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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 31 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


French Writers and Producers Guild Condemns Harvey Weinstein

16 October 2017 11:18 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The heavyweights of the French film industry condemned Harvey Weinstein in a statement issued Monday, with The Artist director Michel Hazanvicius, Intouchables helmers Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano and veteran filmmakers Claude Lelouch and Costa Gavras signing a letter from Arp, the producers, directors and writers guild.

Titling it “Acts Unworthy,” the guild wrote: “The filmmakers of Arp join together in the unequivocal condemnation of Harvey Weinstein, after the revelations about him.”

The guild called the allegations of years of sexual harassment and assault “shameful and unacceptable.”

It continued: “We express our solidarity with the women assaulted and humiliated in »

- Rhonda Richford

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Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of the 5th New York Film Festival

12 October 2017 6:55 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: Polish poster for The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, Italy/Algeria, 1965). Designer: Jerzy Flisak.As the 55th New York Film Festival winds down this weekend, I thought I’d look back half a century at the films of the 5th edition. That 1967 festival, programmed by Amos Vogel, Richard Roud, Arthur Knight, Andrew Sarris and Susan Sontag, featured 21 new films, all but three of which were from Europe (six of them from France, 2 and 1/7 of them directed by Godard), all of which showed at Lincoln Center’s Philharmonic Hall. (They also programmed Gance’s Napoleon, Mamoulian’s Applause and King Vidor’s Show People in the retrospective slots). The only director to have a film in both the 1967 festival and the 2017 edition is Agnès Varda, who was one of the directors of the omnibus Far From Vietnam and was then already 12 years into her filmmaking career.It will come as »

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Criterion Collection Announces December Titles, Including ‘Election’ and ‘Monterey Pop’

15 September 2017 3:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Criterion Collection has unveiled its holiday slate, with “Election” leading the list of titles being released this December. Joining Alexander Payne’s classic in the Collection are a new digital transfer of Barbet Schroeder’s documentary “General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait,” “The Complete Monterey Pop Festival,” and the previously announced “100 Years of Olympic Films 1912-2012.” More information — and, just as importantly, cover art — below:

Read More:Criterion Collection Announces November Titles, Including Seminal Lesbian Drama ‘Desert Hearts’ and ‘The Philadelphia Story

Election

“Perky, overachieving Tracy Flick (Reese Witherspoon) gets on the nerves of history teacher Jim McAllister (Matthew Broderick) to begin with, but after she launches her campaign for high-school president and his personal life starts to fall apart, things spiral out of control. In Alexander Payne’s satire ‘Election,’ the teacher becomes unhealthily obsessed with cutting his student down to size, covertly backing a spoiler candidate to »

- Michael Nordine

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Why Jeanne Moreau’s Death Represents the Decline of French Film in America

4 August 2017 1:47 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Iconic actress Jeanne Moreau’s death this week at 89 received muted American coverage, with remembrances that hardly captured Moreau’s essential presence and influence in world cinema. Overshadowed by the passing of Sam Shepard the day before (more contemporary, American, prominent in multiple fields, and younger), she received back-page obituaries in major papers. Her lack of any Oscar nominations, or a deserved honorary award, didn’t help the cause.

Even more unfortunate is the treatment of her death reflects American audiences’ ever-increasing disinterest in French-language film. Jeanne Moreau is significant for her transcendent artistry and the directors with whom she worked, but she also represented the iconic qualities of her country’s cinema.

Though the boom in “art houses” (a term popularized in the late 1940s) came more from Italian films (“Rome, Open City,” “Shoe Shine,” and particularly “Bicycle Thief”), French film became a steady part of the subtitled market by the mid-1950s. »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Film Review: Bertrand Tavernier’s ‘My Journey Through French Cinema’

23 June 2017 10:37 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whether you already consider yourself an expert on French cinema or are just beginning to explore all the country has to offer, director Bertrand Tavernier’s more-than-three-hour “My Journey Through French Cinema” provides an essential tour through the films that shaped him as a cinephile and storyteller. Clearly modeled after Martin Scorsese’s own made-for-tv journey through American Movies, this incredibly personal and occasionally idiosyncratic labor of love hails from one of the country’s leading experts on the medium, combining a wide-ranging survey with insights that only Tavernier could provide.

