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Callie Khouri Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (2) | Trivia (4) | Personal Quotes (3)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 27 November 1957San Antonio, Texas, USA
Birth NameCarolyn Ann Khouri

Mini Bio (1)

Raised in Texas and Kentucky by her doctor father and mother. Went to Purdue University to study landscape architecture but switched to drama. Moved to Nashville after college to be with her family before heading to Los Angeles in 1982 to study at the Strasburg Institute. Worked for a commercials production company as a receptionist before taking a position with them as a music video production assistant. While working at the office, she began work on what would eventually become Thelma & Louise (1991), writing the script in longhand at home and then retyping it on the job.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Tony Adam <anthony-adam@tamu.edu>

Spouse (2)

T Bone Burnett (2006 - present)
David W. Warfield (May 1990 - ?) (divorced)

Trivia (4)

Briefly attended Purdue University as a theater major, but dropped out after five semesters.
Worked as a theater apprentice, waitress, and as a secretary at a music video production company before getting into the film business.
Along with Kenneth Branagh, was one of the directors considered for Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).
Was member of the dramatic jury at the Sundance Film Festival in 1992.

Personal Quotes (3)

[1992: Accepting her Oscar for Best Original Screenplay] "Well, for everybody that wanted to see a happy ending for Thelma & Louise (1991), to me, this is it."
[responding to being called a 'toxic feminist' for writing "Thelma & Louise"] Kiss my ass, kiss my ass. I was raised in this society. Let them get their deal worked out about the way women are treated in films before they start hassling me about the way men are treated. There's a whole genre of films known as 'exploitation' based on the degradation of women and as a whole bunch of redneck critics extolling its virtues, and until there's a subgenre of women doing the same thing to men in numbers too numerous to court, as is the case with exploitation film, then just shut the fuck up.
[on the ending of "Thelma & Louise"] It always struck me as preposterous that people saw it as a suicide. I don't even think of them as dead. I just wasn't in any way prepared for people to say, 'God, they killed themselves? What kind of message is that?' I want to say, 'It's the message you came up with, not me.' To me, the ending was symbolic, not literal. I mean, come on, read a book. We did everything possible to make sure you didn't see a literal death. That you didn't see the car land, you didn't see a big puff of smoke come up out of the canyon. You were left with the image of them flying. They flew away, out of this world and into the mass unconscious. Women who are completely free from all the shackles that restrain them have no place in this world. The world is not big enough to support them. They will be brought down if they stay here. They weren't going to be brought down. So let them go. I loved that ending and I loved the imagery. After all they went through I didn't want anybody to be able to touch them.

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