News

Jools Holland webchat – your questions answered on punk, Amy Winehouse and his favourite rapper

The bandleader and television presenter has tickled ivories with the biggest names in music. He told us which musician he’s most in awe of, what late legend he’d like to spend eternity with and his peculiar fear of dying

1.05pm GMT

Thank you so much for joining me and taking the time to think up your eloquent questions. I hope you found my answers satisfactory. I have the honour to remain your humble and obedient servant. I'm sorry there wasn't time to answer them all.

1.04pm GMT

25aubrey asks:

Of all the people you’ve sat alongside tickling the ivories with, who were you most in awe of?

I think many of us will be in awe of the people who we have idolised since our childhood. I remember listening to Gladys Knight when I was a teenager and going to see her at the Lewisham Odeon. So
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Further Beyond review – cinematic essay on loss and exile is essential viewing

Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy’s intellectually stimulating movie – part essay, documentary and quirky drama – is in a class of its own

Following on from their superb but sadly little-seen dramatic features, Helen and Mister John, Irish co-directors Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy take their unique approach to cinema to the next level with Further Beyond. An aptly titled work in every sense, this sui generis piece is by turns an essay film in the tradition of Chris Marker (San Soleil) and Patrick Keiller (London), a documentary, and a quirky drama about loss and exile. There’s moving footage of Lawlor’s late mother whose life is sketched here, riffs on ideas about photography and representation found in Susan Sontag and Walter Benjamin, and a series of cinematic “notes” or tests towards a biopic about the 18th-century Irish adventurer Ambrose O’Higgins (played by Jose Miguel Jimenez) that Lawlor and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Landscape Cinema Starter Kit

  • MUBI
I’ve been making 16mm durational urban landscape voiceover films, slowly but surely, since the late ‘90s. My short film Blue Diary premiered at the Berlinale in 1998. My two features, The Joy of Life (2005) and The Royal Road (2015) both premiered in the prestigious New Frontiers section at the Sundance Film Festival and have been as wildly successful as experimental films can be. Which is to say, they remain fairly obscure. My small but enthusiastic fan-base frequently asks me for recommendations of films that are similar to my own in terms of incorporating durational landscapes and voiceover and a meditative pace. While it is certainly one of the smallest subgenres in the realm of filmmaking, here are a handful of excellent landscape cinema examples by the practitioners I know best. I confess that my expertise here is limited and hope that the learned Mubi community will chime in with additions in the comments field below.
See full article at MUBI »

DVD Review – Innocence of Memories (2015)

Innocence of Memories, 2015.

Directed by Grant Gee.

Starring Pandora Colin and Mehmet Ergen.

Synopsis:

Ayla narrators the story of Pamuk’s novel The Museum of Innocence in fresh vivid detail, bringing the landscape of Istanbul during the 70’s to life.

Based on the museum and novel that won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2006, Grant Gee implants Orham Pamuk’s fictitious masterpiece further into our reality, viewing Kemal’s love story through the eyes of another character that perceives Kemal’s desire for Fusan through less innocent eyes. British based documentary veteran Grant Gee unsurprisingly takes on the difficult task of adapting Orham Pamuk’s novel into a cinematic essay after directing his last documentary, Patience (After Sebald.) In the same way Patience (After Sebald) looks at Sebald’s book The Rings of Saturn as a discursive text seeks to reform the conception of memory as territory that exists on
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Mark Cousins and Christopher Doyle Explore Northern Ireland In Trailer for ‘I Am Belfast’

It’s one of the oldest rules in the book, or at least the most resilient since the early ’90s: if Christopher Doyle was involved in a film, said film will look beautiful at every moment. Whether or not Mark Cousins‘ newest documentary, I Am Belfast, stands out for any other reason remains to be seen, but the first trailer is nevertheless a solid showcase for the Australian-Chinese cinematographer’s skill for clarity, depth, shape, and light. Considering the experiential angle being aimed for, that’s as decent a start as any.

Described in every known listing as “a city symphony,” it finds Belfast’s unique properties through aesthetic appreciation and a bit of fidgeting with concepts of what does and doesn’t “fit” within documentary cinema. That’s all well and good as is, and if the picture does, as early reviews have suggested, prove the first to fully
See full article at The Film Stage »

Innocence of Memories review - Orhan Pamuk's Istanbul rendered strange and beautiful

British film-maker Grant Gee has got together with Turkey’s Nobel prize-winning novelist, and the result is a mesmerising, original meditation on love and the city

Having cut his teeth on music videos (and then graduated to the cerebral Joy Division documentary, on which he collaborated with Jon Savage), Grant Gee has reinvented himself as a formidable force in the microgenre of literary travelogues, a space hitherto largely occupied by Patrick Keiller, Andrew Kötting and Iain Sinclair. Gee headed for Suffolk for Patience (After Sebald), a reconstruction and reinvestigation of Wg Sebald’s Rings of Saturn; now he has cast his net much further afield, to Istanbul, and a creative meeting of mind’s with Turkey’s Nobel-prize-winning novelist Orhan Pamuk.