A celebrated helmer in his own right, Tavernier counts such masterworks as “A Sunday in the Country” and “Coup de torchon” among his credits. But the director’s contributions to the medium are hardly limited to his own filmography. Like so many French directors of his generation, Tavernier started out as a film critic, studying and championing the work of the era’s leading auteurs. His »

- Peter Debruge

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80 top film-makers sound alarm over EU copyright rules

22 May 2017 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors »

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80 top film-makers demand changes to EU copyright rules

22 May 2017 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors »

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Cannes: Omar Sy, Luis Guzman Team Up for Action Comedy 'Belleville Cop'

18 May 2017 4:08 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Omar Sy and Luis Guzman are heading up an international cast for Rachid Bouchareb's action comedy Belleville Cop for Lionsgate.

The Intouchables and Jurassic World star is joined by Luis Guzman (Keanu, We’re the Millers), Algerian actress Biyouna, Cesar-nominated French actress Julie Ferrier (Heartbreaker, Claude Lelouch’s Everyone’s Life), French actor Franck Gastambide and Diem Ngyen. Lionsgate will introduce Belleville Cop, which it is dubbing a multi-language film, to foreign buyers at the Cannes market (the dialogue is a mix of French, English and Spanish).

Sy plays Baaba Keita, who has built his whole life in the working-class Paris neighborhood of »

- Tatiana Siegel

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WestEnd boards Claude Lelouch-Jean Dujardin comedy

16 May 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Sales deal for comedy-drama Chacun Sa Vie.

WestEnd Films has boarded world sales to Claude Lelouch’s Everyone’s Life (Chacun Sa Vie), starring Oscar-winner Jean Dujardin and rock star Johnny Hallyday.

The film celebrates Oscar and Palme d’Or-winner Lelouch’s 50-year cinema career with a cast of A-list French actors, in a feel good comedy about 12 men and 12 women who face romantic complications in the Burgundy wine-country town of Beaune, during its annual jazz festival.

The film is produced by Lelouch for Films 13 and Samuel Hadida and Victor Hadida for Davis Films (Resident Evil).

The film was released in France in late March by Samuel and Victor Hadida’s Metropolitan Filmexport, which also holds French rights to the film.

In addition to Dujardin and Hallyday, the cast also includes Béatrice Dalle, Mathilde Seigner, Christophe Lambert, Deborah François, Elsa Zylberstein and Eric Dupond-Moretti .

WestEnd will begin world sales at the market in Cannes, where it will »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Here in my car by Anne-Katrin Titze

16 May 2017 10:43 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Claude Lelouch on Howard Hawks's Bringing Up Baby and his own La Bonne Année as films to watch to cheer you up: "Very good choices!" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Cannes Film Festival is gearing up for tomorrow's opening night screening of Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael’s Ghosts (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël) starring Mathieu Amalric, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Marion Cotillard with Louis Garrel and Alba Rohrwacher, and a score by Grégoire Hetzel. Claude Lelouch with Un Homme Et Une Femme, starring Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant, in 1966 had won Palme d'Or honours and with Pierre Uytterhoeven, a Best Screenplay Oscar.

Mr and Mrs Gallois (Charles Denner and Judith Magre) with Simon (Jean‑Louis Trintignant) in Le Voyou: "One must learn how to detect cheaters."

Driving with Fanny Ardant, Dominique Pinon, and Audrey Dana in Roman De Gare, Abbas Kiarostami and cars, Un + Une in India with Jean Dujardin and Elsa Zylberstein, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Cannes Confronts the Age of Trump, Brexit, and Isis

16 May 2017 6:15 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Cannes Film Festival, for all its moneyed bustle and aristocratic glitz, represents something grand and orderly in the world of cinema. The ritual promenades taken by movie stars and directors along the red carpet are as stately as papal processions. The carpet itself, with its 22 steps leading up to the Grand Theatre Lumiere, symbolizes more than celebrity — it’s an artistic stairway to Heaven. The whole spectacle is saturated in reverence, awe and old-meets-new tradition.

