Chris Thomas King - News Poster

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Wild Britain With Ray Mears | Spooks | A History of Horror With Mark Gatiss | Whitechapel | Tonight's TV highlights

  • The Guardian - TV News
Wild Britain With Ray Mears | Spooks | A History of Horror With Mark Gatiss | Whitechapel

Wild Britain With Ray Mears

8pm, ITV1

The survival expert heads off to various British nature spots to scrabble around in search of history and wildlife, and in this opening episode he's in the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. Originally protected as a royal hunting reserve in the 11th century, the Forest once ran amuck with wild boar. Then, 300 years ago, the last one died. Now they have been reintroduced. Mears spots a handful of them, with their piglets, on a foraging trip for the ingredients for a wild salad – but stops short of adding boar to his dinner.

Spooks

9pm, BBC1

After last week's disappointing episode, Spooks gets back on track with the tale of what happens when a Chinese snatch team arrives in London. Naturally, it's all rather complicated, principally because Section D haven't
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Kill Switch Movie Poster Featuring Steven Seagal

  • ShockYa
First Look International recently released a brand new movie poster from the upcoming Steven Seagal action film “Kill Switch” aka A Higher Form of Learning by director Jeff King (Ruslan) and starring Steven Seagal (Pistol Whipped, The Onion Movie), Holly Dignard (Pole Reversal, Eureka), Chris Thomas King, Michael Filipowich and the late Isaac Hayes (South Park, Return to Sleepaway Camp). Synopsis: Written by action star Steven Seagal, “Kill Switch” follows a troubled detective travels to Memphis in order to track down a pair of serial killers. Stay tuned to Toxic Shock TV for the latest “Kill Switch” movie news and movie posters.
See full article at ShockYa »

Down From the Mountain

First, there was the film, "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" And the film begot a soundtrack. And the soundtrack begot a concert. And the concert begot another film. And that film begot another soundtrack. And so on.

You can't accuse the Coen brothers of neglecting the synergy involved in their use of classic American bluegrass and country music in their recent film. Featuring such performers as bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, The Fairfield Four, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, Chris Thomas King, Norman Blake and the late John Hartford, the soundtrack has become one of the biggest surprise hits of the year. This film -- by the documentary team of Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, and D.A. Pennebaker, and executive produced by T-Bone Burnett (the album producer) and the Coen brothers -- documents a concert at Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium in May 2000 featuring music from "O Brother". It is playing an exclusive theatrical engagement at New York's Screening Room.

Mixing onstage performances by the various artists with backstage interviews in which they discuss their music and their involvement with "O Brother", "Down From the Mountain", while it offers many stirring musical performances, doesn't stand out either as a concert film or an enlightening documentary. The musical segments are filmed in lackluster style, with little of the flair or excitement of the better concert films ("The Last Waltz", etc.). The backstage sequences are not particularly enlightening, and the interviews lack depth.

Still, the film is valuable if only for its recording of a group of great and sadly unappreciated American musicians who have toiled far too long in relative obscurity. Watching Stanley perform a stark, a cappella version of the mournful "O Death", Hartford comically warble through "Big Rock Candy Mountain" or the Cox Family raising chills with their rendition of "I Am Weary", one is vividly reminded of the utter triviality of most modern-day popular music.

DOWN FROM THE MOUNTAIN

Cowboy Booking International

Directors:Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, D.A. Pennebaker

Executive producers:T-Bone Burnett, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Producers:Bob Neuwirth, Frazer Pennebaker

Cinematographers:Joan Churchill, Jim Desmond, Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, Bob Neuwirth, Jehane Noujaim, D.A. Pennebaker, John Paul Pennebaker

Editors:Nick Doob, D.A. Pennebaker

Color/stereo

Running time -- 98 minutes

No MPAA rating

Down From the Mountain

First, there was the film, "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" And the film begot a soundtrack. And the soundtrack begot a concert. And the concert begot another film. And that film begot another soundtrack. And so on.

You can't accuse the Coen brothers of neglecting the synergy involved in their use of classic American bluegrass and country music in their recent film. Featuring such performers as bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, The Fairfield Four, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, Chris Thomas King, Norman Blake and the late John Hartford, the soundtrack has become one of the biggest surprise hits of the year. This film -- by the documentary team of Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, and D.A. Pennebaker, and executive produced by T-Bone Burnett (the album producer) and the Coen brothers -- documents a concert at Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium in May 2000 featuring music from "O Brother". It is playing an exclusive theatrical engagement at New York's Screening Room.

Mixing onstage performances by the various artists with backstage interviews in which they discuss their music and their involvement with "O Brother", "Down From the Mountain", while it offers many stirring musical performances, doesn't stand out either as a concert film or an enlightening documentary. The musical segments are filmed in lackluster style, with little of the flair or excitement of the better concert films ("The Last Waltz", etc.). The backstage sequences are not particularly enlightening, and the interviews lack depth.

