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Lon Chaney The Phantom Of The Opera October 6th at Schlafly Bottleworks

“His eyes are ghastly beads in which there is no light – like holes in a grinning skull! His face is like leprous parchment, yellow skin strung tight over protruding bones! His nose – there is no nose!”

The Phantom Of The Opera (1925) starring Lon Chaney screens Thursday October 6th at 7:00pm at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Avenue Maplewood, Mo 63143).

The Phantom Of The Opera is not only a classic of the silent screen, it is one of the all-time greatest movies ever made. The great Lon Chaney, at the peak of his career, plays the title character, in perhaps the role for which he is best remembered. Mary Philbin plays the heroine, Christine, an opera singer for whom the Phantom has taken a personal interest, and Norman Kerry as Raoul, Christine’s love interest and hero of the piece.

The now famous story centers around the Phantom’s interest in Christine,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Listen to the Score for The Unknown (1927) by The Rats And People Motion Picture Orchestra

The Tod Browning Tribute at The St. Louis International Film Festival was an epic evening of vintage silent cinema and live music. (Details about the event can be found Here) http://www.wearemoviegeeks.com/2015/11/sliff-2015-tribute-to-tod-browning-this-friday-the-unknown-and-freaks/

The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra accompanied director Tod Browning’s 1927 silent film The Unknown which starred Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford. The St. Louis-based musicians did a terrific job with their original score and if you missed the event, we have good news. The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra have posted the performance online. If you go Here https://soundcloud.com/rats-1/the-unknown , you will find the recording of the score. Get out your The Unknown DVD (available on the TCM Archives – The Lon Chaney Collection) or, if you don’t have the DVD, you can find the complete film online Here http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2aq5g1_the-unknown-
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2015: Tribute to Tod Browning This Friday – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7:30pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman. Ticket information can be found Here

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Day of the Dead List: Top 10 Most Piercingly Horrific Movie Screams

Top Ten Scream Queens: Barbara Steele, who both emitted screams and made others do same, is in a category of her own. Top Ten Scream Queens Halloween is over until next year, but the equally bewitching Day of the Dead is just around the corner. So, dead or alive, here's my revised and expanded list of cinema's Top Ten Scream Queens. This highly personal compilation is based on how memorable – as opposed to how loud or how frequent – were the screams. That's the key reason you won't find listed below actresses featured in gory slasher films. After all, the screams – and just about everything else in such movies – are as meaningless as their plots. You also won't find any screaming guys (i.e., Scream Kings) on the list below even though I've got absolutely nothing against guys who scream in horror, whether in movies or in life. There are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tribute To Tod Browning at Sliff November 13th – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though best known as the director of the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘The Phantom of the Opera’ (1925) is a stunning example of early Hollywood at its most lavish

The Phantom of the Opera

Written by Elliot J. Clawson, Raymond L. Schrock and Bernard McConville

Directed by Rupert Julian (uncredited: Edward Sedgwick)

U.S.A., 1925

The following review is based on the silent version from 1925, not the 1930 version that included some dialogue. The version viewed for the purposes the present review also featured colour-tinted scenes and the infamous opening scene in which a man with a lamp walks through a dark tunnel, which is reportedly footage shot later for the 1930 sound version, but has somehow made it into all existing cuts of the original 1925 film.

The 1920s represent a defining decade for film, both in the United States and worldwide. Many of the earliest great pictures we produced during this time, with several film auteurs getting their start, such as Alfred Hitchcock, Jean Renoir and F. W. Murnau but to name a few. For Hollywood, which was growing in
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Phantom of the Opera

The latest release of Lon Chaney's most famous silent classic is a Blu-ray, which allows us to marvel at at the actor's artistry in a beautifully tinted HD image. Erik the Phantom is one of the two or three greatest fantasy makeup performances of all time. The release has three separate encodings, of different versions running at different film speeds. A 1929 recut has the best image, while the original 1925 version is uncut. The Phantom of the Opera Blu-ray Kino Classics / Blackhawk 1925/29 / B&W with tints and Technicolor sequences / 1:37 flat Silent Aperture / 78, 92 and 114 min. / Street Date October 13, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Lon Chaney, Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry, Arthur Edmund Carewe, Gibson Gowland, John St. Polis, Snitz Edwards. Cinematography Milton Bridenbecker, Virgil Miller, Charles Van Enger Consulting Artist Ben Carré Film Editors Maurice Pivar, Gilmore Walker Original Music Makeup Lon Chaney Written by Elliott J. Clawson from the novel
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar Winner Hoffman, Child Star Temple Honored with Library of Congress Screenings

