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Alexander Knox (I) More at IMDbPro »

Other works
(September 24, 1998) Posthumous publication of the book, "On Actors and Acting: Essays by Alexander Knox," edited and with an introduction by Anthony Slide; published by Scarecrow Press, an imprint of Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, Maryland, USA. A collection of Alexander Knox's essays, some previously published and and some previously unpublished, on various performers with whom he worked or was familiar, and on the art and craft of acting.

Active on Broadway in the following productions:

(December 1, 1949 - December 17, 1949) "The Closing Door," original melodrama; written by Alexander Knox; produced by Cheryl Crawford; directed by Lee Strasberg; with Ronald Alexander (portraying Basil Johnson in his final Broadway role); Lonny Chapman (portraying Guard); Eva Condon (portraying Grandma), Richard Derr (portraying Doctor Ed Harriman); Jack Dimond (as Jack Dimond) (portraying David Trahern); Randolph Echols (portraying Don), Alexander Knox (portraying Vail Trahern in his last Broadway play and role); Doris Nolan (portraying Norma Trahern in her final Broadway role); Alan Norman (portraying Hector Trahern); John Shellie (portraying Ollie Stevenson); and Jo Van Fleet (portraying Connie) in the cast; on Broadway at the Empire Theatre (demolished 1953), Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (22 performances, unknown previews).

(December 21, 1942 - April 3, 1943) "The Three Sisters," dramatic revival; written by Anton Chekhov; translated by Aleksandr Kerensky and Guthrie McClintic; produced by Katharine Cornell; staged and directed by Guthrie McClintic; with Judith Anderson (portraying Olga, Andrei's sister); Stanley Bell (portraying Fedotik, Second Lieutenant); Alice Belmore (as Alice Belmore Cliffe)(portraying Nurse); Patricia Calvert (portraying Maid); Arthur Chatterdon (portraying Ferapont, Courier for the City Council); Katharine Cornell (portraying Masha, Andrei's sister); Walter Craig (portraying Soldier); Kirk Douglas (portraying An Orderly in his Broadway debut); Eric Dressler (portraying Andrei Prozorov); Ruth Gordon (portraying Natalya Ivanovna, Andrei's fiancée/wife); Edmund Gwenn (portraying Chebutykin, Army doctor); Dennis King (portraying Vershinin, Lt. Colonel, Battery Commander); Alexander Knox (portraying Baron Tuzenbach, Lieutenant); Tom McDermott (portraying Rode, Second Lieutenant); McKay Morris (portraying Solyony, Captain); Gertrude Musgrove (portraying Irina, Andrei's Sister); Marie Paxton (portraying Maid); and Tom Powers (portraying Kulygin, Masha's husband) in the cast; on Broadway at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (123 performances, unknown previews).

(January 21, 1942 - May 9, 1942) "Jason," original drama; written and directed by Samson Raphaelson; produced by George Abbott; with Richard Conte (as Nicholas Conte); Raymond Greenleaf; Ellen Hall; Abraham Knox; Alexander Knox; E.G. Marshall; Eulabelle Moore; William Niles; Tom Tully; Helen Walker; and Edna West in the cast; on Broadway at the Hudson Theatre (now a hotel conference center), Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (125 performances, unknown previews).

(September 9, 1940 - September 28, 1940) "Jupiter Laughs," original drama; written by A.J. Cronin (as Dr. A.J. Cronin); directed by Reginald Denham; Carl Harbord (portraying Dr. George Thorogood); Charles Jordan (portraying Albert Chivers); Alexander Knox (portraying Dr. Paul Venner); Reginald Mason (portraying Dr. Richard Drewett); Edith Meiser (portraying Matron Fanny Leeming); Esther Mitchell (portraying Martha Foster); Mary Orr (portraying Jennie); Nancy Sheridan (portraying Gladys Bragg); Jessica Tandy (portraying Dr. Mary Murray); and Philip Tonge (portraying Dr. Edgar Bragg) in the cast; on Broadway at the Biltmore Theatre (the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre since 2008), Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (24 performances, unknown previews).

