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Video: 5 Best Sword-Fights in Movies

23 June 2017 10:04 AM, PDT | The Cultural Post | See recent The Cultural Post news »

Sword fights. Everyone loves a good sword fight. They combine the best thing about chess – the strategy and fitness of a well-timed and executed move – with the ferocity of a wrestling match. Plus, they’re normally really well scored. They’re like a dance off with more equipment and less impressive footwork. With that in mind, we thought that it’s important to take a couple of minutes to go through five of the best sword fights in movies.

5. Aragorn Vs The Nine Ringwraiths – The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

While the Hobbit films were somewhat “less than stellar” there’s no doubt that Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films were, on the whole, quite good. The Fellowship of the Ring especially. There were a lot of things in that film that worked really well – Saruman’s new orcs, the Balrog, the secret council, but the thing that really sold the film was the battle between Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) and the Ringwraiths. It may have been short, but it set the tone for the film and it ends with an evil ghost getting a flaming torch to the face. What more does a film need than that?

4. Captain Jack Sparrow Vs Captain Hector Barbosa – Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003)

Geoffrey Rush, playing the role of Hector Barbosa, described this fight as an epic battle between two immortals and is it ever. The choreography is pure Flynn-like. It’s over the top and quicker than a ship at full mast. Intercut with this scene is another sword fight: Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) versus the undead crew of the Black Pearl. Plus, bringing back what we said about being really well scored, Hans Zimmer is on point with the theme for both this fight and the entire scene. The series may have gone off the map in later films, but The Curse of the Black Pearl really was treasure.

3. Hector Vs Achilles – Troy (2004)

Okay, so this one is definitely a controversial choice. Classics Students hate this film because it’s not the Illiad; Lord of the Rings fans hate it because Legolas (Orlando Bloom) is a coward in it; and cinema-philes hate it because… Well, its quality is debatable. But, 2004’s Troy is notable because: every single actor seems to be chewing the scenery in every single scene and it has Eric Bana and Brad Pitt fighting with spears. Taking place the day after Hector (Bana) killed Patroclus – Achilles’ cousin-in-this-version-but-lover/protege-in-the-Illiad, it features some of the best choreography in a film that’s pretty much built upon its sword-to-sword choreography and the bankability of Brad Pitt. The fact that most of the fight is actually one that’s between two spear wielders – something which is rare in the medium, for some reason – only makes the whole thing even better. Plus, Pitt’s Achilles really lays on the smack talk. Hard.

2. The Bride Vs The Crazy 88 – Kill Bill, Vol. 1 (2003)

As the titular Bill (David Carradine) says in Kill Bill Vol. 2, Uma Thurman’s character wasn’t really fighting eighty-eight bodyguards during this fight. According to the Kill Bill Wiki, there are only forty-four of them. Still, that’s a considerable number of bodyguards for one woman to fight by herself and  Thurman does it stylishly. She’s called the world’s deadliest woman throughout the film, but it’s this scene in which the thesis is tested. It’s one of the most stylish scenes Quentin Tarantino ever shot and we’d argue still holds up compared to his later work. There’s so much to say about this fight but we’ll just let the fact that the Bride fought forty-four bodyguards (as well as two bosses) and won speak for itself.

1. Luke Skywalker Vs Darth Vader – Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983)

There were a lot of options that we could have gone with for our ultimate battle of the blades. Hell, there were a lot of options we could have gone with from the Star Wars franchise. But, after going through all seven films again, we’ve decided that the top of them all has to be what was – for a long time – the final battle in the Star Wars trilogy. While not as technically flashy or quick as some of the fights from the prequel trilogy, the fight between Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and Darth Vader (David Prowse/James Earl Jones) more than makes up for it in terms of both emotional impact, thematic appropriateness, and score. And wow, what a score it is. John Williams is known for his scores but we think this just takes the cake.