Given that, it takes a lot to roil the Cannes Film Festival. Yet this year, as the fortnight approaches, there’s a sense that Cannes could be like a castle built on storm-tossed seas — subject to the turbulence of everything happening in the world around it. The election of Donald Trump and the early months of an administration that so many have viewed with unprecedented alarm.

The fracture in the edifice of Europe that was, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Film Review: ‘Everyone’s Life’ (Chacun sa vie)

3 May 2017 6:58 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As far as late-career ruts go, Claude Lelouch has carved out one of the most comfortable, reliably crafting languid, tonally unpredictable slices of haute-bourgeois French life like a more anarchic Garry Marshall. For his 46th feature, “Everyone’s Life” (Chacun sa vie), Lelouch takes a cue from Marshall’s trio of multi-character omnibus projects, recruiting an even starrier than usual troupe of top-tier Gallic actors for a rambling outing in the Burgundy wine-country town of Beaune, and the change of scenery brings out both his best and worst instincts.

Spotlighting a dozen barely-written characters who face romantic complications during Beaune’s annual jazz festival, “Everyone’s Life” contains a few of the most effective individual scenes in the director’s recent filmography, as well as some of the most befuddling. At moments, the film passes as breezily as an afternoon nap after quaffing a bit of the region’s vintages »

- Andrew Barker

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Everybody’s Life | 2017 Colcoa French Film Festival Review

28 April 2017 1:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Au Beaune Pain: Lelouch Continues with Frivolous Comedy Spackle

Somewhere along the way Palme d’Or and Oscar winning auteur Claude Lelouch (1966’s A Man and a Woman) morphed into the Garry Marshall of French film, churning out vapid comedy vehicles sporting a glitzy array of notable Gallic stars. Whenever the slide began, his tendencies to overstuff his narratives with zany layers of (often inconsequential) tangential sub-plotting began years ago, look no further than his 1986 sequel to his most famous film, A Man and a Woman: 20 Years Later for longstanding evidence of the change. His later period reflects the stamp of various muses, such as actress Audrey Dana, and now, frequent co-author Valerie Perrin. With 2013’s We Love You, You Bastard and 2015’s Un + Une, Lelouch has become completely divorced from his illustrious past filmography, a chasm only widened by his latest venture, Everybody’s Life, once more featuring Johnny Hallyday and Jean Dujardin amongst a cavalcade of a cast, all whirling through this odd kitchen sink array of miscellaneous characters all inclined to converse about their Zodiac signs as they fall in and out of romantic love or obsessive yearning during a a year’s time in Beaune, France.

As an annual jazz festival gets underway, a slew of characters intersect and coverage in the provincial town of Beaune in the Burgundy region. A judge (Eric Dupond-Moretti) must contend with the news of Clementine’s (Beatrice Dalle) retirement, a local prostitute whose company has brought him great joy since the death of his wife. Meanwhile, his colleague Nathalie (Julie Ferrier) falls out of a window after finding her husband (Gerard Darmon) with another man, sharing an ambulance with a hypochondriac singer (Mathilde Seigner) who believes she is having a heart attack following a performance at the festival. At the same time, a tawdry court case has drawn together another subsection of the community, including the troubled alcoholic Antoine (Christophe Lambert), currently facing the dissolution of his own marriage with his disconsolate wife (Marianne Denicourt) betwixt legal troubles. And as famed singer Johnny Hallyday faces a problem with a slippery doppelganger (who has a tryst with an unhappily married Comtesse played by Elsa Zylberstein, married to Vincent Perez), which causes some confusion with local cop Jean (Jean Dujardin), the marriage between former beauty queen (Nadia Fares) and Stephane (Stephane De Groodt) is also on the rocks. Meanwhile, the local hospital has decided to engage a new policy wherein patients must be put at ease through sexually provocative jokes, which brings a chummy nurse (Deborah Francois) into contact with several patients.

