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Norman Lear Looks Back on Early Days as TV Comedy Writer

Norman Lear Looks Back on Early Days as TV Comedy Writer
If anyone deserves to write a memoir, it’s Norman Lear, who reinvented television comedy in the 1970s with “All in the Family,” and whose “Even This I Get to Experience,” a how-to book about understanding the TV business, comes out in paperback Oct. 27. Lear was first mentioned in Variety on Nov. 15, 1950, as part of a story about an exodus of L.A. writers moving to New York for TV jobs.

How did you get the New York gig?

Ed Simmons and I had written a routine for Danny Thomas’ nightclub act, which led to New York and Jack Haley’s “Ford Star Review.” Jerry Lewis saw a sketch that he knew he could do better, so he wanted us. McA handled both shows, so it was easy to move over to Martin & Lewis. Within three weeks, we were writing for “The Colgate Comedy Hour.” Suddenly Simmons & Lear were major comedy writers.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

One of Earliest Surviving Academy Award Nominees in Acting Categories Dead at 88

Joan Lorring, 1945 Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee, dead at 88: One of the earliest surviving Academy Award nominees in the acting categories, Lorring was best known for holding her own against Bette Davis in ‘The Corn Is Green’ (photo: Joan Lorring in ‘Three Strangers’) Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee Joan Lorring, who stole the 1945 film version of The Corn Is Green from none other than Warner Bros. reigning queen Bette Davis, died Friday, May 30, 2014, in the New York City suburb of Sleepy Hollow. So far, online obits haven’t mentioned the cause of death. Lorring, one of the earliest surviving Oscar nominees in the acting categories, was 88. Directed by Irving Rapper, who had also handled one of Bette Davis’ biggest hits, the 1942 sudsy soap opera Now, Voyager, Warners’ The Corn Is Green was a decent if uninspired film version of Emlyn Williams’ semi-autobiographical 1938 hit play about an English schoolteacher,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Universal Turning 1970s Series ‘It Takes a Thief’ into Film (Exclusive)

Universal Turning 1970s Series ‘It Takes a Thief’ into Film (Exclusive)
Universal is looking to get the gears moving on a feature adaptation of “It Takes a Thief,” bringing on Greg Russo to pen the script.

Inspired by the 1970s TV show created by Roland Kibbee and starring Robert Wagner, the story follows a young CIA analyst who recruits a brilliant thief, who has managed to evade the CIA to work for him. An earlier draft was written by Joe Gazzam.

John Davis is producing through his Davis Entertainment banner as is Joseph Singer. Derek Dauchy will oversee for Davis, with Scott Bernstein overseeing it for Universal.

Russo has been on a hot streak of late, and “It Takes a Thief” would be the latest in a recent string of projects to bolster his resume. He recently penned the script “Heatseekers” for Paramount, which Michael Bay and Chris Morgan are producing, and has also sold a handful of specs and pitches,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Supporting Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated (part 5 of 5)

Gary Oldman as Jackie Flannery in State Of Grace (Phil Joanou, 1990, USA):

Long considered one of the most talented actors in cinema, it’s very strange that his outstanding acting as the younger brother of Ed Harris’ local crime boss in this underrated film doesn’t get talked about nearly enough when discussing Oldman’s body of work. This is a must-see performance for all Oldman fans. For the record, State Of Grace is a far better Irish mob film than The Departed (Martin Scorsese, 2006, USA), primarily because it contains much better acting across the board. Oldman was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar for Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (Tomas Alfredson, 2011, UK/France).

Other notable Gary Oldman performances: Prick Up Your Ears (Stephen Frears, 1987, USA), Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992, USA), True Romance (Tony Scott, 1993, USA), Leon: The Professional (Luc Besson, 1994, France), Air Force One (Wolfgang Petersen, 1997, USA), The Contender (Rod Lurie,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Futurist Space Of 'Blade Runner'

The Futurist Space Of 'Blade Runner'
By Daniel Portilla

Click here for the original article.

Following with the films we will recommend every week, this time we want to introduce “Blade Runner”. Another classic from the ’80 that shows a future Los Angeles with an atmosphere that intents to shape the urban space within which we will move in the current century. The soundtrack, composed by Vangelis deserves to be mentioned as it plays a fundamental role in the comprehension of this futuristic American city.

More info after the break.

Main Info

Original Title: Blade Runner

Year: 1982

Runtime: 117 min.

Country: United States

Director: Ridley Scott

Writer: Hampton Fancher, David Peoples y Roland Kibbee

Soundtrack: Vangelis

Photography Director: Jordan Cronenweth

Cast: Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, Daryl Hannah

Plot

In Los Angeles 2019, humans have genetically engineered Replicants, which are essentially humans who are designed for labor and entertainment purposes. They are illegal on earth,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Old Ass Movies: The Marx Brothers Spend ‘A Night in Casablanca’

Your weekly fix of great movies made before you were born that you should check out before you die. This week’s Old Ass Movies celebrates the nonsense of the best American comedians of all time. Groucho, Harpo and Chico move in on Bogart’s territory by setting up camp at a hotel in Casablanca, mocking Nazis, playing with a toupee, and remembering to set their watches. A Night in Casablanca (1946) Directed By: Archie Mayo Written By: Joseph Fields & Roland Kibbee Starring: Groucho Marx, Chico Marx, Harpo Marx, Sig Ruman, Lisette Verea, Lois Collier, and Charles Drake Selling someone on watching a Marx Brothers movie should be as easy as standing on the street corner offering free bacon, but A Night in Casablanca isn’t the typical Marx movie. It certainly shouldn’t be the first a newcomer should see, since that distinction goes to Duck Soup. It shouldn’t even be the second or third film
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

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