Are there any sword-fights you think we missed? Let us know in the comments below. »

- Ian Bailey

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The Journey – Filmmaker Nick Hamm Discusses His New Film

23 June 2017 6:23 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“We are Ireland. We are inevitable.”

Each summer, while the multiplexes are filled with the big spectacles and epic blockbusters, the little gems that grip us with their humor, their tragedy and their humanity, manage to find their ways into the cinemas. This year it’s The Journey, the gripping account of how two men from opposite sides of the political spectrum came together to change the course of history.

In 2006, amidst the ongoing, decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland, representatives from the two warring factions meet for negotiations. In one corner is Ian Paisley (Timothy Spall), the deeply conservative British loyalist; in the other is Martin McGuinness (Colm Meaney), a former Irish Republican Army leader who has devoted his life to the cause of Irish reunification. Opposites in every way, the two men at first seem to have little chance of ever finding common ground. But over the course of an impromptu, detour-filled car ride through the Scottish countryside, each begins to see the other less as an enemy, and more as an individual—a breakthrough that promises to at last bring peace to the troubled region.

Driven by two virtuoso central performances, The Journey is a more-relevant-than-ever reminder of how simple humanity can overcome political division. Freddie Highmore, Toby Stephens, Catherine McCormack and John Hurt co-star. (Review)

I recently spoke with the director of The Journey, award winning director Nick Hamm. Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Hamm directed cult-classic The Hole (2001), starring Thora Birch and Keira Knightley, in her feature film debut. He also helmed Lionsgate’s thriller Godsend (2004), starring Robert DeNiro, Rebecca Romijn and Greg Kinnear.

Hamm later produced and directed the 80’s U2-centric comedy, Killing Bono (2011) for Paramount Pictures and Northern Ireland Screen, starring Ben Barnes, Robert Sheehan and Pete Postelwaite.

During our discussion about his latest movie, the British director and I talked about the film’s mixture of tension and humor, the human story and the message of The Journey.

We Are Movie Geeks: The Journey is a good story that should be told – the type that audiences don’t see anymore. It opened in 2016 in Toronto and then Venice, and finally had its premiere at the Belfast Film Festival in May 2017. What was the crowd’s reaction and how was it received?

Nick Hamm: That was a really extraordinary event. I’ve seen it now with thousands of people watching the movie and if you’re going to see a movie like this, you really need to take it back to Northern Ireland to see what they make of it. In the end, that’s where the authenticity of the film is. It is important to us. The event was attended by nearly a thousand people and political leaders from both sides of the community came so we had politicians from Sinn Féin and politicians from the Democratic Unionist Party (Dup). It was a very emotional and momentous event because in many respects it reminded people of something that they had achieved and had risked losing.

We Are Movie Geeks: It is such an interesting script by writer Colin Bateman, one that is funny, sad, and dramatic. Tell me about lead actors Timothy Spall (Paisley) and Colm Meaney (McGuinness – who died recently in March) and the casting. Their characters became known as ”the Chuckle Brothers”. Both actors were very impressive to watch.

Nick Hamm: What underscores everything is the fact that Colin’s script is so good and when that happens, you attract really good actors. Both Tim and Colm were fantastic partners on the film. Tim had to transform himself – he’s playing a six foot five, Northern Irish politician when in reality he’s a five foot nine London actor. We did some prosthetics on his chin and a little aging on his hair, along with the false teeth. The hair and makeup was done by Polly McKay. Tim became the character of Paisley which was fascinating to watch and he’s one of those actors that totally transforms himself.

Colm is one of Ireland’s best actors. What was important was to find somebody who could give McGuinness sympathy.  This is a man whose background is well documented.  What do you do?  You start by making him human, you give him a life and a backstory.  When you put someone like Colm Meany in that role, Colm transforms himself for that.  He understands the culture from where that character comes, he understands the basis of that character’s ideology and he understands how that character ticks.  If you have that and you are a good actor – which he is, then you have a good combination. It was great to watch him.

We Are Movie Geeks: I was very pleased to see the late John Hurt in the film in what was one of his final roles.