If Max Ophuls had wanted to make La Ronde (1950) into a relationship farce (to be fair, Roger Vadim kind of did this with his remake) set to light jazz, it might look something like Everybody’s Life. However, Lelouch feels as if he filmed his illustrious cast in a number of amusing scenarios and pasted the end results together as he saw fit, clipping it into a semblance of repeated scenarios with revolving characters, all who end up professing their love, being destroyed by it, or simply moving on to another chapter. However, the film is neither subtle nor diverse in its repetitive techniques, and for as entertaining as it is to see Hallyday and Dujardin horse around as they take selfies, the frivolousness quickly gets wearying, particularly by its grand framed finale, where we return to the court room a year later after the film’s beginning, with Lelouch stuffing all his characters, whether it makes sense or not, into the same room.

Gregoire Lacroix assists Perrin, Pierre Uytterhoeven (who co-wrote A Man and a Woman) and Lelouch in this adaptation from his own prose, but Everybody’s Life drifts aimlessly, as if besotted by the presence of its own unlucky in love characters all experiencing the same approximation of discontent. Most of these formulas are tedious, if not forgettable, with a glaring bright spot from Beatrice Dalle as a prostitute who wants nothing more to do with sex or men and relish the retirement she deserves. If somewhat less ungainly than rom-com Un+Une and the loopy We Love You, You Bastard, this isn’t a return to form or an ascension to new heights for Lelouch, try as it might to ‘experiment’ with traditional narrative form.

Reviewed on April 24th at the 2017 Colcoa French Film Festival – Opening Night Film. 113 Mins.

★★½/☆☆☆☆☆

The post Everybody’s Life | 2017 Colcoa French Film Festival Review appeared first on Ioncinema.com. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Springtime in L.A.: Colcoa

20 April 2017 11:50 AM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

City of Lights: City of Angeles. The largest French film festival in the world and one of the largest festivals in L.A.!

Colcoa French Film Festival, “9 Days of Premieres in Hollywood” takes place April 24 to May 2 in the prestigious theaters of the Directors Guild of America on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood (3 theaters (600, 160 and 37 seats), a 210 capacity lounge and a 1,500 capacity lobby).

Colcoa is the acronym of “City of Light, City of Angels” the original name of an event celebrating relationships between filmmakers from two capital cities of cinema. In 2015, the festival’s name was officially changed to Colcoa French Film Festival. Colcoa was founded in 1997 by The Franco-American Cultural Fund, a unique collaborative effort of the Directors Guild of America, the Motion Picture Association, the Writers Guild of America West, and France’s Society of Authors Composers and Publishers of Music (Sacem). Colcoa is also supported by l’Association »

- Sydney Levine

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Colcoa Film Fest’s 21st Edition Fetes American-French Connection

20 April 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In Hollywood, there’s an oft-debated version of the eternal “chicken and egg” question: Who first made cinema, the United States or France?

Jean-Noel Tronc, president of the Franco-American Cultural Fund, doesn’t dare wade into the debate. And it doesn’t matter which nation gets credit for inventing the movies, he says, because at the Colcoa Film Festival, which, for the past two decades has taken pride in presenting French film, television and web content to American audiences, the world’s two greatest cinematic powers are combining forces for the greater good.

“France and America have contributed, more than any other countries in the world, not only to the creation of cinema but also the transformation of cinema as an art and as an industry,” Tronc says.

Colcoa — whose name, acronymic for City of Lights, City of Angels, is an ode to the world’s two great cinema cultures »

- Debra Kamin

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Frémaux spills the beans on Cannes Official Selection process

12 April 2017 1:08 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Cannes will be tying up the line-up until late into the night, according to Frémaux’s recent book.

With less than 24 hours to go until the Cannes Film Festival unveils the Official Selection of its 70th edition (May 17-28) speculation is building.

The eve of the announcement is a decisive day for the festival as it ties-up the loose ends of it line-up. 