As with his Sebald film, Gee has here carefully assembled a collage of textual fragments, painterly visuals and mysterious voiceovers. The major difference of course, is that Pamuk is
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘The Visit’

What if an alien invasion really happened? Danish essay documentarian Michael Madsen (“Into Eternity”) answers that question with this “simulation,” in which real-life experts imagine their responses to a visit from another world. Filled with sleek and often surreal imagery, “The Visit” is served at a cool temperature; it fluctuates from fascinating to banal depending on the logistics under discussion. A feat of speculation that amounts more to a curiosity than a major sci-fi movie, it is likely to engross anyone intrigued by the topic while remaining in the outer orbit of a conventional theatrical release.

Billed as “an alien encounter by Michael Madsen” (complete with pretentious signature in the opening credits), “The Visit” begins — in a showman’s touch — with a thank-you from the producers “to the experts and scientists who agreed to participate in this simulation.” The conceit is that “you,” the viewer, occupy the role of the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

In a Year of 26 Festivals

  • MUBI
Something of his sad freedom

As he rode the tumbril

Should come to me, driving,

Saying the names

Tollund, Grauballe, Nebelgard,

Watching the pointing hands

Of country people,

Not knowing their tongue.

Out here in Jutland

In the old man-killing parishes

I will feel lost,

Unhappy and at home.

Seamus Heaney, The Tollund Man

It ended, like all journeys do, in Solitude, a long way from any cinema. Solitude—or rather Zolitūde, in Latvian—is a suburb of Riga, four miles as the crow flies from the fancy Scandi-Gothic-Art Nouveau city centre; six miles on foot if the pedestrian avoids diversions. But by the time I reached Solitude on that cold December Saturday afternoon, however, my inadvertent divagations must have pushed the total to the ten-mile mark. I'd looked at maps prior to departing from my hotel, of course but deliberately didn't bring one along (not a fan); I don't
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | desistfilm 007, von Trier, Resnais

The new issue of the bilingual film quarterly desistfilm features interviews with Peter von Bagh and Jeanne Liotta and articles on Vertical Cinema, Patrick Keiller, Paul Morrissey's Mixed Blood (1985) and George Miller's Mad Max (1979). Also in today's roundup of news and views: James Sibley Watson's Tomatos Another Day (1930), a sober Lars von Trier, David Thomson on Alain Resnais's Hiroshima mon amour (1959), Christoph Huber on John Ford's The Searchers (1956), early rounds of best-of-2014 films and books lists and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Ben Gibson Goes to Australia

Ben Gibson, the departing Director of the London Film School, has been appointed to a new senior role at Aftrs, the Australian Film Television & Radio School, as Director, Degree Programs. He will start work in Sydney in September.

Gibson will play a key leadership role in ensuring the successful delivery and development of a new three-year Aftrs Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree and Aftrs Screen and Screen Business Masters degrees, which are being restructured and relaunched for 2015.

Ben is eminently qualified for this pivotal new role at Aftrs, and I’m thrilled that he could be persuaded to bring his considerable skills, experience and academic rigor to Australia. His 14 years as Director of the very successful London Film School are notable for his work in building up the school’s reputation in the UK and abroad and expanding and accrediting its prestigious postgraduate degrees. Ben has also been a very successful and original independent producer and production executive, and has previously worked in distribution and exhibition, so he comes with a deep knowledge of the international screen industry at all levels,” said Sandra Levy, CEO of the Aftrs.

Prior to joining the London Film School in 2001, Gibson worked as a film distributor and independent producer, and as Head of Production at the British Film Institute from 1988 to 1998. His production and executive production credits include Terence Davies' " The Long Day Closes," Derek Jarman's "Wittgenstein," John Maybury's "Love is the Devil," Carine Adler's "Under the Skin"and Jasmin Dizdar's "Beautiful People," as well as 20 other low budget features and many shorts by UK directors including Patrick Keiller, Gurinder Chadha, Lynne Ramsay, Richard Kwietniowski and Andrew Kotting. As a partner in distributors The Other Cinema/Metro Pictures he acquired and promoted films by Pedro Almodovar, Chris Marker, Chantal Akerman and Jean-Luc Godard as well as opening the West End’s Metro Cinema in 1986. He has also been a theater director, a repertory film programmer and a film critic and journalist. He leaves Lfs at the end of July.