Nick Hamm: We all knew that John was very sick while he was doing the film. When we offered him the movie, he wanted to work until the end and play the part. It was real tribute to have him involved as a part of the film.

We Are Movie Geeks: Irish writer Seamus Heaney, although not a political animal was an artist like yourself. He was affected by “The Troubles” when his cousin Colum was killed as a result of the war – Heaney moved from Northern Ireland to Southern Ireland after that. Has it affected you in any way and was this a partial reason why you made the film?

Nick Hamm: It hasn’t affected me personally but I knew people who were. Growing up I was in school in Northern Ireland and I knew people who had real problems. I could see it with my own eyes, the difficulties back then, and it was an intense situation. The vast portion of the people in Northern Ireland went on about their daily life unaffected by it. The real heroes were the people who got on with their daily lives in that situation.

The Journey for me shows how a unique political friendship was achieved at the personal cost of both men. Both men were vilified by their respective communities, but it was one of the most unique political friendships that I had ever witnessed. For two people who were so antagonistic towards each other, who ultimately came to respect each other, and became friends with each other, is why I made the movie and to tell their story.

We Are Movie Geeks: Despite technically being set in Scotland, and on a plane, The Journey was filmed in Northern Ireland. There’s no green screen and it was filmed on the road with your director of photography Greg Gardiner. What was the approach when you took it out of the plane and into the car?

Nick Hamm: This device protected the claustrophobia that the film so demanded while allowing a political version of a road movie to take place.  We decided to not be frightened by the tyranny of the car but rather embrace it and enjoy the conceit.  Greg and I had discussed and ultimately rejected the idea of green-screen or back-projection very early. We filmed on the road, creating a ‘mobile studio’; our own little cinematic microcosm

We Are Movie Geeks: There is one scene in particular, where McGuiness and Paisley let down their defenses somewhat, set inside a church and then out in the cemetery, that has real depth.

Nick Hamm: I think in the cemetery scene when Colm breaks down, everyone expects Paisley to be sympathetic and wrap his arms around him, but he rebuffs him and shows him no pity or sympathy. Every scene was like a boxing match with each character winning a round.

We Are Movie Geeks: I appreciated the sound editing and especially the score from Stephen Warbeck who first became known for the music for “Prime Suspect” and won an Academy Award for his score for Shakespeare in Love. It is a really nice score.

Nick Hamm: It was something quite new for him and he really had a go at it.

We Are Movie Geeks: Did you speak to the families and to some of the individuals involved? And what was their reaction?

Nick Hamm: I met McGuiness before he died. The whole film came together very quickly from the start.. From the script to the financing, it was out in about two and a half years. It’s been a very quick process and very rare for an independent film. I did sit with McGuiness before we started filming about his friendship with Paisley and it was fascinating to hear him speak how important the relationship was and how important it was that they maintained contact up to its logical conclusion. I did talk to Paisley’s family and to his son. We wanted to reassure them we were not riding roughshod over the history. But at the same time it was important to be creatively independent. We did not share the screenplay with them at any stage. In the end both families really loved the movie.

Plus Sinn Féin and the Dup (Democratic Unionist Party) really liked the film, which is almost unheard of, both parties liking the same thing never mind the same movie. The most important thing for us was that the story was balanced.

We Are Movie Geeks: Brexit is seemingly in the news all the time now. As a result, checkpoints could be set up again to control borders. The timing of the film and its release couldn’t be more relevant. Will it cause a major headache between Northern Ireland and Ireland? Will it hinder Ireland’s reunification?

Nick Hamm: The question needs to be asked and it’s a dreadful situation. The idea that there will be a border back in Ireland again, I don’t think anybody wants that. I know for a fact that the Dup doesn’t want that and it would be suicide for both the economy and the welfare of the people to start putting border checks back up. That border in Ireland runs through people’s fields and farms. It was never designed to be a hard border, which it was during “The Troubles”. It would be an unmitigated tragedy to go back to that.

