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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 39 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Reese Witherspoon Will Narrate Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman

23 April 2015 9:10 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Little has been revealed up until this point about Harper Lee's soon-to-be released second novel, Go Set a Watchman, but one of Hollywood's most famous faces is now linked to the highly anticipated project. Reese Witherspoon will lend her voice to the audio version of the To Kill a Mockingbird follow-up. The Oscar-winning actress spoke about the exciting news to USA Today, saying, "as a Southerner, it is an honor and a privilege to give voice to the Southern characters who inspired a childhood love of reading, Scout and Atticus Finch." The mother of three added that she's "eager for readers to be transported to a pivotal time in American history in the manner that only Lee's »

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A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in the Movies

13 April 2015 2:25 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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The Cover for Harper Lee’s New Book Will Hopefully Make All Those Complicated Feelings Go Away

25 March 2015 11:16 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Harper Lee's second novel Go Set a Watchman is coming in July — news that was greeted first with applause, then with a growing sense of unease, as reports came in that the 88-year-old Lee might not be of sound mind. As Lee's team works to reassure fans that everything about the new release is all aboveboard, People has the first look at the book's cover. There's a train on the cover! How can you feel weird about a book that has a train on the cover? »

- Nate Jones

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First Look at Harper Lee’s New Novel ‘Go Set a Watchman’ (Photo)

25 March 2015 10:13 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

HarperCollins has released the cover art for Harper Lee’s highly anticipated second novel “Go Set a Watchman.” The cover features a black tree with yellow leaves standing starkly over train tracks as a train approaches. The book will open with Scout, who was the protagonist in Lee’s first novel “To Kill a Mockingbird,” taking a train from New York back to Alabama to visit her father, Atticus Finch. In a statement, Lee said: “In the mid-1950s, I completed a novel called ‘Go Set a Watchman.’ It features the character known as Scout as an adult woman, and I thought it a. »

- Joe Otterson

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Here's the Cover of Harper Lee's New Book!

25 March 2015 9:30 AM, PDT | BuzzSugar | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Harper Lee's next novel, Go Set a Watchman, now has a cover! The book, which was announced in February, was actually written before To Kill a Mockingbird and features the characters from the story 20 years later. Here's the official synopsis from HarperCollins: "Returning home to Maycomb to visit her father, Jean Louise Finch - Scout - struggles with issues both personal and political, involving Atticus, society, and the small Alabama town that shaped her." The 288-page novel is due out on June 14! »

- Maggie-Pehanick

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Harper Lee's 2nd Book Go Set a Watchman Gets Cover Similar to To Kill a Mockingbird's—See the Photo!

25 March 2015 8:03 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Harper Lee's second book Go Set a Watchman, seen as a sequel to her 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning book To Kill a Mockingbird, which is her only published novel, has gotten a throwback cover. The author, now 88, had written Go Set a Watchman and submitted the story to her publishers first. The cover design was revealed on Wednesday and shows a dark oak tree and a train approaching on tracks, possibly at dusk. Several covers of To Kill a Mockingbird features trees. An oak tree plays a key part in the plot of the classic, popular novel, which is set in the '30s and focuses on racism in the South. "There are so many wonderful parts of Go Set a Watchman hat it was hard to »

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Podcast: Reviewing 'Insurgent', What One Listener Has Learned Listening to the Podcast and More

20 March 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Today's episode includes our review of Insurgent and Brad talks about an upcoming movie he still has 30 minutes to watch, stemming from a conversation regarding reviewing movies before you've seen the whole thing or even reviewing it all without seeing it. On top of that we explore listener Mitch's article "What I've Learned from Listening to 340 episodes of The "Brad and Laremy on movies" podcast", play a couple voicemails, play some games, talk some news and dabble into the March Madness basketball tournament. If you are on Twitter, we have a Twitter account dedicated to the podcast at @bnlpod. Give us a follow won'tchac I want to remind you that you can call in and leave us your comments, thoughts, questions, etc. directly on our Google Voice account, which you can call and leave a message for us at (925) 526-5763, which may be even easier to remember at (925) 5-bnl-pod. Just call, »

- Brad Brevet

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Best Director: Why We Don’t Make Women into Icons

16 March 2015 4:03 PM, PDT | AwardsDaily.com | See recent AwardsDaily news »

There are women who have become icons in literature, even if contenders for the “Great American Novel” are reserved for men. Surely Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is »

