’s Crime and Mike Goldbach’s Daydream Nation Mike Mills Beginners and Rowan Joffe’s Brighton Rock Guy Moshe »

- Matt Goldberg

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff to premiere John Carpenter’s ‘The Ward’

18 August 2010 8:15 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

After a 9 year hiatus director John Carpenter is back with The Ward, a new horror film that I have been salivating over since I first heard about it way back in September 2009. Starring Amber Heard (All the Boys Love Mandy Lane, Zombieland), Danielle Panabaker (Friday the 13th ‘09, The Crazies), Lyndsy Fonseca (Kick Ass, Hot Tub Time Machine) and newcomer Sali Sayler.

As if my excitement for the film wasn’t already enough, check out this Amazing description of the film by the organisers of Tiff 2010:

The Ward marks a resurgence in director John Carpenter’s celebrated stylistic mojo, with his trademark prowling camera, jump scares, and the sort of atmospherics that typified The Fog and Prince of Darkness.

Set in the sixties, the film’s tone and style have much in common with the works of one of horror’s great, under-recognized masters, Val Lewton, while also nodding in »

- Phil

Permalink | Report a problem


Black Narcissus Criterion Blu-ray Review

10 August 2010 7:01 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

The Brits are best known for Merchant/Ivory-type films – adaptations of classic novels, Shakespeare, class. This is ironic for a number of reasons, perhaps most notably because neither Merchant nor Ivory are British. Though it might be fair to say that a number of the great British directors weren’t sensualists, but even there if you watch the films of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, there is great passion, and great sensuality. Powell and Pressburger’s Black Narcissus practically drips with under the surface eroticism. Deborah Kerr stars as a nun sent to the Himalayas to start a school, but once there she fights against the environment to stay in control of her fellow nuns and herself. My review of Criterion’s Blu-ray of Black Narcissus after the jump.

When a rich general gives a large temple in the Himalayas to an English nunnery, five nuns are sent to colonize it and assist the locals. »

- Andre Dellamorte

Permalink | Report a problem


Total Recall: Kurt's Inception Review

17 July 2010 2:15 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Because Leonardo DiCaprio is now making it a habit of playing damaged characters with all the answers and none of them (simultaneously) it is difficult not to look at Inception without it bringing to mind Shutter Island (and a touch of Revolutionary Road.)  There is even twin scenes of a rattled and ill DiCaprio leaning into a sink and splashing water on his face to either steel his nerves or wake from the nightmare.  Whereas Scorsese moulded his film on the noirish Val Lewton films from the 1940s with Gothic sets, character driven and macabre imagery, Christopher Nolan is building off the new millennium blockbuster of the Wachowskis, Michael Mann and Michael Bay.  While he certainly adds a lot more brains to the proceedings, the film is all steel and glass and clean geometric lines.   Nolan as a screenwriter is not above the classical mythology name-dropping (Ellen Page's dream »

Permalink | Report a problem


At the Cinematheque: "Nightfall" (Jacques Tourneur, 1957)

9 June 2010 7:10 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: L.A. noir—Rudy Bond, a .45, Aldo Ray, and an oil derrick.

Jacques Tourneur, one of old Hollywood's last poets, seems forever known, when know at all, for pairing his nebulous, poetic clashes between rationality and irrationality with the inspired clouds of unease of producer Val Lewton's wartime productions in such films as Cat People (1942), The Leopard Man (1943), and I Walked With a Zombie (also 43), and for one of the most unsusal and foggy noirs—and canonical films—ever produced, Out of the Past (1947).  In the 1950s Tourneur's products grew more erratic, though masterpieces were frequent—ranging frmo the beginning of the decade with the genuine warmth of his good-hearted Western, Stars in My Crown (1950), to the end, with a return to scientific-materialist horror in the British production Night of the Demon (1957)—and frequently uncanny and haunting in that way so specific to Tourneur, where memories of his »

Permalink | Report a problem


April 17-May 2 at the American Cinematheque

16 April 2010 11:08 AM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

The rest of this month has some exciting genre output on display at the wonderful Egyptian and Aero Theatres, hosted by the American Cinematheque.

Currently running, the Egyptian’s Lust and Larceny: Noir City, the 12th Annual Festival of Film Noir will wrap up on April 18. Friday, April 16 beginning at 7:30pm will be a double feature of 1955’s thriller Crashout, followed by 1954’s brutal revenge melodrama Cry Vengeance. Neither of these films are currently available on DVD. Saturday will see a double feature of horror director Lew Landers’ The Power of the Whistler from 1945 and starring Richard Dix (Val Lewton’s The Ghost Ship), as well as its follow up of the same year, Voice of the Whistler, directed by horror legend William Castle! In attendence will be Robert Dix, son of star Richard Dix.

Running from April 29 through May 2, the Egyptian presents A Wrinkle in Time: The Best of Time Travel Films. »

- Jesse

Permalink | Report a problem


The Forgotten: Remember You Must Die

8 April 2010 6:07 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"It's hard for people our age to think about dying. Perhaps we should have got into the habit when we were young."

A dissolve from the dial of an old-fashioned clock to the dial of an old-fashioned telephone.