We Are Movie Geeks: Speaking of Indie Films, what are your thoughts on how people see films? Many are leaving the cinemas in favor of watching a film at home or on the computers with the advent of Netflix and Hulu, etc.

Nick Hamm: I like that at the beginning of a movie’s life that it has a public screening. I think the ways a film is distributed these days is really fascinating. I don’t distinguish between how and where a movie is watched. It’s changing so quickly, in five years-time it’ll change all again. Even the act of going to a movie theater is going to change. As long as they keep putting out these huge blockbuster films, in the cinemas is the best way to watch them. However some films work better on a smaller screen. I think screen size some people can get very worked up about.

We Are Movie Geeks: What’s your next project?

Nick Hamm: We are going to do the DeLorean story, Driven. It’s through the eyes of the guy who gave him up to the FBI. We’re hoping to shoot in September in Puerto Rico. The script is from The Journey’s Colin Bateman. Jason Sudeikis, Lee Pace and Timothy Olyphant are in the picture.

Synopsis:

Driven is the turbo-charged story about the FBI sting operation to entrap maverick car designer John DeLorean.

Sudeikis stars as Jim Hoffman, a con artist-turned-informer for the FBI in the war on drugs. Olyphant plays his handler, determined to snare the world-famous but enigmatic DeLorean (Pace) — desperate for cash to finance his dream of designing the ultimate car of the future — in a drug deal that would become the most lurid celebrity scandal of the 1980s.

From IFC Films, see The Journey in theaters now.

The post The Journey – Filmmaker Nick Hamm Discusses His New Film appeared first on We Are Movie Geeks. »

- Michelle Hannett

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An Indian Summer Takes Over Eventim Apollo August 12th with film screenings and more!

22 June 2017 12:32 PM, PDT | Bollyspice | See recent Bollyspice news »

On Saturday 12th August 2017 the Eventim Apollo will open its doors to a multi-sensory extravaganza recreating the sights and sounds of India. Offering a fun filled day out for all the family, An Indian Summer will immerse visitors in the richness and vibrancy of Indian culture – plunging people into the backstreets of New Delhi and celebrating the heritage, styles and tastes of this South Asian country.

In the year that sees the celebration of UK-India Culture, An Indian Summer will bring Asian diversity to the grandiose setting of an iconic British venue. With the inside of the Eventim Apollo being transformed, visitors will be treated to live Bollywood dance performances, Indian henna artistry as well as a foodie fest comprising of Indian street food-inspired stalls both inside and outside the venue, plus much more.

The focal point of the inaugural event will be the screening of two much loved films that bring together the best of British Asian and contemporary Bollywood cinema. The day commences with a matinee screening of Gurinder Chadha’s evergreen, girl power sports comedy set in Southall, Bend It Like Beckham, starring Parminder Nagra, Keira Knightley, Jonathan Rhys-Meyers, Archie Panjabi and Anupam Kher.

Welcoming in the Indian Summer evening will be a screening of the sassy and youthful romantic comedy-drama, Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani, directed by new wave filmmaker, Ayan Mukerji, and starring Ranbir Kapoor, Deepika Padukone, Kalki Koechlin and Aditya Roy Kapur. Audiences will be invited to singalong to the timeless and anthemic soundtrack as they immerse themselves in the cinematic experience presented by one of the Capital’s most celebrated live event venues. For those wishing to dance the night away there will also be an exclusive after party with guest DJs held in the upper bar.