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Shirley Temple, and Oscar movies: Library of Congress’ March 2014 screenings (photo: Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote in ‘Capote’) Tributes to the recently deceased Shirley Temple and Philip Seymour Hoffman, and several Academy Award-nominated and -winning films are among the March 2014 screenings at the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater and, in collaboration with the Library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, The State Theatre, both located in Culpeper, Virginia. The 1934 sentimental comedy-drama Little Miss Marker (March 6, Packard) is the movie that turned six-year-old Shirley Temple into a major film star. Temple would become the biggest domestic box-office draw of the mid-1930s, and, Tyrone Power, Alice Faye, Sonja Henie, Don Ameche, Loretta Young, and Madeleine Carroll notwithstanding, would remain 20th Century Fox’s top star until later in the decade. Directed by Alexander Hall (Here Comes Mr. Jordan, My Sister Eileen), Little Miss Marker — actually, a Paramount
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Frederica Sagor Pt.3: The Way Of All Flesh Plagiarism

Frederica Sagor Pt.2: Women Screenwriters in 1920s Hollywood [Photo: Emil Jannings in The Way of All Flesh.] Frederica Sagor's reported final Hollywood screen credit was the scenario for the 1928 slapstick comedy The Farmer's Daughter, directed by Arthur Rosson at Fox. Marjorie Beebe, previously featured in several comedy shorts, had the title role (no relation to Loretta Young's 1947 Oscar-winning Congresswoman-to-be). In her book, Sagor says she was paid $750 a week (approx. $9,700 today) to write the story for this programmer — one she hated — about rural lovers and piles of manure. The previous year, Sagor had married screenwriter Ernest Maas, who held an executive post at Fox. In her autobiography, she states that the couple wrote a story named Beefsteak Joe, inspired by the life of Maas' father, that was misappropriated by Paramount and released as The Way of All Flesh. Directed by Gone with the Wind's Victor Fleming, the now-lost melodrama — Madame X meets Stella Dallas in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Review: The Phantom of the Opera (Blu-ray)

  • DailyDead
In 1925, Universal released what would become one of the most influential and important movies ever made. Even today it stands as a singular achievement in film that still impresses some eighty years on.

From Lon Chaney’s outstanding makeup to the beautiful sets and costumes, it is a breathtakingly lavish film that entertains as much as it educates. The film cannot be overstated in its historical importance, as it was the first of the Universal Monsters to be born.

Without Chaney and his amazing creation, we would arguably never have seen Lugosi’s Dracula or Karloff’s Monster and so on. One could point to this film and say it was the birth of the horror film, as we know it today. Sure, Nosferatu had come before, as had The Golem, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and of course Edison’s Frankenstein. However, The Phantom of the Opera was the
See full article at DailyDead »

Claire Bloom, Julie Harris, Mary Philbin, Jane Wyman: Top Ten Scream Queens

Claire Bloom, Julie Harris, The Haunting The Movies’ Top Ten Scream Queens 10 – Mary Philbin, The Phantom of the Opera (1925). Okay, so this is a silent film; in other words, Universal star Mary Philbin's screaming was all in my head. But it worked. Lon Chaney at his most grotesque had the title role; Norman Kerry was Philbin's dashing leading man. Rupert Julian directed. 9 – Patricia Owens, The Fly (1958). Wouldn't you also scream if you saw a fly named Andre — who happens to be your husband, no less — coming straight at you? David Hedison plays the unlucky Andre, a scientist who exchanges his head with that of a buzzing fly. Kurt Neumann directed the 1958 The Fly, which, though less pretentious, I find more disturbing than the 1986 David Cronenberg remake starring Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis. 8 – Denise Cheshire, Jaws (1975). Few people know the name of the soon-to-be shark-breakfast swimming woman in Steven Spielberg's Jaws,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-Ray Review: The Phantom of the Opera