- Sasha Stone

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One Agency Investigating Harper Lee Has Checked Out

12 March 2015 11:37 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

One of the state agencies looking at elder abuse claims tied to Harper Lee has finished its job, the New York Times reports. Joseph Borg, director of the Alabama Securities Commission, told the paper Thursday that the author "has opinions and seems to be aware of what is going on with her book and the book deal." After news broke of the To Kill a Mockingbird follow-up last month, friends, fans, and acquaintances in Monroeville, Alabama, and beyond began worrying that the 88-year-old author had been hoodwinked into publishing Go Set a Watchman. Another set of investigators, for the Alabama Department of Human Resources, are reportedly still trying to figure out if that's the case here and were continuing interviews this week. »

- Sean Fitz-Gerald

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Did Harper Lee Really Want to Release New Book? Alabama Investigating Claim of Elder Abuse Against To Kill a Mockingbird Author

12 March 2015 4:50 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Is it possible that Harper Lee still doesn't want to publish the now hotly anticipated follow-up to her 1960 classic To Kill a Mockingbird? The state of Alabama is investigating the quality of the iconic author's care at the assisted-living facility where she resides in the wake of ongoing concern over whether the 88-year-old Lee was capable of consenting to the publication of Go Set a Watchman, which she worked on before Mockingbird and which ended up giving rise to the classic tale of Scout, Jem and their lawyer father Atticus Finch, one of the most upright men in all of fiction. Since Lee only published the one novel, the eyebrow-raising announcement that No. 2 was on the way also gave rise to »

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Harper Lee Subject of Elder Abuse Investigation

12 March 2015 11:40 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Authorities in Alabama are investigating at least one complaint of potential elder abuse involving To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee. The complaint relates to the publication of the 88-year-old author’s new book, Go Set a Watchman, which was announced in February. Although fans rejoiced at the news of a follow-up to her 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, word of the sequel sparked controversy as well, with the reclusive Lee making a rare public comment to speak out against reports that she was pressured into releasing Watchman. Now the State of Alabama is getting involved, according to a new report in The New York Times. »

- Michelle Tauber, @michelletauber

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Harper Lee Subject of Elder Abuse Investigation

12 March 2015 11:40 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Authorities in Alabama are investigating at least one complaint of potential elder abuse involving To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee. The complaint relates to the publication of the 88-year-old author’s new book, Go Set a Watchman, which was announced in February. Although fans rejoiced at the news of a follow-up to her 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, word of the sequel sparked controversy as well, with the reclusive Lee making a rare public comment to speak out against reports that she was pressured into releasing Watchman. Now the State of Alabama is getting involved, according to a new report in The New York Times. »

- Michelle Tauber, @michelletauber

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The State of Alabama Is Also Concerned About Harper Lee’s Mental Condition

12 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

The skepticism behind Harper Lee's decision to publish a To Kill a Mockingbird follow-up has not abated. Now it has been revealed that Alabama officials have been investigating at least one report of potential elder abuse. The New York Times reports that over the course of the last month, the state has interviewed Lee, employees at her assisted-living facility, and her friends — the latter group still seemingly split into one camp that contends the author is lucid and another that says she's in her own world.An anonymous doctor who has known the author for years reportedly filed a complaint with the state because he wants to know whether Lee was too infirm to have signed off on publishing Go Set a Watchman. Alabama's Human Resources Department and the Alabama Securities Commission are digging to see if there's any evidence of financial exploitation going on. A source close to »

- Sean Fitz-Gerald

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Harper Lee Tells Reporter to ‘Go Away!’

6 March 2015 7:01 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Harper Lee can still write a letter, that's for sure. After Birmingham News reporter Connor Sheets made several attempts to track down the elusive author, he finally decided on sending her a two-page letter. It was quickly sent back to him, "wrinkled and refolded," with a very special, clear (and seemingly lucid!) response at the bottom: "Go away! Harper Lee." Now, that's best kind of autograph you could ever get: »

- Lindsey Weber

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Harper Lee May Have Just Responded to a Reporter, Making Her Upcoming Book Release Even More Complicated

5 March 2015 3:08 PM, PST | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

The Harper Lee plot thickens! Last month, the author's publisher announced that it would be unearthing a long-lost novel, titled Go Set a Watchman, that Lee wrote before completing the infamous To Kill a Mockingbird. Initial reaction to the announcement was overwhelmingly positive, as fans of Mockingbird had long been bumming over the fact that it was the author's only book. But critics also surfaced, questioning whether Watchman was being released against the aging Lee's will.  Now, an investigative reporter with the Birmingham News is claiming that he has proof that Harper Lee appears to be in fact lucid and every bit aware of the circumstances. But it still sounds a little fishy to »

