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Symphony of the Soil Opens in L.A. Nov. 8

Filmed across four continents the film explores the importance and unknown facts about soil as leading soil scientists, farmers, and activist share their knowledge to provide a broad picture of the issues surrounding the precious resource beneath our feet.

Deborah Koons Garcia’s film focuses on soil as a miraculous and transformative substance, which, with the right care and research, could help solve some of humanity's biggest environmental concerns including climate change, dead zones, water scarcity and world hunger.

Deborah Koons Garcia’s award-winning documentary Symphony of the Soil will be released theatrically in Los Angeles by Lily Films on November 8th at the Laemmle Music Hall.

The filmmaker also points to the indifference shown towards the subject, and how it is a resource often taken for granted and ignored. She combines these serious concerns with a skillful mix of art and science in which soil is revealed to be a living organism, and the foundation of life on earth.

Symphony of the Soil premiered at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History at the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital in 2012. This powerful film received an award from The Life Sciences Film Festival in Prague, Czech Republic, the Merit Award for Scientific Information from the Montana Cine International Film Festival, and the Cinema Verde Film Festival Food Award. In January 2013, Deborah Koons Garcia received the John de Graaf Environmental Filmmaking Award at the Wild and Scenic Film Festival.

Best known for the documentary The Future of Food, on genetically engineered crops and the corporate control of food, the documentarian continues to create films that tackle pressing issues that affect human's relationship with the environment and that will define the survival of future generations.

For more information on the film visit Here
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Film Review: ‘Symphony of the Soil’

Deborah Koons Garcia’s “Symphony of the Soil” reps the latest in a long line of documentaries extolling the many virtues of organic farming over the nefarious legacy of industrial food production — one of which, “The Future of Food,” also helmed by the director herself. This time around, the emphasis falls more on the bounty of well-tended soil and the beauty of growing things (via time-lapse photography and animated watercolor drawings), and less on the plagues of chemical-based agriculture. Soil constitutes the alpha and omega of “Symphony”; how soil’s fertility can be restored echoes the question of how many times the same documentary field can be tilled.

Biologists and geologists trek across the startlingly picturesque landscapes of Norway and Hawaii, literally and figuratively digging down decades, centuries and millennia to show the assorted processes by which soils are formed and their various properties. A slideshow at the center of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Symphony of the Soil is an Educational Endurance Test with Familiar Takeaways

How many dirt metaphors can a viewer endure? The answer, unfortunately, is about 45 minutes' worth. Symphony of the Soil is a feature-length documentary that concerns itself with such universalities as ecosystem sustainability, food production, and environmental conservation, all through the study of soil and its precipitous decay. From the food we eat to the ground we walk on, soil makes it happen. The economic theory of diminishing returns extends to factual retention, and is of particular consideration when it comes to academically inclined environmental documentaries. Despite director Deborah Koons Garcia's mighty effort to create a stimulating and visually engaging product, Symphony plays mostly like a taped lecture. It's a hard sell from the outset, a...
See full article at Village Voice »

Free Documentary of the Week: 'The Future of Food'

Film examines agricultural revolution transforming what's for dinner.

The advent of the agricultural corporation has dramatically changed the food industry and resulted in the near-extinction of one of America's most time-honored ways of living: farming. "Agri-businesses" aren't far from owning copyrights on specific crops; meaning growing certain types of tomatoes would be no different than manufacturing iPods.

'The Future of Food', directed by Deborah Koons Garcia (widow of legendary guitarist Jerry Garcia), gives an eye-opening look at the revolution that's responsible for the genetically modified vegetables and grains that fill store shelves, and how science is quietly changing the food we consume.

Filmed on location across the farms of Mexico, Canada, and the U.S., 'The Future of Food' is a call to awareness for consumers unaware about what they are really eating. Watch the film in full, or snag it onto your own site, from SnagFilms.com.

Watch 'The
See full article at Moviefone »

Cinema Libre eats up 'Food'

Cinema Libre Studio will distribute Deborah Koons Garcia's documentary The Future of Food with assistance from grass-roots outreach firm Good Company Communications. The docu offers an investigation into the corporate food system with a look at unlabeled, patented, genetically engineered foods that have begun to fill grocery store shelves. It will have its U.S. theatrical bow Sept. 14 at Film Forum in New York, followed by a national release. Producer-director Garcia said: "We are very pleased that mainstream audiences across America will have the opportunity to see the film and educate themselves about what is happening to agriculture today. With Cinema Libre Studio and Good Company Communications as partners, we hope to empower audiences to join the healthy food revolution."

