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See the first pictures from BBC Two's Dad's Army origins drama

Don't panic! Your first look at BBC Two's upcoming Dad's Army origins drama is here.

We're Doomed! The Dad's Army Story tells of the struggles creators Jimmy Perry and David Croft had to endure to get the classic comedy on screen.

The stills show Friday Night Dinner's Paul Ritter and Game of Thrones actor Richard Dormer as Perry and Croft, respectively, and John Sessions as a dead ringer for Arthur Lowe.

EastEnders star Shane Richie will play Bill Pertwee in the one-off film, with the rest of the Dad's Army actors portrayed by Julian Sands (as John Le Mesurier), Mark Heap (as Clive Dunn), Kevin Bishop (as James Beck), Michael Cochrane (as Arnold Ridley) and Ralph Riach (as John Laurie).

Meanwhile, Keith Allen will appear as TV executive Paul Fox and Sally Phillips will play Croft's wife Ann.

The drama has been written by Stephen Russell (Shameless) and
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

BBC Two will explore the origins of Dad's Army in a new drama with Shane Richie as Bill Pertwee

There's already a Dad's Army movie remake on the horizon, and now there's going to be a drama based around its origins.

EastEnders star Shane Richie will play Bill Pertwee in BBC Two's Making Dad's Army, a one-off film about the classic and beloved British sitcom.

The drama will focus on the show's original idea in 1967 up until its first broadcast in 1968, and the struggles creators Jimmy Perry and David Croft had to endure to get it on screen.

Friday Night Dinner's Paul Ritter will play Perry, while Game of Thrones actor Richard Dormer will portray Croft.

The rest of the Dad's Army actors will be played by John Sessions (as Arthur Lowe), Julian Sands (as John Le Mesurier), Mark Heap (as Clive Dunn), Kevin Bishop (as James Beck), Michael Cochrane (as Arnold Ridley) and Ralph Riach (as John Laurie).

Meanwhile, Keith Allen will play TV executive Paul Fox,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Looking back at The Avengers

Alex pays a fond return revisit to 1960s classic TV series, The Avengers...

Stylish crime fighting, despicable evil masterminds, a bowler-hatted old Etonian gentleman spy and a series of beautiful leather cat-suited, kinky-booted, no-nonsense heroines. The Avengers had all this and more. What began as a monochrome tape series in January 1961 ran the whole of the Sixties, becoming a colourful slice of period hokum, full of flair, wit and sophistication, yet with its tongue firmly in its cheek.

Always the perfect gentleman, John Steed was played by Patrick Macnee. Originally billed second to the late Ian Hendry, Macnee was still playing Steed over 15 years later when he was teamed with the youthful duo of Joanna Lumley and Gareth Hunt for The New Avengers in 1976. In the 1998 film, the role of Steed was given to Ralph Fiennes and Uma Thurman played Emma Peel. I will say no more about the film.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Dad's Army movie: Who's playing Mainwaring, Pike and co on big screen?

The all-star cast for the big-screen reboot of the classic sitcom Dad's Army has been revealed.

Bill Nighy, Toby Jones and Michael Gambon are among the actors to feature in the film, written by Hamish McColl and directed by Oliver Parker.

The BBC One comedy was created by Jimmy Perry and the late David Croft and originally aired between 1968 and 1977.

Here's our guide of who's playing the seven main platoon members below:

Captain George Mainwaring

Marvellous actor Toby Jones takes on the pompous, patriotic bank manager and pillar of the community Captain George Mainwaring, played by Arthur Lowe in the BBC comedy.

Sergeant Arthur Wilson

Bill Nighy will be playing privately educated, former city banker Sergeant Arthur Wilson, who is of a cheerful and carefree disposition yet exudes an aura of mystery. He's at odds with Captain George Mainwaring over his privileged background.

Wilson was originally played by the late British actor John Le Mesurier.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Dad's Army movie: Who's playing Mainwaring, Pike and co on big screen?

