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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


The Definitive Scary Scenes from Non-Horror Movies: 30-21

17 October 2014 6:01 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

30. No Country for Old Men (2007)

Scene: Coin Flip

Video: http://youtu.be/0iAezyDzj0M

There was a brief period of time from 2006-2009 when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences made some more daring, but wholly deserved choices for Best Picture. It began in 2006, when Martin Scorsese finally won for The Departed which, while not his best and not nearly as dark as, say, Taxi Driver or Raging Bull, still leaned that direction. Three years later, they handed the Oscar to The Hurt Locker over the blockbuster Avatar, rewarding quality over audience love. But in between the two it was given to No Country for Old Men, an incredibly dark neo-Western based on the Cormac McCarthy novel of the same name. It’s still one of the Coen Brothers’ best films, an incredible cat-and-mouse journey through West Texas in the 1980′s. The film stars Josh Brolin, Tommy Lee Jones, »

- Joshua Gaul

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10 Most Embarrassing Movie Uncles

4 October 2014 6:22 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Paramount Pictures

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Harper Lee famously once said: “You can choose your friends but you sho’ can’t choose your family, an’ they’re still kin to you no matter whether you acknowledge ‘em or not, and it makes you look right silly when you don’t.” Shailene Woodley recently said that “Every family is dysfunctional, whether you want to admit it or not.”

With that being said, we all have family matters who we’re not exactly proud of. Whether it’s an alcoholic father who loves to ramble on about nothing in particular or a cousin who can’t seem to stay out of jail. Dysfunctional families is just a part of growing up.

Today we’re going to be looking at a family member who never really gets their proper respect… uncles. An embarrassing uncle is an essential part of any dysfunctional family. And the »

- Jesse Gumbarge

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Rhonyc Reunion: Ramona Singer Snaps When Andy Cohen Asks About Her Divorce

5 August 2014 11:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Part One of The Real Housewives of New York City reunion was filled with juicy lines, but Part Two on Tuesday was filled with fights. The tensest moment of the reunion came when host Andy Cohen asked Ramona Singer about her divorce from husband Mario and their current relationship. "Everyone in my family is doing well," Singer started, refusing to say anything further because of her daughter. "Mario and I are together … Let's go to someone else. Thanks, Andy." When Cohen tried to push the discussion, Singer pushed back. "So, how's your love life? Who are you going to have sex with tonight? »

- Wade Rouse

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Rhonyc Reunion: Ramona Singer Snaps When Andy Cohen Asks About Her Divorce

5 August 2014 11:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Part One of The Real Housewives of New York City reunion was filled with juicy lines, but Part Two on Tuesday was filled with fights. The tensest moment of the reunion came when host Andy Cohen asked Ramona Singer about her divorce from husband Mario and their current relationship. "Everyone in my family is doing well," Singer started, refusing to say anything further because of her daughter. "Mario and I are together … Let's go to someone else. Thanks, Andy." When Cohen tried to push the discussion, Singer pushed back. "So, how's your love life? Who are you going to have sex with tonight? »

- Wade Rouse

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Required Reading: Waiting For Entertainment and the Danger of ‘Sharknado’

4 August 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya? “Guardians of the Galaxy Easter Eggs, Trivia and References” — Andrew Dyce at Screen Rant digs into Marvel’s latest to share some context and little things you might have missed. “The 10 best summer romances in film” — Guy Lodge at The Guardian proves we’ve been falling in love while sweating for almost a century, compiling a list that’s a bit more insider than populist. On #6: “Robert Mulligan knew the elegiac nature of an American summer: there’sTo Kill a Mockingbird, of course, but he also made a pretty good lunge for this list with the liltingly scored wartime weepie Summer of ’42. His final and most undervalued film, The Man in the Moon, combines the latter’s Rockwell romanticism with a measure of Harper Lee’s tough love – it conveys the full »

- Scott Beggs

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Amanda’s Adaptations: To Kill a Mockingbird – Book Vs Film

25 July 2014 3:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Reading To Kill a Mockingbird as a teenager had a massive impact on me. The powerful story with messages about tolerance, understanding and trying to see life from another’s perspective really opened my eyes to the everyday injustices of the world.