Grateful Dawg

A banjo-playing Jerry Garcia and mandolinist David Grisman met in 1964 at a bluegrass gathering in West Grove, Pa. Both were very talented and loved folk and traditional music. Including forming a band in the '70s and producing several albums in the '90s, their friendship endured until Garcia's death in 1995.

Separate from and in crucial ways interwoven with his larger-than-life role as leader of The Grateful Dead, the numerous collaborations between Garcia and Grisman are the focus of Sony Pictures Classics' unpretentiously entertaining documentary "Grateful Dawg", a limited release that screened recently at the Toronto International Film Festival after bowing as a work-in-progress at the 2000 Mill Valley (Calif.) fest. New York-based filmmaker Gillian Grisman, daughter of executive producer Grisman and former video archivist for the Dead, makes no claims of objectivity, and "Dawg" -- with much more "handmade" music than talking and no probing journalistic agenda -- is first and foremost an homage to her father (whose 178-title discography takes up seven pages of the film's media kit) and rock legend Garcia.

Along with concert footage and curios like a previously unreleased 1991 music video of "The Thrill Is Gone", "Dawg" includes informal but watchable video footage that Gillian Grisman and Justin Kreutzmann (son of Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann) took of the musicians in the studio and in more relaxed situations like the elder Grisman's living room.

From the creation of the bluegrass group Old and in the Way to Grisman's contributions to such Deadhead faves as "Friend of the Devil" and "Ripple", the film's subject matter is educational for fans of Garcia. Likewise, many a neophyte of the duo's music will get into such elaborate, beautiful creations as the 17-minute opus "Arabia", a rendition of Jimmy Cliff's "Sittin' Here in Limbo" and a slowed-down version of "Friend of the Devil".

Although there were periods when Garcia and Grisman did not work together, with both having many other projects through the years, a consistent theme of "Dawg" is how these "beards of a feather" complemented each other creatively and even grew to look alike. Among the 20 or so interviewees and participants seen in archival footage is Garcia's widow Deborah Koons Garcia, credited as the film's creative consultant.

GRATEFUL DAWG

Sony Pictures Classics

Acoustic Disc,

11th Hour Productions & Entertainment

Producer-director: Gillian Grisman

Executive producers: Craig Miller, David Grisman

Editor: Josh Baron

Creative consultant: Deborah Koons Garcia

Color/stereo

With: Jerry Garcia, David Grisman

Running time -- 80 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

Grateful Dawg

A banjo-playing Jerry Garcia and mandolinist David Grisman met in 1964 at a bluegrass gathering in West Grove, Pa. Both were very talented and loved folk and traditional music. Including forming a band in the '70s and producing several albums in the '90s, their friendship endured until Garcia's death in 1995.

Separate from and in crucial ways interwoven with his larger-than-life role as leader of The Grateful Dead, the numerous collaborations between Garcia and Grisman are the focus of Sony Pictures Classics' unpretentiously entertaining documentary "Grateful Dawg", a limited release that screened recently at the Toronto International Film Festival after bowing as a work-in-progress at the 2000 Mill Valley (Calif.) fest. New York-based filmmaker Gillian Grisman, daughter of executive producer Grisman and former video archivist for the Dead, makes no claims of objectivity, and "Dawg" -- with much more "handmade" music than talking and no probing journalistic agenda -- is first and foremost an homage to her father (whose 178-title discography takes up seven pages of the film's media kit) and rock legend Garcia.

Along with concert footage and curios like a previously unreleased 1991 music video of "The Thrill Is Gone", "Dawg" includes informal but watchable video footage that Gillian Grisman and Justin Kreutzmann (son of Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann) took of the musicians in the studio and in more relaxed situations like the elder Grisman's living room.

From the creation of the bluegrass group Old and in the Way to Grisman's contributions to such Deadhead faves as "Friend of the Devil" and "Ripple", the film's subject matter is educational for fans of Garcia. Likewise, many a neophyte of the duo's music will get into such elaborate, beautiful creations as the 17-minute opus "Arabia", a rendition of Jimmy Cliff's "Sittin' Here in Limbo" and a slowed-down version of "Friend of the Devil".

Although there were periods when Garcia and Grisman did not work together, with both having many other projects through the years, a consistent theme of "Dawg" is how these "beards of a feather" complemented each other creatively and even grew to look alike. Among the 20 or so interviewees and participants seen in archival footage is Garcia's widow Deborah Koons Garcia, credited as the film's creative consultant.

GRATEFUL DAWG

Sony Pictures Classics

Acoustic Disc,

11th Hour Productions & Entertainment

Producer-director: Gillian Grisman

Executive producers: Craig Miller, David Grisman

Editor: Josh Baron

Creative consultant: Deborah Koons Garcia

Color/stereo

With: Jerry Garcia, David Grisman

Running time -- 80 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

See also

Credited With | External Sites