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Harper Lee Pens Note to Journalist: "Go Away!" (Report)

5 March 2015 8:21 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Harper Lee is not in the mood to speak to journalists, at least based on what appears to be a handwritten response from the 88-year-old author to an Alabama reporter. Connor Sheets, an investigative reporter for the Birmingham News, claimed he wrote a letter to Lee in February, hoping to reach the author after several more direct attempts to contact her were unsuccessful. Sheets said he tried to get in touch with Lee via her lawyer, her publisher, and even by visiting Lee at her Monroeville nursing home in Monroeville. When he arrived at the nursing home, Sheets

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- THR Staff

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There’s a New Sherlock Holmes Story by Arthur Conan Doyle, and You Can Read It Right Here

20 February 2015 10:57 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

We've officially got a trend: After Harper Lee and Dr. Seuss, Arthur Conan Doyle is the third author this month whose lost work has been rediscovered and reintroduced to the world. In Doyle's case, the forgotten work is a short Sherlock Holmes story from 1904, written as part of a fund-raising campaign for a new bridge in the Scottish town of Selkirk. "Sherlock Holmes: Discovering the Border Burghs and, By Deduction, the Brig Bazaar" was published in a one-off book called The Book o' the Brig, a copy of which was recently found by historian Walter Elliot. (He'd had it for 50 years but forgot about it.) And since Sherlock Holmes is in the public domain, we've published the very meta tale below.  "We've had enough of old romancists and the men of travel" said the Editor, as he blue-pencilled his copy, and made arrangements for the great Saturday edition of »

- Nate Jones,A. Conan Doyle

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Harper Lee's 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Sequel Sparks Questions Over Film Rights

11 February 2015 5:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

A version of this story first appeared in the Feb. 20 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. It's been more than 50 years since Atticus Finch made his closing argument in Oscar best picture nominee To Kill a Mockingbird. But the righteous attorney (played by Gregory Peck) and his precocious daughter Scout suddenly are poised for a theatrical return. Publisher HarperCollins revealed Feb. 3 that author Harper Lee, 88, finally has consented to the release of Go Set a Watchman -- a book she wrote before penning the classic Mockingbird -- which follows Atticus and Scout two decades after Mockingbird's events. The

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- Tatiana Siegel, Andy Lewis

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StreamFix: 5 Amazing 'Best Supporting Actor' Winners to Watch Now

9 February 2015 3:58 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Now that these damn Grammys are out of the way, we can focus on the only meaningless award that matters: the Oscar. The Best Supporting Actor category has a varied and interesting past, and if you check out Netflix right now, you can drink in these legendary performances that picked up a trophy. George Sanders in "All About Eve" This is my personal pick for the best win in the Supporting Actor category. George Sanders plays the deadly droll Addison DeWitt, a theater critic whose snipes make or break thespian careers. He's enchanted (but not fooled) by the manipulative sociopath Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter), who sets out to supplant veteran actress Margo Channing (Bette Davis) as the reigning doyenne of the New York stage. Though Sanders is hilarious throughout "All About Eve," he rather poetically articulates the pleasure of theater (and, in doing so, sums up "Birdman") during his finest »

- Louis Virtel

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Harper Lee’s Lawyer Responds to Go Set a Watchman Speculation

9 February 2015 1:41 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

In her first extensive interview since Harper Lee's second novel came to light, the author's lawyer, Tonja Carter, refuted claims that Lee has been taken advantage of and told the New York Times how she found the manuscript. "[Lee] is a very strong, independent, and wise woman who should be enjoying the discovery of her long lost novel," Carter said. "Instead, she is having to defend her own credibility and decision making." Residents of Lee's hometown, Monroeville, Alabama, seem split over whether this is true, with some saying Lee is lucid and others saying the writer is mentally infirm (and easily manipulated). Some question whether the lawyer has Lee's best interests in mind, but one of Lee's friends defended Carter. "Tonja has the full confidence of Nelle," the friend said, using Lee's real first name. "And I can say with confidence that Tonja would not do anything that Nelle would »

- Sean Fitz-Gerald

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 39 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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