Dad's Army movie: Who's playing Mainwaring, Pike and co on big screen?
The all-star cast for the big-screen reboot of the classic sitcom Dad's Army has been revealed.

Bill Nighy, Toby Jones and Michael Gambon are among the actors to feature in the film, written by Hamish McColl and directed by Oliver Parker.

The BBC One comedy was created by Jimmy Perry and the late David Croft and originally aired between 1968 and 1977.

Here's our guide of who's playing the seven main platoon members below:

Captain George Mainwaring

Marvellous actor Toby Jones takes on the pompous, patriotic bank manager and pillar of the community Captain George Mainwaring, played by Arthur Lowe in the BBC comedy.

Sergeant Arthur Wilson

Bill Nighy will be playing privately educated, former city banker Sergeant Arthur Wilson, who is of a cheerful and carefree disposition yet exudes an aura of mystery. He's at odds with Captain George Mainwaring over his privileged background.

Wilson was originally played by the late British actor John Le Mesurier.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton & Tom Baker

Feature Alex Westthorp 9 Apr 2014 - 07:00

In the next part of his series, Alex talks us through the film careers of the second and fourth Doctors, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker...

Read Alex's retrospective on the film careers of William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, here.

Like their fellow Time Lord actors, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker also shared certain genres of film. Both appeared, before and after their time as the Doctor, in horror movies and both worked on Ray Harryhausen Sinbad films.

Patrick George Troughton was born in Mill Hill, London on March 25th 1920. He made his film debut aged 28 in the 1948 B-Movie The Escape. Troughton's was a very minor role. Among the better known cast was William Hartnell, though even Hartnell's role was small and the two didn't share any scenes together. From the late Forties, Troughton found more success on the small screen,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Forgotten: Don't Let the Bastards Grind You Down

  • MUBI
Even back when Britain was an industrial nation, films about industry were relatively rare: audiences who worked on assembly lines presumably wanted to look at something more glamorous on their night at the pictures. In Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), Albert Finney snarled, "Don't let the bastards grind you down," a neat encapsulation of the working man's political philosophy, whereas I'm Alright Jack (1959) took a dismayed view of the hostile stand-off between Capital and Labor. That Boulting Brothers satire may have adopted a "plague on both your houses" stance, but in fact its sympathy was with management.

The Agitator (1945) is the product of a gentler age: it tries to be sympathetic to everybody, but again there's a hidden conservative bias. Still, as the product of a generation who had just won the war and were looking forward, some of them, to a bright socialist future of free education and health care,
See full article at MUBI »

The Forgotten: Phantom Rides

  • MUBI
Above: Spectacular full-scale derailment from the 1931 version of The Ghost Train (and also the 1941 version).

Arnold Ridley is fondly remembered in the UK as one of the stars of seventies sitcom Dad’s Army, about an incompetent and mainly superannuated group of volunteer soldiers in the WWII home guard, a show which made Ridley a national star at age 72 (it continued until he was 81). His sweetly doddering persona made a brilliant foil to the petulant Arthur Lowe, the dithering John Le Mesurier and gloomy Scot John Laurie.

One day, shooting on location in a graveyard, one of Ridley’s younger co-stars mused, “Hardly worth your leaving, is it, Arnold?” A rather harsh bit of humor: if you find it too mean, take comfort in the fact that the young thesp predeceased Ridley by some years, owing to liver failure. What larks!

But looong before Dad’s Army, Arnold Ridley found
See full article at MUBI »

Dad's Army creator on 'captain of comedy' Arthur Lowe: from the archive, 16 April 1982

Dad's Army scriptwriter Jimmy Perry salutes Arthur Lowe, Captain Mainwaring of the Home Guard, who has died aged 66

It was a wonderful sunny day, as it always seemed to be when we were filming Dad's Army. David Croft and I were standing in a street in Thetford, getting ready for the first shot of the morning when Arthur Lowe said those immortal words: "I want to make it quite clear to you both I refuse to have a bomb in my trousers."

The idea was that an escaped German U-boat officer put a grenade in the waistband of Captain Mainwaring's trousers, then marched behind him, holding a piece of string which was attached to the pin. His line was, "one false move and I pulls ze string." There was a struggle, the pin came out and the grenade fell down inside Mainwaring's trousers.

Dear John Laurie (Private Frazer) then had
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Clive Dunn in Dad's Army: stoicism, charm and furtive sausages

As Corporal Jones, Dunn was Meursault with a dash of Mr Magoo and one of the sweetest characters ever to grace a sitcom

What was most adorable about Corporal Jones, the character the late Clive Dunn immortalised in Dad's Army during the late 1960s and early 1970s, was that he turned left when everybody else turned right. Or right when they turned left. He was out of joint with existence. He was Camus' Meursault with a dash of Mr Magoo.

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But he was more than that. Dunn ventriloquised one of the sweetest characters to ever grace a sitcom. Jones was a storyteller more digressive than Ronnie Corbett: "You're going into the realms of absurdity now," weekly complained his commanding officer Captain Mainwaring as Jones outlined an insane plot to waylay the Hun or crazily embroidered his part in some venerable altercation with Boers.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Blu-ray Review - The Reptile (1966)

The Reptile, 1966.

Directed by John Gilling.

Starring Noel Willman, Jacqueline Pearce, Ray Barrett, Jennifer Daniel and Michael Ripper.

Synopsis:

Following the mysterious death of his brother, Harry Spalding (Ray Barrett) and his wife Valerie (Jennifer Daniel) move to an inherited cottage in small Cornish village with a dark secret.

It is always refreshing to see a film launch straight into the action. No opening narration, no subtitles, no easing us in gently. From the word go, we’re stepping into dangerous territory, as some poor devil wanders about a darkened stately home, a letter in his hand, fear in his eyes. A smiling Malay waits at the foot of the stairs, watching as a shape emerges from the shadows, and sinks its teeth into our man’s neck. He runs, falls down the staircase, foaming at the mouth, his wound turning all sorts of colours you just know skin shouldn’t be.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lost tapes of classic British television found in the Us

Treasure trove of drama from the 'golden age of television' discovered in Library of Congress after more than 40 years

A rediscovered haul of television dramas that has been lost for 40 years or more is set to change the way we think about many of Britain's biggest acting stars.

The extraordinary cache of televised plays – described by experts as "an embarrassment of riches" – features performances from a cavalcade of postwar British stars. The list includes John Gielgud, Sean Connery, Gemma Jones, Dorothy Tutin, Robert Stephens, Susannah York, John Le Mesurier, Peggy Ashcroft, Patrick Troughton, David Hemmings, Leonard Rossiter, Michael Gambon, Maggie Smith and Jane Asher. The tapes have been unearthed in the Library of Congress in Washington DC.

After months of negotiation, the library and the New York-based public service television station Wnet have agreed to allow the British Film Institute in London to showcase the highlights in November, an occasion
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

DVD News: Lost TV horror classic ‘Mystery and Imagination’ comes to UK DVD

Network DVD have announced the UK DVD release of the classic horror series Mystery and Imagination on July 5th 2010. This critically acclaimed and extremely popular anthology series presents a selection of Gothic tales by legendary 19th Century writers: Robert Louis Stevenson’s nihilistic The Suicide Club, Sheridan le Fanu’s Uncle Silas plus Edgar Allen Poe to name but a few, not to mention a most faithful adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

Famous faces and well – known names lend this most chilling collection of tales authenticity and truth. Ian Holm, Denholm Elliot and Patrick Mower are among the many who turn in powerhouse performances for each of the six specially commissioned, featured-length TV plays. Freddie Jones’s performance as the demented pie-maker, Sweeney Todd, lingers in the memory long after the credit has rolled and the television turned off!

This release contains every remaining episode of Mystery and Imagination,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

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