Still, the film is valuable if only for its recording of a group of great and sadly unappreciated American musicians who have toiled far too long in relative obscurity. Watching Stanley perform a stark, a cappella version of the mournful "O Death", Hartford comically warble through "Big Rock Candy Mountain" or the Cox Family raising chills with their rendition of "I Am Weary", one is vividly reminded of the utter triviality of most modern-day popular music.

DOWN FROM THE MOUNTAIN

Cowboy Booking International

Directors:Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, D.A. Pennebaker

Executive producers:T-Bone Burnett, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Producers:Bob Neuwirth, Frazer Pennebaker

Cinematographers:Joan Churchill, Jim Desmond, Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, Bob Neuwirth, Jehane Noujaim, D.A. Pennebaker, John Paul Pennebaker

Editors:Nick Doob, D.A. Pennebaker

Color/stereo

Running time -- 98 minutes

No MPAA rating

Down From the Mountain

First, there was the film, "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" And the film begot a soundtrack. And the soundtrack begot a concert. And the concert begot another film. And that film begot another soundtrack. And so on.

You can't accuse the Coen brothers of neglecting the synergy involved in their use of classic American bluegrass and country music in their recent film. Featuring such performers as bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, The Fairfield Four, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, Chris Thomas King, Norman Blake and the late John Hartford, the soundtrack has become one of the biggest surprise hits of the year. This film -- by the documentary team of Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, and D.A. Pennebaker, and executive produced by T-Bone Burnett (the album producer) and the Coen brothers -- documents a concert at Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium in May 2000 featuring music from "O Brother". It is playing an exclusive theatrical engagement at New York's Screening Room.

Mixing onstage performances by the various artists with backstage interviews in which they discuss their music and their involvement with "O Brother", "Down From the Mountain", while it offers many stirring musical performances, doesn't stand out either as a concert film or an enlightening documentary. The musical segments are filmed in lackluster style, with little of the flair or excitement of the better concert films ("The Last Waltz", etc.). The backstage sequences are not particularly enlightening, and the interviews lack depth.

Still, the film is valuable if only for its recording of a group of great and sadly unappreciated American musicians who have toiled far too long in relative obscurity. Watching Stanley perform a stark, a cappella version of the mournful "O Death", Hartford comically warble through "Big Rock Candy Mountain" or the Cox Family raising chills with their rendition of "I Am Weary", one is vividly reminded of the utter triviality of most modern-day popular music.

DOWN FROM THE MOUNTAIN

Cowboy Booking International

Directors:Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, D.A. Pennebaker

Executive producers:T-Bone Burnett, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Producers:Bob Neuwirth, Frazer Pennebaker

Cinematographers:Joan Churchill, Jim Desmond, Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, Bob Neuwirth, Jehane Noujaim, D.A. Pennebaker, John Paul Pennebaker

Editors:Nick Doob, D.A. Pennebaker

Color/stereo

Running time -- 98 minutes

No MPAA rating

Down From the Mountain

First, there was the film, "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" And the film begot a soundtrack. And the soundtrack begot a concert. And the concert begot another film. And that film begot another soundtrack. And so on.

You can't accuse the Coen brothers of neglecting the synergy involved in their use of classic American bluegrass and country music in their recent film. Featuring such performers as bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, The Fairfield Four, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, Chris Thomas King, Norman Blake and the late John Hartford, the soundtrack has become one of the biggest surprise hits of the year. This film -- by the documentary team of Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, and D.A. Pennebaker, and executive produced by T-Bone Burnett (the album producer) and the Coen brothers -- documents a concert at Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium in May 2000 featuring music from "O Brother". It is playing an exclusive theatrical engagement at New York's Screening Room.

Mixing onstage performances by the various artists with backstage interviews in which they discuss their music and their involvement with "O Brother", "Down From the Mountain", while it offers many stirring musical performances, doesn't stand out either as a concert film or an enlightening documentary. The musical segments are filmed in lackluster style, with little of the flair or excitement of the better concert films ("The Last Waltz", etc.). The backstage sequences are not particularly enlightening, and the interviews lack depth.

Still, the film is valuable if only for its recording of a group of great and sadly unappreciated American musicians who have toiled far too long in relative obscurity. Watching Stanley perform a stark, a cappella version of the mournful "O Death", Hartford comically warble through "Big Rock Candy Mountain" or the Cox Family raising chills with their rendition of "I Am Weary", one is vividly reminded of the utter triviality of most modern-day popular music.

DOWN FROM THE MOUNTAIN

Cowboy Booking International

Directors:Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, D.A. Pennebaker

Executive producers:T-Bone Burnett, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Producers:Bob Neuwirth, Frazer Pennebaker

Cinematographers:Joan Churchill, Jim Desmond, Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, Bob Neuwirth, Jehane Noujaim, D.A. Pennebaker, John Paul Pennebaker

Editors:Nick Doob, D.A. Pennebaker

Color/stereo

Running time -- 98 minutes

No MPAA rating

See also

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