Come dressed in your best Indian Summer outfits and prepare to fall in love with the multi-sensory experience of India on London’s doorstep as An Indian Summer makes its grand entry on the annual events calendar – a date with the family that’s not to be missed! Tickets on sale 9am Friday 23rd June www.eventimapollo.com

Saturday 12th August

Matinee 12pm

Evening 6pm

For moer information: http://www.eventimapollo.com/events/detail/an-indian-summer

Ticket Purchases: Eventimapollo.com, Eventim.co.uk Axs.com, Ticketmaster.co.uk

Join the conversation: #IndianSummer »

- Stacey Yount

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Eleanor Tomlinson Cast In ‘Colette’; Vlad Alexis Boards ‘Code 8’

21 June 2017 10:10 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Eleanor Tomlinson has joined the Wash Westmoreland-directed biopic Colette, starring Keira Knightley and Dominic West. Co-written by Westmoreland and the late Richard Glatzer with revisions by Rebecca Lenkiewicz, the film follows Gabrielle Sidonie Colette (Knightley), whose husband, the charismatic egomaniacal writer Willy (West), permits Colette to write her novels using his name. The phenomenal success of her Claudine novel series makes Willy a famous writer and the… »

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Ryan Reynolds Shares First Set Photo From Deadpool 2, Features X-Men Mansion

17 June 2017 1:33 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Cable and Domino are, without question, the two headline-worthy additions to David Leitch’s anti-hero sequel, Deadpool 2, and the former in particular has generated a metric ton of buzz among the comic book community ever since the Merc With a Mouth first teased the advent of Wade Wilson’s long-time nemesis last year.

In typically flippant fashion, Ryan Reynolds’ foul-mouthed protagonist rhymed off a series of big names including Mel Gibson, Dolph Lundgren, and, er, Keira Knightley. But it turns out the Powers That Be have selected Josh Brolin (Avengers: Infinity War) to play the time-travelling mercenary known as Nathan Summers. Brolin beat out a whole host of actors to land the coveted gig, too, after reports claimed that Pierce Brosnan and Stephen Lang were both in contention at one point or another.

Alas, now that Fox and director David Leitch have made their decision, fans can begin to »

- Matt Joseph

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Jane Austen-Centric Musical Lab “Austen’s Pride” to Be Held in NYC

14 June 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

2005’s “Pride and Prejudice

Everyone knows Jane Austen is a master of wit, but as a new musical suggests, she also has serious vocal chops. BroadwayWorld reports that an invitation-only musical lab called “Austen’s Pride” will be held June 19 and 20 at the 5th Avenue Theatre in New York City. The project from writer-composers Lindsay Warren Baker and Amanda Jacobs centers on Austen (Lisa O’Hare, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder”) as she reflects on her most famous novel, “Pride and Prejudice.”

“Austen’s Pride” sees the author searching for new inspiration. “Her latest work has sold out and become a huge success, which has her publisher looking for another manuscript,” BroadwayWorld summarizes. “Jane’s sister Cassandra (Courtney Balan, ‘Falsettos’) suggests that she revisit one of her earlier manuscripts, ‘First Impressions.’ To please her sister, Jane revisits her earlier manuscript and as the characters come to life on stage, she discovers them evolving and changing alongside her. By the end of the musical, she has come to learn who she is as a writer and as a woman.” The lab will also feature Kara Lindsay (“Wicked”) as Elizabeth Bennet and Ryan Silverman (“Phantom of the Opera”) as Mr. Darcy.

Pride and Prejudice” was first published in 1813 and traces the passionate sparring and eventual romance between Miss Lizzie Bennet and Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy. The beloved book has received dozens of screen adaptations and retellings including the 1995 miniseries toplined by Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth, Sharon Maguire’s 2001 romantic comedy “Bridget Jones’s Diary,” and the 2005 feature film starring Keira Knightley. Its most recent iteration was last year’s “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,” a supernatural-horror take on the novel toplined by “Downton Abbey’s” Lily James. A modern, Texas debutante ball-set retelling of the classic is being developed at Warner Bros.

Go to the “Austen’s Pride” website to learn more about the musical.

Jane Austen-Centric Musical Lab “Austen’s Pride” to Be Held in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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How ‘Big Little Lies’ (and Improvised Sex Scenes) Turned Alexander Skarsgård Into an Awards Contender — Career Watch

12 June 2017 10:42 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors. In this edition we tackle Alexander Skarsgård, who’s advancing his career with a canny combo of studio movies, indie films, and premium television.

Bottom Line: You never know where you stand with Skarsgård, who has the complexity of a character actor beneath the leading-man looks that launched a thousand memes. (Reads one: “Research shows that if you’re afraid of spiders, you are more likely to find one in your bedroom… I’m really afraid of Alexander Skarsgård.”)

His muscular swagger and danger is on display in “The Legend of Tarzan,” but his tender attentions to wife Jane (Margot Robbie) were that film’s throbbing heart. And in the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” he holds his own with an ensemble of powerful women including executive producer Nicole Kidman, who performs an »

- Anne Thompson

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How ‘Big Little Lies’ (and Improvised Sex Scenes) Turned Alexander Skarsgård Into an Awards Contender — Career Watch

12 June 2017 10:42 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors. In this edition we tackle Alexander Skarsgård, who’s advancing his career with a canny combo of studio movies, indie films, and premium television.

Bottom Line: You never know where you stand with Skarsgård, who has the complexity of a character actor beneath the leading-man looks that launched a thousand memes. (Reads one: “Research shows that if you’re afraid of spiders, you are more likely to find one in your bedroom… I’m really afraid of Alexander Skarsgård.”)

His muscular swagger and danger is on display in “The Legend of Tarzan,” but his tender attentions to wife Jane (Margot Robbie) were that film’s throbbing heart. And in the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” he holds his own with an ensemble of powerful women including executive producer Nicole Kidman, who performs an »

- Anne Thompson

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For Better, for Worse: Celebrity Brides Who Wore Unconventional Wedding Dresses

7 June 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Unless you're marrying royalty, you're technically free to wear anything you want on your wedding day—so isn't it funny how so many women end up wearing a variation of the same long, white dress? Not that there isn't still plenty of appeal in the classic fairy tale vibe, and there are increasingly more styles to play with. But in increasing numbers these days, brides are going with less traditional looks, whether they're shaking up the silhouette, playing with length, or eschewing white—and skirts—altogether. "I'd worn the dress lots. It was my something old," Keira Knightley reminisced about the flirty, blush-colored Chanel frock she chose for her 2013 »

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‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales’ Crosses $500 Million at Global Box Office

4 June 2017 8:16 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Strong international numbers, especially in China, have powered Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” past the $500 million at the global box office.

The fifth installment in the franchise opened at number one at the domestic box office during what was the slowest Memorial Day Weekend in nearly two decades. In two weekends domestically, the movie has earned $114.6 million. That leaves the remaining $386.6 million to overseas earnings to reach its current worldwide sum, $501.2 million. »

- Seth Kelley

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‘Akira’ Should Avoid Whitewashing, Says ‘Atlanta’ Director Hiro Murai

2 June 2017 7:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Hiro Murai has words of advice for whoever plans to take on the live-action “Akira” remake: don’t whitewash.

“Not just because of the backlash lately, but that story is so tied to post-war Japan and ideology,” he said in an interview with IndieWire. “I think it’d be a shame, it’d be a missed opportunity [to cast non-Asians].”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ to Akira Kurosawa: How FX’s Most In-Demand Director Learned His Visual Storytelling Style

Akira” began as manga in 1982 and was adapted into an anime film six years later. Taking place 37 years after a nuclear explosion starts World War III, the story centers on the new city called Neo-Tokyo, which is beset by anti-government terrorism and gang violence. Shotaro Kaneda leads a local biker gang who has to stop his friend Tetsuo Shima from using his newly awakened psionic powers. The fierce Kei is a member of the »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Akira’: Rumored Live-Action Director Is Against Whitewashing

2 June 2017 7:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hiro Murai has words of advice for whoever plans to take on the live-action “Akira” remake: don’t whitewash.

“Not just because of the backlash lately, but that story is so tied to post-war Japan and ideology,” he said in an interview with IndieWire. “I think it’d be a shame, it’d be a missed opportunity [to cast non-Asians].”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ to Akira Kurosawa: How FX’s Most In-Demand Director Learned His Visual Storytelling Style

Akira” began as manga in 1982 and was adapted into an anime film six years later. Taking place 37 years after a nuclear explosion starts World War III, the story centers on the new city called Neo-Tokyo, which is beset by anti-government terrorism and gang violence. Shotaro Kaneda leads a local biker gang who has to stop his friend Tetsuo Shima from using his newly awakened psionic powers. The fierce Kei is a member of the »

- Hanh Nguyen

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What can fix Britain's 'broken' independent film sector?

2 June 2017 6:28 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Times are tough for UK producers, some of whom are working for virtually nothing.

Who would be an independent UK film producer? One statistic that leapt out of ‘The State Of The UK Independent Film Sector’ study recently completed for UK producers’ association Pact by Olsberg Spi was that 78% of the UK producers contacted for the report have had to defer some or all of their fees since 2007. Given they were unlikely to have had much of a share of the ‘backend’ from the profits of their films, this means that, in certain circumstances, they are working for virtually nothing.

Almost equally gloomy was the report’s observation that the international market value for independent UK films has suffered a decline of an estimated 50% since 2007. The report puts this down to digital disruption, increased competition for audiences and the squeeze caused by the global financial crisis of 2007. It concludes the present financial model is “broken”.

Off the back »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Movie Review – Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017)

1 June 2017 3:49 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, 2017.

Directed by Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberge.

Starring Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Geoffrey Rush, Brenton Thwaites, Kaya Scodelario, Kevin McNally, David Wenham, and Stephen Graham.

Synopsis:

Captain Jack Sparrow searches for the trident of Poseidon while being pursued by an undead sea-captain and his crew.

Starting with the sublime The Curse of the Black Pearl, the Pirates franchise has steadily declined in quality with each offering duller than before and with Depp’s Captain Jack Sparrow becoming more annoying. With its fifth instalment Salazar’s Revenge (Dead Men Tell No Tales in the Us) I was pleasantly surprised as it is an entertaining and enjoyable romp with tons of action and a decent villain.

This time around Jack Sparrow is looking for the trident of Poseidon assisted by Will Turner’s teenage son Henry (Thwaites) and woman of science Carina (Scodelario »

- Helen Murdoch

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Rlj Entertainment Picks Up Us Rights to The Limehouse Golem, Starring Bill Nighy & Olivia Cooke

1 June 2017 3:30 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

If you're already having Bates Motel withdrawals and you're going to miss Olivia Cooke's performance as Emma, Rlj Entertainment might have just the cure for what ails you, as they've just acquired the Us rights to The Limehouse Golem, a new serial killer thriller set in London and starring Cooke alongside Bill Nighy.

Keep an eye out for The Limehouse Golem in theaters and on VOD beginning September 8th, and check out the official press release with full details on the film:

Press Release: Los Angeles, June 1, 2017 – Rlj Entertainment (Nasdaq: Rlje) has acquired U.S. rights to the thriller The Limehouse Golem. Based on the novel “Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem” by Peter Ackroyd, the film was written by the acclaimed writer Jane Goldman (Kingsmen, The Woman in Black), directed by Juan Carlos Medina (Painless) and produced by Stephen Woolley (Their Finest, Interview with a Vampire), Joanna Laurie »

- Derek Anderson

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The Addition Of Cable Will Have A Profound Impact On Deadpool 2 And Beyond, According To X-Men Producer

1 June 2017 9:06 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Cable and Domino are, without question, the two headline-worthy additions to David Leitch’s anti-hero sequel, Deadpool 2, and the former in particular has generated a metric ton of buzz among the comic book community ever since the Merc With a Mouth first teased the advent of Wade Wilson’s long-time nemesis last year.