Harper Lee’s book is written from two perspectives in a way – a woman looking back at her childhood and that same child looking out into the world and asking questions adults didn’t dare ask. As a central character, Scout is miraculous. She is inquisitive and naughty but ultimately good. She tries to do her best, it’s just that her best frequently rubs people up the wrong way. Whether it’s the neighbours telling her off for dressing like a boy or her teacher telling her off for knowing how to read, the only person Scout seems to be able to be herself with is her father Atticus. »

- Amanda Keats

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The Decline of Harper Lee

20 July 2014 5:56 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

For Monroeville, Alabama, population 6,400 and shrinking, the summer of 2010 was momentous. Over a long July weekend, locals reenacted historical vignettes, held a silent auction, cooked a southern feast, and led tours of local landmarks. There was a documentary screening, two lawn parties, and a marathon reading of the novel whose 50th anniversary was the grand occasion. To Kill a Mockingbird, which needs no introduction — because it is the introduction, for most American children, to civil rights, literature, and the justice system — had sold nearly a million copies for each year in print. There were at least 50 other celebrations nationwide, but the epicenter was Monroeville, a place whose only real industry (the lingerie plant having recently shuttered) was Mockingbird-related tourism. It was not only the model for the novel’s fictional Maycomb but the home of its author, Harper Lee. She lived less than a mile from »

- Boris Kachka

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To Kill a Mockingbird Author Harper Lee Claims New Memoir Was Unauthorized

15 July 2014 6:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee has again spoken out against a memoir that she claims is unauthorized. Former Chicago Tribune reporter Marja Mills wrote The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee, which hits bookstores Tuesday, and documents the 18 months that Mills spent living next door to Lee and her older sister, Alice, in Alabama. The book was published with their blessing, according to Penguin Press. However, Lee insists that once she realized Mills intended to write "another book about Harper Lee," she "cut off all contact with Miss Mills, leaving town whenever she headed this way," she »

- Tara Fowler

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To Kill a Mockingbird Author Harper Lee Claims New Memoir Was Unauthorized

15 July 2014 6:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee has again spoken out against a memoir that she claims is unauthorized. Former Chicago Tribune reporter Marja Mills wrote The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee, which hits bookstores Tuesday, and documents the 18 months that Mills spent living next door to Lee and her older sister, Alice, in Alabama. The book was published with their blessing, according to Penguin Press. However, Lee insists that once she realized Mills intended to write "another book about Harper Lee," she "cut off all contact with Miss Mills, leaving town whenever she headed this way," she »

- Tara Fowler

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Rosemary Murphy, 'To Kill A Mockingbird' Actress, Dies At 89

9 July 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

To Kill a Mockingbird actress Rosemary Murphy died on Saturday in New York City. She was 89.

Rosemary Murphy Dies

Murphy had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer and passed away in her Upper East Side apartment, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

In the 1962 film adaptation of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird, Murphy played neighbor Maudie Atkinson, better known as Miss Maudie. Her character lives across the street from lawyer Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck) and his two young children – Scout (Mary Badham) and Jem (Phillip Alford) in the fictional Maycomb, Alabama.

Prior to appearing in To Kill a Mockingbird, Murphy appeared in a number of TV series, including Robert Montgomery Presents, Thriller, Naked City, Wide Country and The Doctors and the Nurses. Following her turn in the Oscar-nominated picture, Murphy continued her TV work.

Murphy earned her first Emmy for playing Sara Delano Roosevelt in 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin. »

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Salt and Pepper: Top 10 Black and White Movie Tandems

5 July 2014 8:54 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

When mixing black and white movie characters as either friends or foes on the big screen should not produce any gray areas at all. Whether amiable or adversarial the pairing of interracial tandems makes for an interesting sociological study in cinema where tension, togetherness, stereotypical profiling and mutual or reluctant acceptance makes for some captivating film fodder.

Sure, in many ways it is an overused cliched in the movies to produce racial tandems for the sake of the entertainment to allow the creative juices to overflow. In Salt and Pepper: Top 10 Black and White Movie Tandems we will take a look at various “salt and pepper” teams as they come together in the name of law and justice, hostile necessity, friendly frivolity or professional attachment to bring movie audiences a sense of adventure and curiosity in the name of comedic or dramatic license. Maybe you have your favorite cultural »

- Frank Ochieng

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Watch: Two New Trailers For Wrestling Biopic ‘Foxcatcher’

3 July 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Sony has released two new trailers for Cannes Film Festival favourite, Foxcatcher.