Cannes delegate general Thierry Frémaux and the rest of his selection and press team will be lockdown at the festival’s rue Amélie offices in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower.

Frémaux describes today as the “day of all dangers”, in his recent book, Sélection Officielle (pictured, right), a blow-by-blow account of how the 2016 selection came together over the course of a year.

“There are still films to be seen and decisions to be taken, some will be delicate: establishing a selection is not an exact science,” writes Frémaux »

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Thierry Frémaux spills the beans on Cannes Official Selection

12 April 2017 1:08 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Cannes will be tying up the line-up until late into the night, according to Frémaux’s recent book.

With less than 24 hours to go until the Cannes Film Festival unveils the Official Selection of its 70th edition (May 17-28) speculation is building.

The eve of the announcement is a decisive day for the festival as it ties-up the loose ends of it line-up. 

Cannes delegate general Thierry Frémaux and the rest of his selection and press team will be lockdown at the festival’s rue Amélie offices in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower.

Frémaux describes today as the “day of all dangers”, in his recent book, Sélection Officielle (pictured, right), a blow-by-blow account of how the 2016 selection came together over the course of a year.

“There are still films to be seen and decisions to be taken, some will be delicate: establishing a selection is not an exact science,” writes Frémaux »

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Sheffield Doc/Fest to Open With World Premiere of ‘Queerama’

6 April 2017 10:05 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The 24th Sheffield Doc/Fest will open with the world premiere of Daisy Asquith’s “Queerama,” in keeping with the festival’s themes this year of resistance and change.

“This year at Doc/Fest we have our most urgent and loudest call to action to join the groundswell movements of resistance and change, where we celebrate those who disobey and resist to shape the future global narrative,” said Liz McIntyre, the festival’s CEO and director. “We’re stepping into the early scenes of a tragicomic new world story.”

Britain’s leading documentary festival, Sheffield Doc/Fest runs from June 9-14. Its official program launch will be on May 3,

Marking the 50th anniversary of Britain’s landmark Sexual Offenses Act, which decriminalized private homosexual acts in England and Wales, “Queerama” will be followed by a live performance by U.S. singer-songwriter John Grant, whose music features in the film. The documentary, »

- Robert Mitchell

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21st Colcoa French Film Festival Adds Vr and Web Series Categories, Unveils Full Expanded Festival Slate

6 April 2017 7:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Colcoa is keeping up with the times. Now in its twenty-first year, the lauded French film festival, sponsored by the Franco-American Cultural Fund, has added a pair of forward-thinking new categories for its newest edition. This year will include a virtual reality program and a web series competition, in addition to its Cinema, Television and Shorts competitions.

“These two new popular formats offer more opportunities to showcase the creativity of French producers and filmmakers as well as the diversity of French production,” said François Truffart, Colcoa Executive Producer and Artistic Director. “While entertainment is still the key word for the program, with a balanced mix of comedies and dramas, several topical issues will cover the program this year, including the environment, discrimination, racism, terrorism, and the role of the artist in society. More than ever, Colcoa will offer a unique opportunity to see these universal topics from different angles.”

Read »

- Kate Erbland

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Colcoa French Film Festival Opens With Claude Lelouch’s ‘Everyone’s Life’

4 April 2017 6:30 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Claude Lelouch’s “Everyone’s Life” will open the 21st Colcoa French Film Festival on April 24.

“Everyone’s Life” (Chacun sa vie), a North American premiere, celebrates 50 years of cinema with cast of 50 French actors, including Johnny Hallyday and Academy Award winner Jean Dujardin.

The festival, which will be held at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles, will showcase a record 82 films, television series and, for the first time, web series. A total of 70 of these will be in competition for Colcoa awards.

The cinema competition will close on May 2, with the North American premiere of Eric Lavaine’s new romantic comedy, “You Choose,” starring Alexandra Lamy.

“Colcoa will reach a new level in 2017 with two new categories – a virtual reality program and web series competition – added to the Cinema, Television, and Shorts competitions,” said François Truffart, executive producer and artistic director. “These two new popular formats offer »

- Dave McNary

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 31 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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