In typically flippant fashion, Ryan Reynolds’ foul-mouthed protagonist rhymed off a series of big names including Mel Gibson, Dolph Lundgren, and, er, Keira Knightley. But it turns out the Powers That Be have selected Josh Brolin (Avengers: Infinity War) to play the time-travelling mercenary known as Nathan Summers. Brolin beat out a whole host of actors to land the coveted gig, too, after reports claimed that Pierce Brosnan and Stephen Lang were both in contention at one point or another.

Alas, now that Fox and director David Leitch have made their decision, fans can now begin »

- Michael Briers

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Andy Vajna Explains How He’s Bringing Hollywood to Hungary

31 May 2017 9:33 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Andy Vajna, whose credits during his time as a Hollywood producer included movies from the “Rambo” and “Terminator” franchises, is sitting on a yacht in Cannes’ Old Port surveying the horizon, and all looks fair. His focus nowadays — as Hungary’s film commissioner — is on helping international producers navigate a smooth and successful shoot for their movies in his country, and propelling Hungarian films into the global market. He’s making waves on both fronts.

Hungary is the second-biggest production hub in Europe after the U.K., with international producers attracted by the 25% tax rebate, the skilled crews and the modern production facilities. “We were nowhere five years ago,” Vajna says. Six to eight major international movies shoot in Hungary every year, as well as 10 or so films with an above-average budget. Recent productions have included 20th Century Fox spy thriller “Red Sparrow,” starring Jennifer Lawrence, and Lionsgate’s retelling »

- Leo Barraclough

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‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Sails Toward $300 Million Opening Weekend Worldwide

28 May 2017 10:38 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Disney’s latest crack at the “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise appears to be a global hit.

The fifth installment, subtitled “Dead Men Tell No Tales” is sailing to $270.6 million at the international box office. That, combined with the $77 million it’s expected to pull in over the four-day holiday domestically, should easily put the film over $300 million globally during its opening frame.

In China alone the movie will make an estimated $67.8 million. The third highest opening for any Disney movie is partially attributed to the opening coinciding with the country’s Dragon Boat Festival holidays.

The film saw the largest opening of all time in Russia with $18.1 million ($18.6 million including previews). The rest of the top five territories are Korea ($11.6 million); France ($9.3 million); and Germany ($8.4 million).

“Dead Men Tell No Tales” centers on Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow battling deadly ghost sailors, »

- Seth Kelley

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Box Office: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Hooks No. 1, ‘Baywatch’ Belly Flops

28 May 2017 8:35 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” is sailing into first place at the domestic box office this weekend, but the story the numbers dictate is not one of swashbuckling heroics.

Johnny Depp’s fifth outing as Jack Sparrow is looking at a three-day total of $62.2 million from 4,276 locations, and a four-day holiday weekend sum of $77 million. If not for international appeal, that would be a let down for a movie riding on a $230 million production budget.

Related

Film Review: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

The first place finish also can’t cover up a serious case of franchise fatigue. “Dead Men Tell No Tales” is the lowest opening for a Pirates movie apart from the original, which earned over $46 million in its first weekend (and was also the only installation approved by critics). Last time out in 2011, “On Stranger Tides” pulled »

- Seth Kelley

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Pirates of the Caribbean won’t continue without Johnny Depp

28 May 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

While the franchise survived the departure of two of its original stars in Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley with 2011’s Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, producer Jerry Bruckheimer has revealed that the series will only continue for as long as Johnny Depp is willing to return as Captain Jack Sparrow.

““I just don’t see it [working on Pirates without Depp],” Bruckheimer told Digital Spy during a press interview to promote the release of the new film Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales. “The secret to any successful franchise is picking talented people, and Johnny is absolutely key to the success of Pirates. He’s such a unique character, such an endearing character, and such an irreverent character all in one.”

Bruckheimer also seemingly ruled out a small screen spinoff of the blockbuster series, adding that: “You have a kitchen in your house, right? But you still go out to eat. »

- Gary Collinson

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