The biopic, starring Steve CarellChanning Tatum, and Mark Ruffalo, follows the true-life tragic story of Olympic Wrestling Champion brothers Mark and Dave Schultz. However things take a dark turn when their coach, John du Pont murders Dave. 

The trailers show tension building between the trio and feature clips of some strong performances. They’re both quite similar, but trailer B seems a bit more ominous in tone. Bennett Miller won at Cannes for his direction of Foxcatcher and true life material is obviously an area he’s is comfortable with. Miller received an Oscar nomination for 2005′s Capote, which follows American author (and best mate of Harper Lee), Truman Capote during his research into the Clutter family murders for seminal novel In Cold Blood. He also turned to sports for 2011′s Moneyball, starring Brad Pitt, which focuses »

- Claire Joanne Huxham

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It’s About the Message: The Top 10 Oscar-winning Socially Aware Films

14 June 2014 10:40 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Many moviegoers consider the world of film as a reprieve from their current existing realities. This is rather interesting because in looking to escape the everyday realities for a fantasized slice of reality in cinema might seem quite redundant for some folks. However, the realities that are portrayed on the big screen are varied so whatever life experiences are depicted we may not have quite lived that particular episode therefore making it intriguing and fresh for our entertaining curiosities.

Films, when capturing a fragrance of reality through triumph and tragedy, are usually armed with a special messaging about the human condition through sacrifice, self-discovery, suffering and of course social awareness.  In It’s About the Message: The Top 10 Oscar-winning Socially Aware Films we will take a look at Academy Award-winning movies that dared to examine the spirit about being socially aware–through inspiration and insidiousness (or both simultaneously)–and put »

- Frank Ochieng

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Bill Watterson, creator of 'Calvin and Hobbes,' returned to comic strips this week -- Images

8 June 2014 11:07 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Bill Watterson drew Calvin and Hobbes, the last great comic strip of the 20th century and one of the best things ever, period. Then he retired and generally opted out of public life — not quite the comics’ Salinger but maybe the comics’ Harper Lee. 2014 is the year that changed. A few months ago, Watterson illustrated the poster for the comic documentary Stripped. And this week, Watterson staged a quiet comeback to the comics page, contributing artwork to three Pearls Before Swine strips.

As recounted by Swine’s writer-illustrator Stephan Pastis on his blog, the contribution emerged out of an email exchange between the two cartoonists. »

- Darren Franich

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Six of The Best Movie Courtroom Scenes

25 April 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The courtroom is the ultimate movie set. The elements of a criminal trial are effectively a scriptwriter’s ‘How To’ guide. The case for the prosecution is pure plot development; the conflict is inherent in two sides making completely opposing arguments. Main characters are set at loggerheads, motives are compromised and minor characters are wheeled in and out as witnesses at the writer’s beck and call. Finally, at its heart there is a mystery that can’t be solved until the judge bangs his gavel for the final time, or maybe just afterwards in a third act sting (see Jagged Edge, for example). It is no wonder Hollywood drags itself back to the courts time and time again.

The courtroom movie really came into prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s, during the death-throes of monochrome film. Movies like Inherit The Wind, Anatomy of a Murder, 12 Angry Men, »

- Cai Ross

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Six of The Best Literary Adaptations

4 April 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

If you’re a fan of literary adaptations then no doubt you’ll currently have your head stuck in a copy of Joyce Maynard’s emotional coming-of-age novel Labor Day, Nick Hornby’s heart-warming suicide drama A Long Way Down, or maybe even Veronica Roth’s debut dystopian Divergent. What we’re looking forward to most, however, is Richard Ayoade’s upcoming adaptation of Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s dark comedy novella, The Double. With an adapted screenplay written by Ayoade himself alongside fellow scribe Avi Korine, this is his first film since the hugely successful Submarine.