(May 9, 1940 - June 8, 1940) "Romeo and Juliet," tragedy revival; written by William Shakespeare; production design, produced, and directed by Laurence Olivier; scenic and costume design by Sophie Devine (as Motley); lighting design by Robert Edmond Jones; incidental music by Alexander Steinert and Laurence Olivier; with Virginia Burchfield, Mary Kane, Patricia Knight, Vivien Leigh (as "Juliet, daughter to Capulet"), Nancie B. Marsland (as "A Cook"), Laurence Olivier (as "Romeo, son of Montague), Charles Prescott, Howard Stark, Wesley Addy (as "Benvolio, nephew to Montague and friend to Romeo"), William Barrows, Ralph Brooke, Walter Brooke, Hazel Brown, Robert Busch, Oliver Cliff, Frank Downing, H. Robert Edwards, Brant Gorman, Wilton Graff, Ralph Grayson, Earle Grey, Halliwell Hobbes (as "Capulet"), Barbara Horder, Ted Huish, Raymond Johnson, Alexander Knox (as "Friar Laurence, a Franciscan) [Broadway debut], Charles Martin, Jack Merivale, Nan Merriman, Edmond O'Brien (as "Mercutio, kinsman to the prince and friend to Romeo), Tileston Perry, Joan Shepard, Clara Speer, Morton Stevens (as "Watchman/Old Capulet/Friar John, a Franciscan"), John Straub, Joseph Tomes, Katherine Warren, Ben Webster, Dame May Whitty (as "Nurse to Juliet"), and Cornel Wilde (as "Tybalt, nephew to Lady Capulet" in his final Broadway role) in the cast; on Broadway at the 51st Street Theatre (closed 1989), Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (36 performances, unknown previews).

(April 1937) "Anna Christie," written by Eugene O'Neill; directed by Michael Macowan; with Flora Robson; Alexander Knox; Mark Dignam; Marie Ault; Philip King; and Niall MacGinnis in the cast; on the West End at the Westminster Theatre, London, England, UK.

(1938) He acted in James Bridie's play, "Babes in the Wood," at the Embassy Theatre in London, England with Angela Baddeley, Louise Hampton, Ellen Pollock, and Richard Caldicott in the cast. Dennis Arundell was director.

(1938) He acted in George Bernard Shaw's play, "Geneva," at the Saville Theatre in London, England with Ernest Thesiger, Cecil Trouncer, Walter Hudd, and Alison Legatt in the cast.

(1937-1938) He acted in James Bridie's play, "The King of Nowhere," at the Old Vic Theatre in London, England with Laurence Olivier, Stephen Murray, Vivienne Bennett, Marda Vanne, and Sylvia Coleridge in the cast. Tyrone Guthrie was director.

(1937-1938) He acted in William Shakespeare's play, "Othello," at the Old Vic Theatre in London, England with Ralph Richardson, Laurence Olivier, Anthony Quayle, Martita Hunt, Andrew Cruickshank, and Stephen Murray in the cast. Tyrone Guthrie was director.

(April 25, 1938) He acted at the Shakespeare Birthday Festival at the Old Vic Theatre in London, England with Michael Redgrave, Donald Wolfit, Jessica Tandy, Sybil Thorndike, Lewis Casson, Russell Thorndike, Baliol Holloway, Cecil Trouncer, Harcourt Williams, Vivienne Bennett, Wilfred Walter, Marie Ney, Alec Clunes, Andrew Cruickshank, Frank Napier, George Hayes, Leo Genn, Malcolm Keen, Margaretta Scott, Marius Goring, Stephen Murray, William Devlin, and Tyrone Guthrie in the cast. Tyrone Guthrie was director.

(1952-1953) He acted in William Shakespeare's play, "Henry VIII," at the Old Vic Theatre in London, England with Paul Rogers and Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies in the cast. Tyrone Guthrie was director.

(1952-1953) He acted in the Old Vic Theatre season at the Old Vic Theatre in London, England with Peter Finch, Claire Bloom, Alan Badel, Paul Rogers, Irene Worth, Robert Donat, Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies, Laurence Payne, Robin Bailey, William Devlin, Jack May, Edgar Wreford, Richard Pasco, Daphne Heard, Phyllida Law, Andree Melly, Alan Dobie, James Maxwell, Douglas Rain, and Eric Thompson in the cast. Hugh Hunt was director.

(July 1953) He acted in the Old Vic Company production of William Shakespeare's play, "Henry VIII," at the Opera House Theatre in Manchester, England with Paul Rogers, Alexander Knox, Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies, Robert Eddison, Eric Thompson, Patrick Wymark, David Waller, Alan Dobie, Margaret Courtenay, and Phyllida Law in the cast. Tyrone Guthrie was director.

(May 6, 1953) He acted in a Royal Command Performance of William Shakespeare's play, "Henry VIII," at the Old Vic Theatre in London, England with Paul Rogers and Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies in the cast. Tyrone Guthrie was director. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was in attendance.


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