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Bernard Fox, ‘Bewitched’ and ‘Titanic’ Actor Dies at 89

  • The Wrap
Bernard Fox, ‘Bewitched’ and ‘Titanic’ Actor Dies at 89
Welsh character actor Bernard Fox died of heart failure at the Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys, California, on Wednesday. He was 89. Fox was best known for playing Dr. Bombay on the cult 1960s comedy “Bewitched,” and as the naive, bumbling Colonel Crittendon on “Hogan’s Heroes” along side Bob Crane. He also appeared in the 1997 disaster epic “Titantic” as Col. Archibald Gracie, and as Captain Winston Havlock in “The Mummy.” Also Read: Leonardo DiCaprio Pays Tribute to 'Growing Pains' Co-Star Alan Thicke: 'I Miss Him Already' Born in Port Talbot, Glamorgan, Wales, to stage-actor parents, Fox was a fifth-generation performer.
See full article at The Wrap »

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81
Irish-born stage and screen actor Peter O’Toole, who became an international star in the title role of David Lean’s Oscar-winning epic “Lawrence of Arabia,” died on Saturday at age 81.

“His family are very appreciative and completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of real love and affection being expressed towards him, and to us, during this unhappy time,” his daughter Katherine O’Toole said in a statement on Sunday. “Thank you all, from the bottom of our hearts.”

O’Toole’s agent, Steve Kenis, said O’Toole was “one of a kind in the very best sense and a giant in his field.”

Showbiz execs, directors and fellow actors have paid tribute to their friend.

Amanda Berry, CEO of BAFTA, said: “His was an outstanding career and he leaves us with cinematic magic in his many films. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.”

Leslie Phillips, who played alongside
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81
Irish-born stage and screen actor Peter O’Toole, who became an international star in the title role of David Lean’s Oscar-winning epic “Lawrence of Arabia,” died on Saturday at age 81.

“His family are very appreciative and completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of real love and affection being expressed towards him, and to us, during this unhappy time,” his daughter Katherine O’Toole said in a statement on Sunday. “Thank you all, from the bottom of our hearts.”

O’Toole’s agent, Steve Kenis, said O’Toole was “one of a kind in the very best sense and a giant in his field.”

Showbiz execs, directors and fellow actors have paid tribute to their friend.

Amanda Berry, CEO of BAFTA, said: “His was an outstanding career and he leaves us with cinematic magic in his many films. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.”

Leslie Phillips, who played alongside
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Network Announces New "British Film Line-up" Titles

  • CinemaRetro
Network Distributing is pleased to announce the next batch of titles within “The British Film” range which will be available in the UK later this year. Each feature once again benefits from a new transfer, an instant play facility and will be presented in special slim-line space-saving packaging. Some of the highlights from October are a documentary about the body narrated by Vanessa Redgrave with music from Roger Waters, more gems from the vaults from Ealing Studios, classic horror, British musicals and a courtroom drama starring Richard Attenborough.

7 October

The Body £9.99

Vanessa Redgrave and Frank Finlay narrate an intimate and innovative documentary from the seventies about the human body cut to music from Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters. Commentary by poet and playwright Adrian Mitchell.

The Final Programme £9.99

Cult director Robert Fuest’s dystopian sci-fi thriller. Robert Finch stars as Jerry Cornelius, a Nobel Prize winning physicist and playboy who
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Alice in Wonderland (1966) - DVD Review

I feel like Sergeant Pepper slipped me some acid. Director Jonathan Miller found an underlying melancholy in the Alice stories by Lewis Carroll. He brought that into a haunting, surreal, dream-like, Victorian adaptation of the story for the BBC. Oh what a curiouser and curiouser trip it.s been. Alice (Anne-Marie Mallik) is spending the day with her sisters in the sunny fields. She appears to nap, but spies a Victorian gentleman White Rabbit (Wilfrid Brambell) and follows him into a tunnel. She finds herself in Wonderland, encountering the Duchess (Leo McKern), growing, shrinking, at a mad tea party with the Mad Hatter (Peter Cook), March Hare (Michael Gough) and Dormouse (Wilfred Lawson), poetry from the Caterpillar (Sir Michael
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Tuesday Morning Foreign Region DVD Report: "Boom!" (Joseph Losey, 1968)

  • MUBI
Unlike some directors who give up on a bad script or else send it up, one senses that you always try to play fair; but in some of those early British films, one also sense a kind of irony behind their worst excesses. Is this so?

"There was, but it was a desperate irony because I was so badly in need of work and under such extreme pressure. This can be dangerous, because Tennessee Williams, for instance, had been told by all sorts of people who are not qualified to comment—people with whom I've never worked and who therefore don't know how I work—that I'm death on writers, that I cut ruthlessly, that I have no respect for a script. This couldn't be more untrue. Of course if I get a script which is a piece of nonsense, I will say that I'll do it only if it
See full article at MUBI »

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