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‘Dunkirk (1958)’ DVD Review

Stars: John Mills, Richard Attenborough, Bernard Lee, Robert Urquhart, Ray Jackson, Ronald Hines, Sean Barrett, Roland Curram, Meredith Edwards, Michael Bates, Maxine Audley, Lionel Jeffries | Written by David Divine, W.P. Lipscomb | Directed by Leslie Norman

While this year’s Dunkirk brought an intensity to the screen conveying the horrors of what was experienced by the soldiers at Dunkirk, there was a version of that same story that was released back in 1958. Now digitally restored and available on DVD and Blu-ray, this Dunkirk is an interesting look at how the true events affected many people.

When Nazi Germany invaded France, the British army found themselves in retreat. Making their way to Dunkirk which was the only means of escape, Operation Dynamo was put into action to get the soldiers out of France and home.

What is interesting about this version of Dunkirk is the fact it is a darker look at
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The Battle of the River Plate

Powell & Pressburger’s big-scale historical epic is perhaps the best show ever about an old-school naval encounter between battleships. The first half depicts the showdown between England and Germany in the South Atlantic, and the second half a tense diplomatic game in the neutral country of Uruguay. Peter Finch, Bernard Lee and Anthony Quayle shine as sea captains.

Panzerschiff Graf Spee (The Battle of the River Plate)

Region B Blu-ray

ITV Studios Home Entertainment (Germany)

1956 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 119, 106 117 min./ Pursuit of the Graf Spee / Street Date 2010 / Available from Amazon UK £16.90

Starring: Peter Finch, Bernard Lee, Anthony Quayle, John Gregson, Ian Hunter, Jack Gwillim, Lionel Murton, Anthony Bushell, Peter Illing, Michael Goodliffe, Patrick Macnee, Christopher Lee.

Cinematography: Christopher Challis

Production Design: Arthur Lawson

Film Editor: Reginald Mills

Original Music: Brian Easdale

Written, Produced & Directed by Michael Powell & Emeric Pressberger

The best way so far to see the impressive The Battle of the River Plate
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Back on Track: Interview with star of T2: Trainspotting, Jonny Lee Miller

  • Cineplex
Back on Track: Interview with star of T2: Trainspotting, Jonny Lee MillerBack on Track: Interview with star of T2: Trainspotting, Jonny Lee MillerJulide Tanriverdi - Cineplex Magazine3/14/2017 10:01:00 Am

When, in June 2016, rumour got out that director Danny Boyle had started filming the sequel to his cult hit Trainspotting people got very excited.

Paparazzi and fans alike flocked to the Edinburgh set and disrupted filming, making it tough for the filmmakers to keep anything secret. “They were trying to shelter our costumes. They had umbrellas and were like, ‘Put your hood on when you get your hair done,’” recalls Jonny Lee Miller, who once again plays platinum-blond drug addict Sick Boy. “Danny said, ‘It’s like f--king Star Wars up here.’ There was a level of excitement which was quite alarming.”

The 1996 film was an unexpected sensation and made instant stars out of Miller and his co-stars Ewan McGregor,
See full article at Cineplex »

The Forgotten: Leslie Norman's "Dunkirk" (1958)

  • MUBI
Apart from the usual Powell & Pressburger and David Lean masterpieces, I have steered rather away from the great British war movie during my cinematic peregrinations. Growing up in the UK, one did get rather tired of hearing about these films, spoken of in terms of nostalgia and sentiment. This kind of admiration for movies based on their respectable subject matter rather than their artistry felt like exactly the kind of patriotic attitude to film culture that kept Michael Powell languishing in obscurity for so many years.But in my mellow senescence I can appreciate these movies a bit more. Dunkirk is an interesting flick. On the one hand it's an epic, with armies of extras, special effects, and a narrative sweep that takes almost the whole first act of WWII, from the British perspective. On the other hand, it's a product of Ealing Studios, best known for comedy but ideologically attuned to celebrating group efforts,
See full article at MUBI »

The Purple Plain

Fans of this show know it as the It's a Wonderful Life of war movies, an intensely moving tale that restores feeling and tenderness to people crippled by loss and despair. The stellar pairing of top star Gregory Peck and Burmese unknown Win Min Than is unique in movies and not to be missed. The Purple Plain Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1955 / Color /1:66 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date April 5, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Gregory Peck, Win Min Than, Brenda De Banzie, Bernard Lee, Maurice Denham, Lyndon Brook, Anthony Bushell, Josephine Griffin Cinematography Geoffrey Unsworth Art Direction Donald M. Ashton, Jack Maxsted Film Editor Clive Donner Original Music John Veale Written by Eric Ambler from a novel by H.E. Bates Produced by John Bryan, Earl St. John Directed by Robert Parrish

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

How can one convey the way a picture grows on one? I liked The Purple Plain
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors

Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing costar in a worthwhile horror attraction -- and for once even share some scenes. Amicus gives us five tales of the uncanny, each with a clever twist or sting in its tail. Creepy mountebank Cushing deals the Tarot cards that spell out the grim fates in store; Chris Lee is a pompous art critic wih a handy problem. Also with Michael Gough and introducing a young Donald Sutherland. Dr. Terror's House of Horrors Blu-ray Olive Films 1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 98 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 <Starring Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, Michael Gough, Donald Sutherland, Alan Freeman, Max Adrian, Roy Castle, Ursula Howells, Neil McCallum, Bernard Lee, Jennifer Jayne, Jeremy Kemp, Harold Lang, Katy Wild, Isla Blair, Al Mulock. Cinematography Alan Hume Film Editor Thelma Cornell Original Music Elizabeth Lutyens Written by Milton Subotsky Produced by Max Rosenberg, Milton Subotsky Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cummings Pt.3: Gender-Bending from Joan of Arc to Comic Farce, Liberal Supporter of Political Refugees

'Saint Joan': Constance Cummings as the George Bernard Shaw heroine. Constance Cummings on stage: From sex-change farce and Emma Bovary to Juliet and 'Saint Joan' (See previous post: “Constance Cummings: Frank Capra, Mae West and Columbia Lawsuit.”) In the mid-1930s, Constance Cummings landed the title roles in two of husband Benn W. Levy's stage adaptations: Levy and Hubert Griffith's Young Madame Conti (1936), starring Cummings as a demimondaine who falls in love with a villainous character. She ends up killing him – or does she? Adapted from Bruno Frank's German-language original, Young Madame Conti was presented on both sides of the Atlantic; on Broadway, it had a brief run in spring 1937 at the Music Box Theatre. Based on the Gustave Flaubert novel, the Theatre Guild-produced Madame Bovary (1937) was staged in late fall at Broadway's Broadhurst Theatre. Referring to the London production of Young Madame Conti, The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’ – a challenging, invigorating and romantic piece of action filmmaking

  • SoundOnSight
On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Written by Richard Maibaum

Directed by Peter Hunt

UK, 1969

To call On Her Majesty’s Secret Service underappreciated is to call the sky blue. Only in the years since the release of Daniel Craig’s introduction to the series, Casino Royale, has Ohmss begun to be reappraised as a realistic, character-driven approach to the Bond series. Its failure at the box office compared to the Connery entries that preceded it led to the producers, Albert “Cubby” Broccoli and Harry Salzman, returning to the Goldfinger formula of larger than life villains, iconic henchmen, ludicrously elaborate take-over-the-world schemes, and a generally heightened sense to the proceedings, all of which are noticeably absent from Ohmss.

Sean Connery had a rough experience during filming of 1967’s You Only Live Twice. The media scrutiny, long filming periods, and promotional duties caused him to leave the role that had made his career.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

James Bond 007: revisiting Skyfall

  • Den of Geek
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A peroxide Terminator, a magnificent M, and stunning set-pieces. We revisit Sam Mendes' first Bond film, Skyfall...

The film: Brilliant first half, problematic second. But even the second half is still pretty good. Manages to celebrate the traditions/clichés of the franchise without ever descending into parody. Stunning set-pieces in Istanbul, Shanghai and Macau showcase the globetrotting and glamour that has served the franchise so well (naturally, we end in Scotland). The plot disappears halfway through and finale is again underwhelming, although less so than the previous Craigs. Ultimately Skyfall is a great Bond film on first watch, a very good one thereafter.

The Villain: A fine antagonist, although certainly not the best ever. The first camp baddie since Wint and Kidd in Diamonds Are Forever (and they were only henchmen). Silva is a heap of fun. His deep, sexy voice charms you, but those cold
See full article at Den of Geek »

Countdown to Spectre – Moonraker

Ricky Church continues his countdown to Spectre with a review of Moonraker

In 1979 the Bond franchise took a turn to science fiction as Bond ventured into space for his adventure in Moonraker. Though he had previously investigated space programs or fought against space lasers, he had never before gone into outer space. Why did the franchise decide to veer in such a sci-fi direction? Well, it has a little something to do with a small 1977 film you may have heard of called Star Wars.

Due to Star Wars being a surprise financial and critical success, sci-fi reemerged as a popular film genre and made many studios eager to produce a sci-fi film. Rather than film For Your Eyes Only, announced at the end of Spy Who Loved Me, producer Albert Broccoli decided to do Moonraker instead to get in on the sci-fi bandwagon. What resulted was a disjointed film that,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

James Bond 007: revisiting Tomorrow Never Dies

  • Den of Geek
Pierce Brosnan's second outing as James Bond may not be Goldeneye strength, but Tomorrow Never Dies still has its moments...

For many, Tomorrow Never Dies is the forgotten middle child of the Brosnan era. Neither as loved as Goldeneye, nor reviled as Die Another Day, and it doesn’t have Christmas Jones. A muscular, accomplished outing that certainly deserves the prefix 'action' before any mention of 'thriller', Tomorrow Never Dies is the moment Brosnan hit his stride and simultaneously fell over. Great chases, hissable villains and one of the brightest of Bond’s flames in Paris Carver keep this viewer happy. The over-explosive climax and reluctance to experiment hint at trouble ahead.

The villain: I think Rupert’s gonna sue somebody… The antipodean qualities of megalomaniac media mogul Elliot Carver have only grown more pronounced over time. He’s a fine villain in his own right, with that fine
See full article at Den of Geek »

Trainspotting cast then and now: Danny Boyle and Ewan McGregor might be back to make a Porno

Trainspotting cast then and now: Danny Boyle and Ewan McGregor might be back to make a Porno
News of a possible Trainspotting sequel - based on Irvine Welsh's follow-up novel Porno, released in 2002 - has left us climbing on the ceiling with anticipation. Could director Danny Boyle really wrangle together the cast once more? And could Trainspotting 2 - as they definitely won't call it - live up to the hype?

With the 20th anniversary coming up just next year, here's what Spud and company have been up to since they all chose life...

Digital Spy's Porno poster:

The original Trainspotting poster:

1. Robert Carlyle

Character: Francis "Franco" Begbie

Age then: 33

Age now: 54

Biggest acting gigs since: The Full Monty, The World Is Not Enough, Angela's Ashes and TV's Once Upon A Time, Stargate Universe and 24: Redemption

Carlyle joined forces with Boyle again on The Beach, and worked alongside Samuel L Jackson in 51st State, but his "career highlight" has been directing his first film, The Legend of Barney Thomson,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Trainspotting cast then and now: Danny Boyle and Ewan McGregor want to make a Porno

Trainspotting cast then and now: Danny Boyle and Ewan McGregor want to make a Porno
News of a possible Trainspotting sequel - based on Irvine Welsh's follow-up novel Porno, released in 2002 - has left us climbing on the ceiling with anticipation. Could director Danny Boyle really wrangle together the cast once more? And could Trainspotting 2 - as they definitely won't call it - live up to the hype?

With the 20th anniversary coming up just next year, here's what Spud and company have been up to since they all chose life...

Digital Spy's Porno poster:

The original Trainspotting poster:

1. Robert Carlyle

Character: Francis "Franco" Begbie

Age then: 33

Age now: 54

Biggest acting gigs since: The Full Monty, The World Is Not Enough, Angela's Ashes and TV's Once Upon A Time, Stargate Universe and 24: Redemption

Carlyle joined forces with Boyle again on The Beach, and worked alongside Samuel L Jackson in 51st State, but his "career highlight" has been directing his first film, The Legend of Barney Thomson,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

James Bond 007: revisiting Goldeneye

  • Den of Geek
Martin Campbell's Goldeneye rebooted James Bond, introduced Pierce Brosnan in the role, and proved to be a major hit. We take a look back...

This article contains spoilers for Goldeneye.

Goldeneye: a mostly triumphant return after an extended absence. Far from perfect but its flaws are overwhelmed by the sheer brio of the whole thing, especially once former Bond bestie Alec Trevelyan finally shows face. The reliance on gadgets is just about right (the exploding pen got a Skyfall namecheck) and the action is reliably entertaining. At least provided you can enjoy a tank chase through Moscow - which this writer certainly can. Probably the most loved of the Brosnan Bonds, although arguably Tomorrow Never Dies is a more coherent film (we'll be coming to that one next, of course). But this one had a lot riding on it. After six years it was do or die -
See full article at Den of Geek »

Carol Reed's Classic 'The Third Man' 4K Restoration Official Trailer

"Heard of Harry Lime?" Rialto Pictures has debuted a new trailer for the 4K restoration of Carol Reed's classic film noir The Third Man, which will be premiering as a Cannes Classic selection later this month at the festival in France. This just looks so unbelievably stunning in 4K, all the cinematography is fabulous, it looks gorgeous seeing so much depth in the shadows. The cast includes Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Trevor Howard and Bernard Lee. This is one of those classics that if you haven't ever seen, it's always the right time to watch. Or in this case, catch it on the big screen looking better than ever before. Trailer for the Cannes Classics 4K restoration of Carol Reed's The Third Man, found via The Playlist: Pulp novelist Holly Martins travels to shadowy, postwar Vienna, only to find himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

DVD Review: UK Release Of “Two Left Feet” (1963) Starring Michael Crawford, Nyree Dawn Porter And David Hemmings From Network

  • CinemaRetro
By Howard Hughes

(The following review is of the UK release of the film on Region 2 format.)

In Roy Ward Baker’s 1960s comedy-drama Two Left Feet, Michael Crawford plays Alan Crabbe, a clumsy and unlucky-in-love 19-year-old who begins dating ‘Eileen, the Teacup Queen’, a waitress at his local cafe. She lives in Camden Town and there are rumours that she’s married, but that doesn’t seem to alter her behavior. Alan and Eileen travel into London’s ‘Floride Club’, where the Storyville Jazzmen play trad for the groovers and shakers. Eileen turns out to be a ‘right little madam’, who is really just stringing Alan along. She’s the kind of girl who only dates to get into places and then starts chatting to randoms once inside. She takes up with ruffian Ronnie, while Alan meets a nice girl, Beth Crowley. But Eileen holds a strange hold over
See full article at CinemaRetro »

British cinema celebrated with new bank of film trivia to coincide with the 58th BFI London Film Festival

Ahead of the 58th BFI London Film Festival, American Express has teamed up with some of Britain’s most influential movie bloggers – including us – to produce a new bank of film trivia celebrating British cinemas rich history.

“There’s so much to celebrate about British film, from iconic locations, multi-award winning production and creative teams to some of the world’s best loved stars,” states Melissa Weber, Vice President Brand and Communications, American Express “People love talking about film and this list should fuel some great discussion, enabling people across the country to get into the spirit of this year’s Film Festival.”

A selection of the facts have been turned into Vine videos to be hosted on Twitter via @AmexUK, using #BritFilmTrivia and will be calling for enthusiasts to trade their favourite facts. Meanwhile, a video has been released with Alex Zane, which you can see below, along with a selection of the trivia…
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Actors Who’ve Played the Same Character the Most Times

  • Cinelinx
With Hugh Jackman currently negotiating to play Wolverine for a seventh and eighth time, Cinelinx takes a look at actors who’ve played the same role eight times or more. Who has played the same character most often? Come in and find out.

Hugh Jackman has already played Wolverine five times--x-Men (2000), X2: X-Men United (2003) X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009), and The Wolverine (2013)—as well as a cameo in X-Men:First Class (2011). Soon we’ll be seeing him fully clawed again on the big screen in X-Men: Days of Future Past. Recently, he told Collider that he might shoot Wolverine 3 and X-Men: Apocalypse “back-to-back”, which would make a total of eight times (9 times with the cameo) that he’ll portray the Canadian mutant.

You might be thinking “Wow! That’s amazing! I’ve never heard of anyone playing the same role so many times.” Well, for those who may not know it,
See full article at Cinelinx »

‘Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Peter Cushing, Shane Briant, Madeline Smith, David Prowse, John Stratton, Michael Ward, Elsie Wagstaff, Patrick Troughton, Philip Voss, Bernard Lee | Written by Anthony Hinds | Directed by Terence Fisher

I often pride myself on the fact that I grew up on Hammer films and many of my favourite moments have come from actors such as Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing. As I watched most of the movies for the first time as a child there were some that never really connected me that much, one of them being Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell. As I’ve grown older though and more mature I’ve discovered that the movies I felt were the weakest of Hammer’s collection of horrors are often their strongest. Now that Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell is making its way to Blu-ray, this is my chance to revisit it and give it a second chance.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Re-Viewed: On Her Majesty's Secret Service, the forgotten Bond classic

Bond 24 confirmed for 2015 release with Sam Mendes returning

James Bond: A history from Ian Fleming to Daniel Craig

On Her Majesty's Secret Service might be the sixth instalment in Eon's James Bond series, but for a long time it had the feel of one of the franchise's rogue entries Casino Royale and Never Say Never Again. Two years after Sean Connery signed off his initial 007 run with You Only Live Twice, producers Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman undertook an exhaustive casting search with director Peter Hunt to find a replacement. They believed, rightly, that the role of James Bond was bigger than anyone who played him, and in 1968 George Lazenby - an Australian model with no prior acting experience - was unveiled as the new James Bond at the Dorchester Hotel.

Lazenby, of course, would only play Bond once and Ohmss's failure to set the box office alight meant
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »
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