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Disney Classics Getting Blu-Ray Release August 12th – Tarzan, Hercules, And More

A slew of classic Disney movies are hitting for the first time on Blu-Ray, including one double-pack release, and you’re going to want to make sure to pick these up. You haven’t paid attention to some of these titles for a while, and it’s about time you got the chance to catch them on Blu-Ray. The best part is that there’s a great mix of releases hitting. Bedknobs and Broomsticks is all but lost in the cultural consciousness, and it deserves a return. The Academy Award-winning movie from the year I was born is filled with a lot of fun and adventure, and like most Disney films, holds up well for a whole new generation.

The rest of the group covers a great spectrum, including two animated “big” titles, and a 10th Anniversary release. There’s a lot to expose your family to here, so check out all the info below,
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Review: Popeye the Sailor the 1960s Classics Vol. 1

  • Comicmix
January 1929 was a very good month for comic strip readers. On the 7th they got to see the arrival of Tarzan and Buck Rogers while ten days later, fans of Thimble Theater met a brand new character named Popeye. The sailor was never intended to take over the strip but his popularity with readers encouraged E.C. Segar to keep him around until he finally shoved the Oyl family from the spotlight.

Burnishing his reputation were the brilliantly execute black and white theatrical shorts produced by Max and Dave Fleischer. After they shuttered operations, others took over the cartoon production, keeping Popeye a mainstay for generations of fans. Many of my generation were treated to the somewhat inferior Associated Artists Productions cartoons which completed their run in 1957. Not to be undone, King Features Syndicate hired Al Brodax to oversee a new round of cartoons aimed for the burgeoning television syndication market.
See full article at Comicmix »

Disney 53, Week 11: The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more re-editions than a Spielberg movie, and that’s saying something. This week we say goodbye to the package movies with Two Fabulous Characters, Ichabod And Mister Toad.

Directed by Jack Kinney,Clyde Geronimi and James Algar

1949/ 68 Minutes

The last of Disney’s “package films”, Ichabod And Mister Toad basically uses up the last little odds and ends Disney had lying around during the World War Two.

The idea of adapting Kenneth Grahame’s 1908 book The Wind In The Willows actually began in 1938, shortly after the release of Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs. Disney wasn’t sure
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney 53, Week 10: Melody Time

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more re-editions than a Spielberg movie, and that’s saying something. This week it’s Melody Time.

Directed by Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, Clyde Geronimi and Wilfred Jackson

1948/ 75 Minutes

Aaand we’re back to the grab bag again. This was the last “package film” Disney made – cheap and cheerful shorts made up of whatever scraps were left in the barrel. Disney made no restrictions on their artists, and it shows.

Synopsis: After a schmaltzy title song and cards introducing the players, an animated paintbrush “paints” a quite disturbing pair of lips, before painting the rest of the host,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney 53, Week 9: Fun and Fancy Free

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more re-editions than a Spielberg movie, and that’s saying something.

This week it’s Fun And Fancy Free

Directed by Jack Kinney, Bill Roberts, Hamilton Luske and William Morgan.

1947/ 73 Minutes

After the grab-bag nature of Make Mine Music, Fun And Fancy Free feels a much tighter return to form for the Disney studios. Both shorts, Bongo and Mickey and the Beanstalk were started on almost a decade earlier.

Bongo, based on a short story by Sinclair Lewis of Cosmopolitan magazine in 1930, was originally suggested to be a prequel to Dumbo, setting it in the same circus and
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney 54 – Week 8: Make Mine Music

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more re-editions than a Spielberg movie, and that’s saying something.

And now for something slightly different. Make Mine Music.

Directed by Jack Kinney, Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Joshua Meador, Robert Cormack.

1945/ 76 Minutes*

During the Second World War, the Disney Studios were effectively carved up. A lot of the staff were drafted into the Army, and the ones left were called on to make training and propaganda films for the government. Shorts like The New Spirit (1942), Der Fuehrer’S Face (1943) Education For Death and Commando Duck (1944), and the “unofficial” Disney movie, Victory Through Air Power, many of which
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney 53, Week 6: Saludos Amigos

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more editions than the Star Wars trilogy, and that’s saying something.

This week it’s time to head south of the border. Saludos Amigos!

1953/ 42 Minutes

Directed by Norman Ferguson, Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, Bill Roberts

In early 1941, before the United States joined World War II, the Us Department of State commissioned a Disney goodwill tour of South America. This was intended to lead to a movie being shown in the Us, Central, and South America as part of the ‘Good Neighbor Policy’, set up by President Franklin Roosevelt, in an attempt to improve relations between the States and Latin America.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Blu-Ray Releases: Feb. 3 – Feb. 9

Welcome to another weekly preview of upcoming Blu-Ray releases! In this week’s edition, Flight makes a good case for taking the train to your next vacation destination, Here Comes the Boom hits store shelves with a – well with a boom I guess, and a beloved family classic finally gets a Blu-Ray release.

Ready for this week’s Blu-Ray releases? Then read on.

Flight

Starring: Denzel Washington, John Goodman, Don Cheadle, Kelly Reilly, Bruce Greenwood, and Melissa Leo.

Director: Robert Zemeckis

An American drama film from Academy Award-winning director Robert Zemeckis. It was well received by critics and was nominated for two Academy Awards: Best Actor (for the film’s star Denzel Washington) and Best Original Screenplay.

Plot: An airline pilot saves a flight from crashing, but an investigation into the malfunction reveals something troubling.

My Thoughts: I haven’t watched it yet, but I’m looking forward to it.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Extended Thoughts on ‘Saludos Amigos’

Saludos Amigos

Directed by Norman Ferguson, Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, William Roberts

Written by Homer Brightman, Bill Cottrell, Dick Huemer, Joe Grant, Harold Reeves, Ted Sears, Webb Smith, Roy Williams, Ralph Wright

Considering Saludos Amigos in comparison with its follow-up, The Three Caballeros, is akin to analyzing the pregame to the Super Bowl. (Our guest, Jeff Heimbuch, may disagree but will surely appreciate comparing these two movies to such a titanic worldwide event.) I’m often very vocal about not enjoying Disney’s release strategy for some of their lesser animated films—or, if you like, films they consider to be lesser even if the fans of those films are legion—specifically how they combine films in a Blu-ray combo pack. If you like Pocahontas and want it on Blu-ray, great! You’re cool if the film is packaged with its direct-to-dvd sequel, yeah? Well, you don’t have a choice,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Disney 53, Week 2: Pinocchio

Each week, Thn takes a look back at one of the Walt Disney Animated Classics. The ones that the Walt Disney Company showed in cinemas, the ones they’re most proud of, the ones that still cost a bloody fortune no matter how old they are. The really good ones get through more editions than the Star Wars trilogy, and that’s saying something.

This week we take a look back at everyone’s favourite wooden-head. No, not Robert Pattinson, but Pinocchio.

1940/ 88 minutes

Budget: $ 2.6 million

Box Office: $ 1.4 – 1.9 million [Initial release, see below]

Directed by Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske, Norman Ferguson, T. Hee,

Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney and Bill Roberts.

Having silenced his critics and made a killing, of sorts, with Snow White, Disney’s next project’s initial release was hampered somewhat by a little political scuffle known as World War Two, meaning foreign markets suffered. The war would have repercussions further down the
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The Point Radio: Fringe Winds Down Warehouse 13 Winds Up

  • Comicmix
Tonight Fringe starts it’s run of the final 13 episodes on Fox (8pm Et) and we talk to Joshua Jackson and Anna Torv on how they are dealing with it all. Meanwhile, Monday on SyFy (9pm Et), Warehouse 13 serves up it’s midseason finale and it’s huge. Show runner Jack Kinney along with Allison Scagliotti and Saul Rubinek gives us hints in what we can expect. Plus welcome Robyn Schneider (@robynschneider), joining the broadcast today and talking Doctor Wh0 exclusively here!

Don’t miss a minute of pop culture news – The Point Radio - 24 hours a day of pop culture fun for Free. Go Here and Listen Free on any computer or on any mobile device with the Tune In Radio app - and follow us on Twitter @ThePointRadio.

Originally published on ComicMix as The Point Radio: Fringe Winds Down Warehouse 13 Winds Up
See full article at Comicmix »

Extended Thoughts on ‘Victory Through Air Power’

Victory Through Air Power

Directed by Perce Pearce, James Algar, Clyde Geronimi, Jack Kinney, H.C. Potter

Written by Perce Pearce, T. Hee, Erdman Penner, William Cottrell, James Brodero, George Stallings, Jose Rodriguez

Starring Alexander P. de Seversky, Art Baker

Watching Victory Through Air Power in 2012 is akin to being given a glimpse into a parallel universe. Because of how protective the Walt Disney Company is of its history and legacy, and what people know of that history and legacy, the period in which they worked almost solely at creating propaganda of various types for the United States government isn’t as frequently discussed as their work on films like Bambi, Dumbo, or the package films of the 1940s. The very idea of propaganda is so different now than it was 70 years ago that being confronted by a more direct, adult, and dry version of patriotism is startling. Watching any film
See full article at SoundOnSight »

[DVD Review] Walt Disney Animation Collection: Volume 5: The Wind in the Willows

There’s a mixed bag waiting for Disney fans with Volume 5 of the Disney Classic Short Films collection. On one hand you have the unforgettable The Wind in the Willows with the awesome J. Thaddeus Toad and a genuinely touching version of The Ugly Duckling. But then you have four more cartoons all on the older spectrum making it hard to say whether or not the younger ones in your life will be able to sit still. This volume has the highest concentration of older cartoons as well as a newer cartoon that most kids won’t really latch onto – so I don’t think it’s too much of a stretch to say that older children will get more out of this volume than the youngest ones.

The Wind in the Willows (1949)

Directed by James Algar & Jack Kinney, Written by Winston Hibler & Kenneth Grahame

God, what can really be said about this incredible classic.
See full article at JustPressPlay »

See also

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