When Val Lewton was preparing Isle of the Dead, one of his grimmest and most poetic horror films, an Rko executive reminded him that the studio had decided that its films should not have messages. "I'm sorry to say that your film does have a message," Lewton said, "and the message is, 'Death is Good.'"

In this light, Jack Clayton's final film, Memento Mori, can be seen as an exercise in redundancy, since it helpfully includes it's message in the title, for anyone with the classical background to understand it. But of course a message is not, or should not, be the whole point of a movie. Those much derided »

Permalink | Report a problem


Rondo Nominee: The Most “Famous Monster” of Them All

2 April 2010 9:01 AM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

FamousMonsters.com is pleased and honored to re-present Steve Vertlieb’s touching tribute to our dear departed Forrest J Ackerman. We’re also very happy to report that Steve’s story is a finalist in this year’s Rondo Awards! Please visit the official Rondo Awards site for the chance to cast your ballot for this and many other outstanding nominees. Also, be sure to check out The Thunder Child, where Steve’s story originally ran.

The Most “Famous Monster” Of Them All

A Personal Remembrance of Forrest J Ackerman

by Steve Vertlieb

In a child-like land of dreams and dragons dwelt a Pied Piper of imagination, a Santa Claus of fantasy and horror, who lived in the mythical kingdom of Horrorweird, Karloffornia. His name was Forrest J Ackerman but, to his friends and colleagues, he was simply “Forry.”

A generation of wide- eyed children grew up under the spell »

- Michael

Permalink | Report a problem


Remembering Horror Maestro Curtis Harrington

31 March 2010 11:24 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Filmmaker Curtis Harrington: 1926-2007.

Our Friend Curtis Harrington

by Jon Zelazny

Curtis Harrington was born in Los Angeles in 1926. He made short films as a teenager, graduated from USC, and began his Hollywood career in the 1950’s. By the end of the decade, he was directing: independent films, studio pictures, made-for-tv movies, and episodic TV. He completed his last short film in 2002, and died in 2007 at the age of 80.

I knew Curtis well in his final years, as did writer-producer Dennis Bartok, the former head programmer of L.A.’s famed American Cinematheque.

Dennis Bartok: I think the most interesting aspect of Curtis’s career is that he was really the only filmmaker to successfully transition from the avant-garde scene of the late 1940’s to directing Hollywood feature films. And when you see how distinctive his movies are, you wish he could’ve made more… but when you »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


A History of the American B-movie: The 40s and 50s

22 March 2010 10:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our look back at the history of the American B-movie takes in the 40s and 50s, which saw the emergence of Mr Roger Corman...

"From Out of Space... A Warning and An Ultimatum!" Tagline for The Day The Earth Stood Still (Robert Wise, 1951)

The term B-movie is perhaps most synonymous with the 40s and 50s era of Hollywood. At this stage the label was sometimes used as derogatory slang for cheapo movies with stale dialogue, unknown actors and old sets. But most movie lovers remember something magical about these classics. Whether it's watching Cat People when you were a kid, or Ed Wood's hilarious cult oddities as a teenager, they stay with you forever.

Rko were renowned for their horrors around this time, thanks to screen writer and producer Val Lewton. His production team made the aforementioned Cat People (1942), as well as I Walked With A Zombie (1943) and Stranger On The Third Floor »

Permalink | Report a problem


Shutter Island | Film review

13 March 2010 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Scorsese triumphs with a powerful noir pastiche that sends Leonardo DiCaprio into a world of madness and paranoia

Susan Sontag greeted the centenary of the cinema with an essay proclaiming its "ignominious, irreversible decline". She added that "the commercial cinema has settled for a policy of bloated, derivative film-making… every film that hopes to reach the highest possible audience is designed as some kind of remake". How does that sound 15 years later? Well, the two most striking films this week, Shutter Island and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and the one we're most looking forward to next month, Polanski's The Ghost, all centre on troubled protagonists lured to remote islands to investigate disappearances and past mysteries that threaten their lives. Is this chance, the mythic underpinning of narrative, or cultural exhaustion?

Having made this pious observation, let me declare that Shutter Island, adapted by Laeta Kalogridis from Dennis Lehane »

- Philip French

Permalink | Report a problem


Is Scorsese's Shutter Island heading for the rocks?

5 March 2010 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Film-makers, beware of islands, warns John Patterson. Many an ambitious movie has foundered on their shores. Could Scorsese's be next?

Next week at the movies it's islands, islands, islands, all the livelong day. Don't they know that islands make for terrible movies? That islands are where great scripts go to get shipwrecked? Have they never seen Peter Benchley's The Island? Or Michael Bay's? Has anyone else noticed how dejected they suddenly feel whenever Lost cuts back to the island once again? (Am I the only one sickened by all that livid green foliage?) And have the calamitous production history of The Island Of Dr Moreau and the dread lessons it should have taught us already faded from the folk memory of filmland? Chappaquiddick? Okinawa? Krakatoa? The Camp On Blood Island? Nothing good ever came from an island. Give me an isthmus or a peninsula any day.

Apparently it's »

- John Patterson

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 32 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners