Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 103 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


'The Lobster' bookies favourite to win Cannes Palme d'Or

2 hours ago | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Son of Saul and Carol also strong contenders.

Yorgos LanthimosThe Lobster is the hot favourite to snap up the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival on Sunday (May 24), according to Paddy Power.

The surreal drama, starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, is facing competition from Holocaust drama Son of Saul and Todd HaynesCarol, starring Cate Blanchett in the tale of a lesbian affair in the 1950s.

Having faced some harsh criticism during the festival, Gus Van Sant’s The Sea of Trees starring Matthew McConaughey is a long 20/1 to clinch the top prize, with Maiwenn’s Mon roi bringing up the rear at 40/1.

Click here for Screen’s Cannes reviewsPlame d’Or Winner 2015The Lobster 5/2Saul Fia 5/1Carol 5/1La giovinezza 11/2Chronic 6/1Shan He Gu Ren 6/1Nie Yin Niang 6/1Il racconto dei racconti 7/1Louder Than Bombs 9/1Valley of Love 10/1Umimachi Diary 10/1Dheepan 12/1Sicario 12/1Mia Madre 14/1Macbeth 14/1The Sea of Trees 20/1La loi du marche »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

Permalink | Report a problem


'The Lobster,' 'The Assassin' and 4 other mini-reviews from Cannes

3 hours ago | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Cannes – Even at a more civilized festival such as Cannes it can be hard to catch every single movie in competition.  There are always a few that will slip through the cracks and you can always count on the inevitable life drama moment to rear its ugly head.  Unlike other festivals, Cannes also has less repeat screenings across the board. That also makes things tough for one person to chronicle it all. With less than 24 hours left in the festival we’ve happy to say we've been able to chronicle 10 Cannes selections in depth.  Here are capsule reviews for another six selections you may still be curious about. [Expect full reviews of “Macbeth,” “The Little Prince” and “Chronic” by the end of the weekend as well as some thoughts on whether Oscar stepped out on la Croisette this year.] "Louder Than Bombs" Director: Joachim Trier Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Gabriel Byrne, Amy Ryan, Isabelle Huppert, David Strathairn, David Druid Reaction: Trier’s first English language film is sort of a mixed bag. On the one hand, Trier often has creative and new »

- Gregory Ellwood

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Caine, Keitel and Weisz are at their best in Sorrentino's glorious 'Youth'

6 hours ago | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Cannes - Italian filmmaker Paul Sorrentino has already dipped his toe into the familiar genre of characters of a certain age reminiscing about the good old days with 2013's "The Grand Beauty."  He even won an Oscar for it. Two years later he returns to the Cannes Film Festival with "Youth," a follow up that stands besides "Grand Beauty" thematically while also presenting a decidedly different point of view. “Youth” starts off with The Retrosettes Sister Band performing a cover of Florence + The Machine’s “You Got the Love.”  A contemporary song interpreted in an intentionally retro style and a twist on the old adage “everything old is new again.” In this case, everything new is old again, a theme that may or may not apply to the central characters in Sorrentino’s cinematic opera.   The movie centers on Fred Ballinger (Michael Caine), a legendary British composer and conductor, and »

- Gregory Ellwood

Permalink | Report a problem


Not in Cannes? Stream These 5 Powerful Palme d'Or Winners

21 hours ago | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Who will win the Palme this year? Todd Haynes' lesbian romance "Carol"? Yorgos Lanthimos' macabre future-romance "The Lobster"? Paolo Sorrentino's paean to life and death "Youth"? No question, a few serious contenders have emerged, but we won't know until awards unveil May 24. In the meantime, enjoy these five powerful Palme d'Or winners at home. "Winter Sleep" (2014) Watching Nuri Bilge Ceylan's near-four-hour Turkish drama sounds like a lot of work. And it is. The first time I saw it, it felt like nothing but a series of moving pictures of empty individuals bloviating about life, work, pride, class and intellect. But upon closer inspection, this is a haunting masterpiece of world-building. Ceylan checks us into the Anatolian mountaintop hotel that is a psychological prison for three people — has-been writer/actor Aydin (Haluk Bilginer), his young trophy wife Nihal (Melisa Sozen) and his careworn, trundling sister Necla (Demet Akbag »

- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Buy: Alchemy Catches Yorgos Lanthimos 'The Lobster'

21 May 2015 8:28 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Alchemy, which has already scooped up Gaspar Noé's 3D "Love" and Nanni Moretti's "Mia Madre," has taken Us rights to Oscar-nominated Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos' English-language debut "The Lobster." A love story set in a near-future where single people are arrested and transferred to a Hotel, where they must find a mate in 45 days or be transformed into an animal, this Cannes competition entry stars Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, John C. Reilly, Lea Seydoux, Olivia Colman and Ben Whishaw. Cannes: "Dogtooth" Director Yorgos Lanthimos Scores with Surreal, Macabre 'The Lobster' (Review and Roundup) "There are very powerful emotions happening inside," said Weisz at the press conference. "Yorgos creates a world and a tone where nobody’s over the top in their acting style, in a world where everything is very internal. It’s the opposite of a melodrama, that’s the tone." "There is a lot of melodrama in the. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: 'The Lobster' sells to Us

21 May 2015 2:38 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Alchemy have snapped up the Cannes Competition title.

Alchemy has acquired all Us distribution rights to Yorgos LanthimosThe Lobster, the dark satire starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, which received its world premiere in Competition at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

Jeff Deutchman, Alchemy’s vp of acquisitions, negotiated the deal with Mike Goodridge of Protagonist Pictures and CAA on behalf of the filmmakers.

The film co-stars John C. Reilly, Lea Seydoux, Olivia Colman and Ben Whishaw.

The Lobster is a love story set in the near future where single people, according to the rules of The City, are arrested and transferred to The Hotel. There they are obliged to find a matching mate in 45 days. If they fail, they are transformed into an animal of their choosing and released into The Woods. A desperate Man escapes from The Hotel to The Woods where The Loners live and falls in love, although it is against »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

Permalink | Report a problem


Colin Farrell-Rachel Weisz Cannes Film ‘The Lobster’ Lands at Alchemy

20 May 2015 10:38 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Alchemy has officially captured “The Lobster,” starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, the independent distributor announced Wednesday and as previously reported by TheWrap. Premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, the film is the first English-language effort from Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, whose 2009 film “Dogtooth” was an Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film. The film stars Farrell as a man “whose recovery from an 11-year relationship is complicated by the fact that he lives in a society that can’t abide single people,” wrote TheWrap’s Steve Pond. Also Read: Cannes Review: 'The Lobster' takes Colin Farrell to Funny, »

- Deborah Day and Matt Donnelly

Permalink | Report a problem


Alchemy Catches ‘The Lobster:’ – Cannes

20 May 2015 9:12 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Alchemy picked up U.S. rights to The Lobster, director Yorgos Lanthimos' pic starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz. The competition film came in with hopes of being An Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind.  It became clear The Lobster was a bit trippy to land in the nets of the top tier distributors for a big theatrical release. The film is set in a near future in which single people are jailed and sent to the Hotel, where they must find a mate within 45 days. If they… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: The Lobster Forces Colin Farrell to Find Love

19 May 2015 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

Cannes, France — The days go by so quickly here, and are packed so tightly with movies, that by the time you start rounding the final stretch of the festival — the prizes are announced on Sunday, the 24th — you’ve almost forgotten what you saw in the early days. But I still haven’t forgotten Yorgos Lanthimos’s competition film The Lobster, an absurdist romantic tragicomedy in which Colin Farrell plays a man nearing middle age who suddenly finds himself single. That wouldn’t be so bad if he didn’t live in a society where single people are shipped off to a country hotel, where they must find a suitable mate in 45 days — or else be turned into the animal of their choice and released into the Woods, never to return to the C »

Permalink | Report a problem


Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz Romance ‘The Lobster’ Headed to Alchemy

19 May 2015 6:02 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

The Lobster,” a bizarre tale of romance and animal metamorphosis starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, is close to landing U.S. distribution from Alchemy, an individual close to the negotiations tells TheWrap. Premiering earlier this week at the Cannes Film Festival, the film is the first English-language effort from Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, whose 2009 film “Dogtooth” was an Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film. The film stars Farrell as a man “whose recovery from an 11-year relationship is complicated by the fact that he lives in a society that can’t abide single people,” wrote TheWrap’s Steve Pond from the. »

- Matt Donnelly

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: ‘The Lobster’ Selling to Alchemy (Exclusive)

19 May 2015 5:40 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Alchemy is in final negotiations to acquire U.S. rights to Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Lobster,” Variety has learned. The futuristic love story stars Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Lea Seydoux.

The deal came four days after the film’s world premiere in competition at Cannes. Guy Lodge called the film “wickedly funny” in his review.

It’s the English-language debut of Greek director Lanthimos, who received critical acclaim for “Dogtooth.” The film, which also stars John C. Reilly, Ben Whishaw and Olivia Colman, is a blackly funny love story set in a dystopian near future where single people are arrested and transformed into animals of their choosing if they fail to find a mate within 45 days.

Farrell plays a single man who checks into a hotel to find a mate, then joins a rebel group and falls in love with Weisz’ character.

The Lobster” was shot in Ireland the spring »

- Dave McNary and Ramin Setoodeh

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015: The Lobster is Hilarious and Absurd [Review]

19 May 2015 2:30 PM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

"A love story set in the near future where single people, according to the rules of The City, are arrested and transferred to The Hotel. There they are obliged to find a matching mate in 45 days. If they fail, they are transformed into an animal of their choosing and released into The Woods. A desperate Man escapes from The Hotel to The Woods where The Loners live and falls in love, although it is against their rules."

Funny how, just by reading this synopsis for The Lobster, you know it's a Yorgos Lanthimos movie. The blandly descriptive names are as much his trademark as his acute eye for the mind numbing inanity of our social constructs.

This time the subject of analysis is the position of hormone-enhanced interpersonal-relations as a status defining symbol.

Partne [Continued ...] »

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: 'The Lobster' Director Yorgos Lanthimos Explains Why Name Actors Need to See His Films Before Working With Him

19 May 2015 10:37 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Cannes Review: Yorgos Lanthimos' 'The Lobster' Explores a Crazy World More Familiar Than It Looks In "The Lobster," Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos envisions a world in which being single is illegal and any wayward lawbreakers are transformed into animals of their choosing. While that may sound ridiculous, it's also typical for Lanthimos, the Oscar-nominated director of "Dogtooth" and "Alps," whose movies generally deal with characters pushing the boundaries of the systems around them. Nevertheless, "The Lobster" — which premiered to strong reviews in competition at this year's Cannes Film Festival — marks a step up for the director. It's his first to feature name actors, with Colin Farrell in the lead role as a wayward man who initially resists finding a mate before falling in love with another rebel (Rachel Weisz). The project also marks Lanthimos' inaugural English language feature as he begins a career beyond his native. »

- Eric Kohn

Permalink | Report a problem


BFI opens up co-pro development funding

18 May 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Fund will earmark £250,000 per year of its existing funding toward support for co-productions at the development stage.

The BFI Film Fund is opening up its development funding to include more co-production projects.

The Fund, will earmark £250,000 per year, effective immediately of its existing funding toward support for co-productions at the development stage.

This allocation of funding builds on the BFI’s decision in early 2013 to allocate up to £1m per year for minority co-productions at the production stage. The first project to see fruition from that funding is The Lobster, which premiered in Cannes Competition. 

“It’s been a great year for co-productions in the UK, from The Lobster to Slow West and Brooklyn,” said BFI Head of International Isabel Davis. “Arguably the story at Cannes is the way ambitious UK producers have worked with international talents like Justin Kurzel for Macbeth, Todd Haynes for Carol, and Paolo Sorrentino for Youth. It’s great »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Inside Out’ Review: Pixar Invades Cannes With One of Its Richest, Best Films

18 May 2015 4:31 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Pete Docter‘s “Inside Out” didn’t come to the Cannes Film Festival as a question mark, unlike many of the festival’s other films: Disney and Pixar had already shown the animated film to audiences at CinemaCon in Las Vegas in April. And it didn’t draw as big a crowd to its first press screening at the Grand Theatre Lumiere as a number of films from European auteurs, including Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Lobster” and Nanni Moretti‘s “Mia Madre.” But when the “Inside Out” screening ended shortly after noon on Monday, the cheers that filled the huge theater »

- Steve Pond

Permalink | Report a problem


Producers discuss making of 'The Lobster'

18 May 2015 2:55 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Cannes: Talk held at The UK Film Centre looked at the financing and production of Yorgos Lanthimos’ English-language debut.

“Co-productions, along with market money, are a really good way to go,” said Irish producer Ed Guiney at The Lobster Talent Talk held at The UK Film Centre in Cannes.

Joining in the conversation was fellow Element producing partner Lee Magiday and American producer Ceci Dempsey from Scarlet Films.

The film’s five territory financing structure began in Rotterdam 2013, and was finalised when production started in March 2014.

“We didn’t plan for it to be like this. It just ended up working out. And we were lucky, each of the territories wanted to support [director] Yorgos’ vision.  We didn’t have to compromise creatively,” said Magiday.

Guiney added, “In Ireland, we’re a small country – so we almost always are working with co-productions, particularly the UK. And with Yorgos on board, we immediately had a third country involved.”

Dempsey »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Lobster | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

17 May 2015 5:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Animal Farm: Lanthimos’ Dystopic Dip into RomCom

Greek auteur Yorgos Lanthimos makes an admirable English language debut with The Lobster, set within an original dystopic landscape charting the grim prospects for the monogamous human relationship. Those familiar with the director’s unique black humor from Dogtooth (2009) and Alps (2011) should be pleased to find none of his abilities to be lost in translation. And yet, this latest also feels as if it prizes sly commentary over substance, a cohesion of elements that make his other titles feel a bit more inventive and a bit less belabored. Still, there’s much to admire in this latest work, a bizarre universe unto itself.

David (Colin Farrell) has just been left by his wife. But he lives in a world where it is against the law to be single, so he is forced to check into a hotel where singles have 45 days to »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


Colin Farrell Deconstructs Absurdist Comedy ‘The Lobster’ – Deadline At Cannes

17 May 2015 3:43 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Spoiler alert: Interview reveals certain details about the film The Lobster. While Hollywood has piled on a number of reboots on Colin Farrell’s lap (read Fright Night and Total Recall) the Irish actor continues to revolutionize his craft by playing against his swaggering type in such smart titles as Seven Psychopaths, In Bruges and Ondine. In Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster, Farrell portrays a sensitive, single guy, David, adrift in the middle-age relationship world. He… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Review: Joachim Trier’s ‘Louder Than Bombs’ Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Gabriel Byrne & Isabelle Huppert

17 May 2015 1:32 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The trend at Cannes this year, so far, has been English-language movies from foreign-language directors, often working in the language for the first time. We’ve already seen Matteo Garrone's "Tale Of Tales," and Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Lobster,” with Paolo Sorrentino’s “Youth,” and Michel Franco’s “Chronic” to come. But one of our most anticipated has been “Louder Than Bombs,” the third film, and first set in the U.S, for Norwegian helmer Joachim Trier. The director landed straight on our radars a while back with the dazzling “Reprise,” and proved to be more than a flash in the pan with the devastating “Oslo, August 31st” a few years later, and now he’s making his Cannes Competition debut. And while ‘Bombs’ is already proving to be divisive, I found it another beguiling and fascinating picture from the filmmaker. The opening shot of the film is concerned with birth – Jonah (Jesse Eisenberg, »

- Oliver Lyttelton

Permalink | Report a problem


Films In Competition – Cannes 2015 Trailers

17 May 2015 11:51 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Films In Competition – Cannes 2015 Trailers La Tête Haute (Emmanuelle Bercot) Umimachi Diary (Kore-Eda Hirokazu) Il Racconto Dei Racconti (Matteo Garrone) The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos) Saul Fia (László Nemes) Mia Madre (Nanni Moretti) Sea of Trees (Gus Van Sant) Mon Roi (Maïwenn) Carol (Todd Haynes) La Loi du Marché (Stéphane Brizé) Louder Than Bombs (Joachim Trier) Sicario (Denis Villeneuve) Marguerite & Julien (Valérie Donzelli) Youth (Paolo Sorrentino) Shan He Gu Ren (Jia Zhang-Ke) Dheepan (Jacques Audiard) Nie Yinniang (Hou Hsiao-Hsien) Chronic (Michel Franco) Valley of Love (Guillaume Nicloux) MacBeth (Justin Kurzel) »

- HollywoodNews.com

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 103 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners