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2017 | 2016 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

5 items from 2017


Cannes: ‘Rotterdam’ and ‘Berlin, I Love You’ Films to Shoot This Summer

20 May 2017 10:15 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Rotterdam, I Love You” and “Berlin, I Love You,” the latest two film in the Cities of Love franchise, will shoot this summer. Both aim to be ready for the major festivals in their home cities in early 2018.

Mike Figgis, Claire Denis, Pablo Trapero and John Maybury are among the international directors joining local Dutch filmmakers Martin Koolhoven, Paula van der Oest, Joost van Ginkel, Koen Mortier, new voices Barry Atsma and Shariff Nasr, and previously announced Atom Egoyan on the anthology film.

The production was announced at the Cannes Film Festival by producers Matt Jaems and Joeri Pruys. The film has 11 connected segments plus interstitial material and will start shooting July 18.

The Berlin film, shooting in June, involves Patrick Dempsey and Renee Zellweger making their directorial debuts alongside Massy Tadjedin, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, Shekhar KapurTom Van Avermaet and Fernando Eimbcke, Til Schweiger, Dennis Gansel and Dani Levy. »

- Patrick Frater

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Maria Schrader Talks Exile and Inner Turmoil in “Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe”

11 May 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe”: Dor Film

One of Germany’s most acclaimed actresses, Maria Schrader is a two-time winner of the German Film award and two-time winner of the Bavarian Film award. At the 1999 Berlinale she received the Silver Bear for Best Actress in “Aimée & Jaguar,” a hit in the U.S. and around the world. Schrader’s directorial debut, “Love Life,” was based on Zeruya Shalev’s novel by the same title and shot in Israel. She co-directed “The Giraffe” with Dani Levy. Schrader was nominated for Best Director at the German Film Awards last year.

Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe” will open in New York May 12.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Ms: The movie is about six episodes in the life of the Austrian Jewish writer and pacifist Stefan Zweig during his years in exile. He was one of the most renowned European writers and refugees during the WWII. He was a superstar of his time, persecuted by the Nazis and welcomed as a statesman in every other part of the world.

The movie takes place in Buenos Aires, New York City, and Brazil. Zweig killed himself in Brazil in 1942. It’s a movie about exile, and about the inner turmoil of having escaped while millions of others are fighting for their lives back home. It’s also a movie about Europe, even though Europe is never seen.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Ms: Stefan Zweig found secure refuge in a tropical paradise in Brazil. He was financially protected and happily married. His suicide shocked the world. Thomas Mann, among many others, condemned him for sending the wrong message of resignation, for bestowing such triumph on the Nazis. But this is just one way to look at it.

I was intrigued by all the questions that arouse from such a disturbingly consequential decision. How can you cope with a world that turns into radicalism? How do you cope as an artist? Is there something more valuable than [physical] security and personal happiness?

Zweig’s greatest gifts as a writer — his fantasy and empathy — transformed from being a blessing into a curse: He couldn’t go on while, on the other side of the world, Europe was going up in flames. He couldn’t distance himself from the pain of others. Is it weakness? Is it a pacifist’s ultimate act of resistance? Is it maybe the real heart of humanity?

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Ms: Cruelty and beauty. Tenderness and colors. The heat and the cold. How big the world is. How beautiful it is to be alive. How many details there are to discover, how many shades between black and white, how many words between yes and no.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Ms: Getting it done with half of the estimated budget. Finding the best 85 actors. Convincing the producers to not shoot in English but in five different languages. It was also difficult to push São Tomé through to be the main location — a small African island in the Gulf of Guinea, a virgin territory in terms of movies, one flight a week, no stable electricity, no infrastructure at all. But the most stunning landscapes, and the most wonderful people — just the greatest gift for this film.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Ms: It’s a co-production among Austria, Germany, and France. A Portuguese company was hired to execute the shoot on São Tomé — the island is a former Portuguese colony. The film is financed by both state and regional funds as well as television stations from all three co-production countries. We were a multinational team, with various languages being used on set. It was an enriching experience for everyone involved. We shot in 26 days.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Ms: Best advice: When there’s no time, slow down.

Worst advice: Don’t ever wear a skirt on set.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Ms: Wear whatever you like. No disguise. Any cover will blow during shooting.

Cast your team members yourself. If the presence of someone around is discomforting, it might harm your artistic freedom. Your own doubts are enough to carry: You don’t need anyone else’s mistrust.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Ms: I like a lot of films by female directors. I discovered Lina Wertmuller’s “Love and Anarchy” at a very young age. I saw it many times and still admire the film. But I don’t divide films in gender categories.

W&H: Have you seen opportunities for women filmmakers increase over the last year due to the increased attention paid to the issue? If someone asked you what you thought needed to be done to get women more opportunities to direct, what would be your answer?

Ms: Opportunities have definitely increased. In various European countries the demand for a higher female quota among directors has been promoted with a lot of effort throughout the last years. The changes are recognizable. But I am afraid this battle has to continue for at least a few more years.

https://medium.com/media/209e34563de349b05dda7d034e58c7e1/href

Maria Schrader Talks Exile and Inner Turmoil in “Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Germany’s Beta Film and Tom Tykwer’s X Filme Partner Up

9 February 2017 5:20 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Berlin-based X Filme is restructuring its operations and partnering with Jan Mojto’s Beta Film on a new division, X Filme Holding GmbH, that will oversee development, production, distribution and sales.

The new unit will be headed by X Filme’s Stefan Arndt, Uwe Schott and Andreas Brey, who joins from Dz Bank. Brey will also be responsible for finances and business development in particular. “The move is an effort to “adjust to the increasingly complex audiovisual industry,” the company said.

“In partnering up with Beta Film, X Filme will profit even more from the interlocking of production and national and international sales,” Schott and Brey said in a joint statement. “We are very happy that, together with Beta, we will be able to further position and establish German filmmaking with national and international productions on the national and international market as a force in the industry to be reckoned with. »

- Ed Meza

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Berlin: Beta Film Takes Stake in Tom Tykwer's X Filme

9 February 2017 5:01 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

German sales and production group Beta Film (Babylon Berlin) will take a strategic stake in X Filme, the German production and distribution company behind Run Lola Run, Cloud Atlas and Good Bye Lenin!

X Filme, founded in 1994 by producer Stefan Arndt and directors Tom Tykwer, Wolfgang Becker and Dani Levy, will be restructured to merge all production, distribution and sales operations under a single entity, X Filme Holding. Beta will become a strategic partner in X Filme Holding.

Beta teamed with X Filme on Tom Tykwer's upcoming TV series Babylon Berlin, with Beta co-financing and handling international sales on »

- Scott Roxborough

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Berlin: Beta Film Takes Stake in Tom Tykwer's X Filme

9 February 2017 5:01 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

German sales and production group Beta Film (Babylon Berlin) will take a strategic stake in X Filme, the German production and distribution company behind Run Lola Run, Cloud Atlas and Good Bye Lenin!

X Filme, founded in 1994 by producer Stefan Arndt and directors Tom Tykwer, Wolfgang Becker and Dani Levy, will be restructured to merge all production, distribution and sales operations under a single entity, X Filme Holding. Beta will become a strategic partner in X Filme Holding.

Beta teamed with X Filme on Tom Tykwer's upcoming TV series Babylon Berlin, with Beta co-financing and handling international sales on »

- Scott Roxborough

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

5 items from 2017


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