  • ShockYa
Blu-Ray Review: The Phantom of the Opera
Title: The Phantom of the Opera Directed by: Rupert Julian Starring: Lon Chaney, Mary Philbin and Norman Kerry Running time: 78-114 minutes, Unrated Image Entertainment has released the original 1925 version and two 1929 re-release versions of Lon Chaney’s most memorable performance in The Phantom of the Opera on Blu-ray. The story of Erik, the disfigured “Phantom” that lives underneath the Paris Opera house and whom has a fixation on the beautiful and talented new opera singer Christine. The 1925 version is the original 6 millimeter with a piano score by Frederick Hodges. This version is longer than the 1929 reissues, and contains a lackluster happy ending. There were two...
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Lon Chaney Movie Schedule: The Phantom Of The Opera, Tell It To The Marines, Mr. Wu

Lon Chaney on TCM: He Who Gets Slapped, The Unknown, Mr. Wu Get ready for more extreme perversity in West of Zanzibar (1928), as Chaney abuses both Warner Baxter and Mary Nolan, while the great-looking Mr. Wu (1927) offers Chaney as a Chinese creep about to destroy the life of lovely Renée Adorée — one of the best and prettiest actresses of the 1920s. Adorée — who was just as effective in her few early talkies — died of tuberculosis in 1933. Also worth mentioning, the great John Arnold was Mr. Wu's cinematographer. I'm no fan of Laugh, Clown, Laugh (1928), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923), or The Phantom of the Opera (1925), but Chaney's work in them — especially in Hunchback — is quite remarkable. I mean, his performances aren't necessarily great, but they're certainly unforgettable. Chaney's leading ladies — all of whom are in love with younger, better-looking men — are Loretta Young (Laugh, Clown, Laugh), Patsy Ruth Miller
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Lon Chaney on TCM: He Who Gets Slapped, The Unknown, The Unholy Three

Lon Chaney, He Who Gets Slapped Lon Chaney is one of the most fascinating movie stars in film history. Throughout the 1920s, Chaney was one the biggest box-office draws the world over despite what could kindly be described as an unhandsome face — one that was often disguised by heavy layers of makeup to make him look ancient, deformed, Chinese, female, etc. His roles usually fell into two categories: total fiends, or fiends and semi-fiends in love/lust with or protective of some pretty young thing or other. On Monday, August 15, Turner Classic Movies will be showing 15 Lon Chaney movies, in addition to the reconstructed — by way of stills — London After Midnight (1927), perhaps the most talked about lost film ever. TCM will also present the premiere of the 1922 version of Oliver Twist, directed by future Oscar winner Frank Lloyd (Cavalcade, Mutiny on the Bounty), and starring Chaney as Fagin, The Kid's Jackie Coogan as Oliver,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movies... For Free! The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

Showcasing classic movies that have fallen out of copyright and are available freely from the public domain...

The Phantom of the Opera, 1925

Directed by Rupert Julian

Starring Lon Chaney, Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry, John St Polis, Arthur Edmund Carewe, Gibson Gowland and Snitz Edwards

After the success of their first foray into horror with 1923's The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Universal Studios reteamed with star Lon Chaney to bring Gaston Leroux's classic novel The Phantom of the Opera to life for their follow-up release. Designing and applying his own make-up to spectacular effect, Chaney delivers an iconic performance as the Phantom, who falls for a young singer (Mary Philbin) and terrorises the Paris Opera House in an effort to make her a star.

The lavish production saw the construction of a scale replica of the Palais Garnier (a set which remains standing to this day on Stage 28 of the Universal lot,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'The Unknown' with Live Score by the Invincible Czars

Date/Time:  Sunday, February 28, 2010 - 7:00pm - 9:30pm Location:  Alamo Drafthouse -- Ritz More info:  Visit external web page.

Local band The Invincible Czars will present their live score to Tod Browning's (Freaks, Dracula) silent film The Unknown, starring Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford, on Sunday night at Alamo Ritz. From the press release:

"What can you do with your feet? In Tod Browning's 1927 silent film The UnknownLon Chaney plays Alonzo, an armless sharpshooter and knife thrower in a Spanish gypsy circus. Alonzo smokes cigarettes, shoots a rifle, plays guitar, and throws knives with his feet, an effect Chaney produced with the help of a real-life armless double (Paul Desmuke). Alonzo's lovely assistant Nanon (Joan Crawford) is the object of his secret affection, but he is not without competition -- circus strong man Malabar (Norman Kerry) is also in love with Nanon, but it seems
See full article at Slackerwood »

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