Starring Jesse Eisenberg and Mia Wasikowska as the two leads, the story follows a man driven insane after finding out his life and identity is being assumed by a doppelgänger. The original novella was released in 1846, subtitled “A Petersburg Poem” it showed the surreal and grotesque influences of fellow Russian novelist Nikolai Gogol, »

- Charlie Derry

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The Oscars' youngest winners and nominees: Where are they now?

26 February 2014 9:17 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

There's just days to go before Ellen DeGeneres hosts the biggest event in the movie world's calendar - the 86th annual Academy Awards.

This year's nominees include newcomers Lupita Nyong'o and Barkhad Abdi, who are recognised for their supporting breakthrough performances in 12 Years a Slave and Captain Phillips respectively.

Ahead of Sunday's (March 2) glittering ceremony at Hollywood's Kodak Theater, we reminisce upon other breakthrough roles from some of the youngest Oscar-nominated stars in history - and what they've gone on to do since - below:

Tatum O'Neal in Paper Moon

Tatum O'Neal became the youngest Oscar winner in history, picking up the Best Supporting Actress trophy at the tender age of 10 for her role as strong-willed tomboy Addie in Paper Moon (1973), in which she appeared opposite her father Ryan O'Neal.

The actress went on to appear in successful movies such as The Bad News Bears Nickelodeon with Burt Reynolds, and »

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DiCaprio, Breslin and Foster: Breakthrough Oscars stars then and now

26 February 2014 9:17 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

There's just days to go before Ellen DeGeneres hosts the biggest event in the movie world's calendar - the 86th annual Academy Awards.

This year's nominees include newcomers Lupita Nyong'o and Barkhad Abdi, who are recognised for their supporting breakthrough performances in 12 Years a Slave and Captain Phillips respectively.

Ahead of Sunday's (March 2) glittering ceremony at Hollywood's Kodak Theater, we reminisce upon other breakthrough roles from some of the youngest Oscar-nominated stars in history - and what they've gone on to do since - below:

Tatum O'Neal in Paper Moon

Tatum O'Neal became the youngest Oscar winner in history, picking up the Best Supporting Actress trophy at the tender age of 10 for her role as strong-willed tomboy Addie in Paper Moon (1973), in which she appeared opposite her father Ryan O'Neal.

The actress went on to appear in successful movies such as The Bad News Bears Nickelodeon with Burt Reynolds, and »

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Poll: Your Favorite Performance By This Year’s Best Actress Nominees

24 February 2014 7:24 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

We have six days ’til the Oscars, and that means we have six more days to celebrate one of the most intimidating, established rosters of Best Actress nominees in years. Together the ladies on this list have been nominated 38 times. That’s a serious nomination number, guys. We’re getting into an Alison Krauss/Grammys situation now. Man. Let’s get Judi Dench a fiddle.

The poll question is simple: What are your favorite movies starring this year’s Best Actress nominees? I’ve selected my responses below. Fight for your own (and mine, if you can get around to it).

Cate Blanchett

Winner: Blue Jasmine

Runner-up: Elizabeth

Tough one. Elizabeth leaves a lasting impression, and re-watching it recently, I was surprised to find how much Blanchett reminded me of her fellow Australian Judy Davis. Even though she looks like an austere hybrid of Gwyneth Paltrow and a California Suite-era Maggie Smith, »

- Louis Virtel

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Oscar Winner Hoffman, Child Star Temple Honored with Library of Congress Screenings

20 February 2014 5:53 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Shirley Temple, and Oscar movies: Library of Congress’ March 2014 screenings (photo: Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote in ‘Capote’) Tributes to the recently deceased Shirley Temple and Philip Seymour Hoffman, and several Academy Award-nominated and -winning films are among the March 2014 screenings at the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater and, in collaboration with the Library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, The State Theatre, both located in Culpeper, Virginia. The 1934 sentimental comedy-drama Little Miss Marker (March 6, Packard) is the movie that turned six-year-old Shirley Temple into a major film star. Temple would become the biggest domestic box-office draw of the mid-1930s, and, Tyrone Power, Alice Faye, Sonja Henie, Don Ameche, Loretta Young, and Madeleine Carroll notwithstanding, would remain 20th Century Fox’s top star until later in the decade. Directed by Alexander Hall (Here Comes Mr. Jordan, My Sister Eileen), Little Miss Marker — actually, a Paramount »

- Andre Soares

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 26 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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