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‘Cyborg’ is as well an oiled machine as cheap, B-movies get

  • SoundOnSight
Cyborg

Written by Kitty Chalmers and Daniel Hubbard-Smith

Directed by Albert Pyun

U.S.A., 1989

In the future, a dangerous plague wipes out much of humanity, civilization crumbling away with it. Enter the pirates, gangs that reap barbaric pleasure out of rape and pillage. One such faction is led by the Goliath-like figure of Fender (Vincent Klyn), a psychotic individual seeking to intercept a female cyborg, Pearl (Dayle Haddon), traversing the United States to Atlanta and carrying the secret medicinal knowledge that will help the country’s few remaining doctors determine a cure to the deadly virus. Dayle cannot make the journey alone, requiring the help of tracker Gibson (Jean-Claude Van Damme) a man wrestling with his own demons and wanting to settle a score with the nefarious Fender.

Right from the opening minutes it is abundantly clear that the filmmakers wish to ape the general tone and aesthetic
See full article at SoundOnSight »

How a He-Man sequel and a Spider-Man movie became Cyborg

Ryan Lambie Jul 6, 2016

How did an 80s Van Damme action flick emerge from a failed Spider-Man movie and Masters Of The Universe sequel? Ryan takes a look...

Cannon Films was in deep trouble by 1987. Its boom years, between the late 70s to the mid-80s, were largely thanks to an eclectic and hurriedly-made collection of B-movies: Chuck Norris action pictures, Charles Bronson revenge flicks and lots of things with the word ‘ninja’ in the title.

Thanks to its outsider status and anything-for-a-buck approach to filmmaking, Cannon Films became a major name in Hollywood, the grinning faces of its brusque founders - producers Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus - frequently appearing in TV news reports and tinseltown trade papers.

But in the mid-80s, Golan and Globus began to change their strategy. While they would still make Death Wish sequels and Chuck Norris pics, they began to dabble in making more expensive films,
See full article at Den of Geek »

How a He-Man sequel and a Spider-Man movie became Cyborg

  • Den of Geek
How did an 80s Van Damme action flick emerge from a failed Spider-Man movie and Masters Of The Universe sequel? Ryan takes a look...

Cannon Films was in deep trouble by 1987. Its boom years, between the late 70s to the mid-80s, were largely thanks to an eclectic and hurriedly-made collection of B-movies: Chuck Norris action pictures, Charles Bronson revenge flicks and lots of things with the word ‘ninja’ in the title.

Thanks to its outsider status and anything-for-a-buck approach to filmmaking, Cannon Films became a major name in Hollywood, the grinning faces of its brusque founders - producers Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus - frequently appearing in TV news reports and tinseltown trade papers.

But in the mid-80s, Golan and Globus began to change their strategy. While they would still make Death Wish sequels and Chuck Norris pics, they began to dabble in making more expensive films, such
See full article at Den of Geek »

Wasteland and Borrowing from Sci-Fi's Best: A Movie Review

*a screener of this film was provided by the director Kantz.

Director: Kantz.

Writers: Kantz, and Lucas Culshaw.

Admittedly, this reviewer has talked to Kantz on several occasions and his passion for filmmaking often comes through in the topics he likes to talk about. This reviewer loves to talk of film too. That is what makes reviewing Wasteland so much harder. This sci-fi title came out of DVD October 11th and the screener came not much later than that. This is a post-apocalyptic yarn involving revenge as one man, named Keo (Garret Sato), sets out to kill members of the Church, the people who assaulted his wife and kidnapped his only son. This is a pretty straight forward homage to Albert Pyun's 1989 flick Cyborg, with costumes, action and plot line eerily similar. This latest incarnation had a much smaller budget, cast and the audio is almost entirely dubbed to the film's detriment.
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

Comic-Con 2011: The makers of 'Attack the Block' and 'Bellflower' reveal their geekiest guilty pleasures

Comic-Con 2011: The makers of 'Attack the Block' and 'Bellflower' reveal their geekiest guilty pleasures
Among the films represented at this year’s Comic-Con, you won’t find two much more atmospherically different that director Joe Cornish’s Attack the Block and Evan Glodell’s Bellflower. While the British Block is an action-comedy about aliens invading London, Bellflower is an intense, California-set love story in which Glodell plays a guy obsessed with Road Warrior villain Lord Humongous.

However, one thing their respective writer-directors share is a fondness for the, shall we say, “arguable” quality of Cannon Films’ ’80s sci fi output, as we discovered when we asked them to talk about their geekiest guilty pleasure.
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Watch Cyborg (1989) Online For Free: Jean-Claude Van Damme

  • Film-Book
Watch Cyborg Free Online. Albert Pyun‘s Cyborg (1989) stars Jean-Claude Van Damme, Deborah Richter, Vincent Klyn, Dayle Haddon, and Terrie Batson. Cyborg (1989)’s plot synopsis: a martial-arts science fiction film where Gibson Rickenbacker (Jean-Claude Van Damme), a gun for hire (Slingers), battles a group of murderous marauders (The Pirates) led by Fender Tremolo (Vincent Klyn) along the East coast of the United States in a post-apocalyptic future to rescue and protect a cyborg that holds the key to the salvation of humanity. “I like this World!!!!!!”

My favorite part of Cyborg is probably the sewer/chase/fight sequence. Great action. Cyborg didn’t do very well in theaters though.”The movie received a generally negative reception from critics however it did retained a cult status…Cyborg 2, starring Elias Koteas and Angelina Jolie, was released in 1993. Cyborg 3: The Recycler, a direct-to-video release, followed in 1995. Both films bear little to
See full article at Film-Book »

Cyborg Remake in the Works

AICN has learned that "Cyborg" director Albert Pyun is planning to remake his own 1989 movie, which starred Jean-Claude Van Damme as a mercenary tracking a cyborg through a post-apocalyptic America. Pyun told the site that he's currently in an "acquisition process" with MGM, but already has the financial backing of the same company that funded "Donnie Darko," "Memento" and "Monster." A script has yet to be finished, but Pyun promises that there will be more "car/vehicle mayhem" with more emphasis on practical effects rather than CGI. At this point, Vince Klyn and Terrie Batson, who played the villain and the love interest in the original 1989 film, are already onboard for the remake. The helmer is hoping to also work out deals with Rutger Hauer and Michael Dudikoff.
See full article at Worst Previews »

Cyborg (1988): Director’s Cut: Jean-Claude Van Damme, Albert Pyun Release

  • Film-Book
The Director’s Cut of Albert Pyun‘s Cyborg (1988) starring Jean-Claude Van Damme has been released. “Albert Pyun’s longtime composer found the director’s last cut of Cyborg before he left the picture after disputes with Cannon, Jean Claude Van Damme and producer Sheldon Lettichand.” Also starring Deborah Richter, Vincent Klyn, Dayle Haddon, Ralf Möller, and Alex Daniels, we’ve learned the new version of the film is the cut before it had to be trimmed to get an R rating. I bet one of extended scenes is the decapitation scene at the beginning of the film and the surgery scene on Pearl (Dayle Haddon).

The copy found is a telecine of the actual workprint in widescreen dated October 8, 1988. It’s only got a temp mix stereo track, but includes the original, never heard rock score by Tony Riparetti and Jim Saad which was eventually replaced by Kevin Bassinson’s score.
See full article at Film-Book »

See the Ending Fight Scene from the New Cyborg Director's Cut

And more goods came in today from Albert Pyun for the new director's cut of his 1989 film Cyborg, and he promises it is "very violent". Just how we like it, right?

Found recently by composer Tony Riparetti after being lost for 22 years, this is a slightly restored cut of Cyborg created from two VHS copies of a telecine of the original 35 mm work print. What Pyun provided today is the ending fight scene between Van Damme's Gibson Rickenbacker and Vincent Klyn as the main villain Fender Tremelo, which is completely different than the released version.

Synopsis:

Gibson Rickenbacker is a hired fighter living in an apocalyptic America where a plague has infected most of the United States and the rest of the world. In New York City Gibson encounters a woman named Pearl Prophet (Dayle Haddon). Pearl reveals to Gibson that she is a cyborg who is carrying vital
See full article at Dread Central »

What's Your Favorite Serious Slo-Mo Walk?

  • Cinematical
What's Your Favorite Serious Slo-Mo Walk?
As I confessed in Jenni's "Date Movie Disasters" post earlier this month, I have a thing for Cyborg. It's one of my favorite cheesy action films, and my late '90s date movie of choice. But I've long since neglected it -- the old, battered vhs was pushed into a closet somewhere as the disc world took over, and it wasn't until this month that I finally picked it up on DVD. Time, and I must say -- better film taste, haven't tarnished my love, and in fact, have re-sparked my appreciation not only for classic Van Damme, but the killer, serious, slow-motion walk.

Where the slow clap has become a terrible moment of cinema better left in the past, there's still magic in the serious, slo-mo walk. In Cyborg, when that apocalyptic '80s music plays and Fender walks forward with his shiny, metal duds, freakishly blue eyes, and a huge posse of dirty,
See full article at Cinematical »

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