Ben Gibson said: “I am thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to Sandra Levy’s vision of Aftrs as a complete screen school -- and to get the chance to work in the Australian film industry, one I’ve hugely admired and followed -- so far from a great distance. Aftrs offers a special combination of good things: self-confidence, an extraordinary heritage, great creative ambition, exceptional resources, a wide educational scope and a central mission in a dynamic and productive screen industry. It’s rightly considered to be one of the great film schools of the world. I can’t wait to join the team and get started there.”

Gibson’s final year at Lfs has been attended by great creative success. The school won 35 festival prizes and mentions in 2013-14, including a BAFTA nomination. Ms Levy pointed out that this year’s Palme d'Or for Best Short Film at the Cannes Film Festival was won by Leidi, the Lfs graduation film of Simón Mesa Soto. Also at Cannes, amongst seven graduates featured in the 2014 selection, "The Salt of the Earth," co-directed by Lfs graduate Juliano Ribeiro Salgado with Wim Wenders, was awarded the Un Certain Regard’s Special Jury Prize.

Director Mike Leigh, Chair of Governors at the London Film School, in announcing Ben’s departure earlier this year, said: “Ben Gibson has led Lfs from strength to strength over his fourteen years of outstanding service, and we will be sad to see him go.”

Aftrs is Australia’s national screen arts and broadcasting school and has been named as one of the Top 20 film schools in the world by industry journal, The Hollywood Reporter. As an elite specialist institution, Aftrs provides excellence in education through its practice based model, and aspires to deliver a dynamic educational offering that prepares the most talented and creative students – novice, experienced, fully fledged professional specialists – to be platform agnostic, creative and resilient in an industry subject to constant changes in knowledge and technology. The new BA Screen is a 3-year program offering a strong base in the understanding of story and screen history alongside a comprehensive introduction to the skills of screen production.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Lfs's Ben Gibson to join Aftrs

  • ScreenDaily
Outgoing director of the London Film School to join Australian Film School.

Ben Gibson, the departing director of the London Film School, has been appointed to a new senior role at Aftrs, the Australian Film Television & Radio School, as director, degree programs. He will start work in Sydney in September.

Gibson will play a key leadership role in ensuring the successful delivery and development of a new three-year Aftrs Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree and Aftrs Screen and Screen Business Masters degrees, which are being restructured and relaunched for 2015.

Prior to joining the Lfs in 2001, Gibson worked as a film distributor and independent producer, and as head of production at the British Film Institute (BFI) from 1988 to 1998.

His production and executive production credits include Terence DaviesThe Long Day Closes, Derek Jarman’s Wittgenstein, John Maybury’s Love is the Devil, Carine Adler’s Under the Skin and Jasmin Dizdar’s Beautiful People, as well as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Between the Conceivable and the Actual: Patrick Keiller's "The View From the Train"

  • MUBI
For those readers of The View From the Train , the new book of writings by Patrick Keiller, already familiar with the author’s films, it will come as little surprise to discover many of the essays herein are playfully dense. As evinced by Keiller’s Robinson Trilogy (1994-2010), the British architect, writer and filmmaker is something of a specialist when it comes to the digestible and often amusing presentation and juxtaposition of historical facts, industrial statistics, literary references and all those other curious nuggets that comprise a cultural landscape.

As Keiller noted in typically throwaway—if far from insincere—fashion during a talk at London’s Tate Britain in May 2012, “everything is connected.” And although how one thing relates to another is not always immediately evident, Britain’s most consistently cogent film-essayist subscribes to the notion that the way in which we merely look at things can and often does
See full article at MUBI »

Bath, Nordic, Assembly: film festival previews

Bath Film Festival | Nordic Film Festival | Assemble: A Survey Of Recent Artists' Film And Video In Britain 2008-2013 | Utopia

Bath Film Festival

As well as funding this festival, IMDb (the world's biggest movie site) is sponsoring some new awards, all of which hopefully means punters get a great selection of films. Sneak previews include Ralph Fiennes's Dickens movie The Invisible Woman, Robert Redford's All Is Lost and Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom. Plus a striking pair of religious screenings: The Last Temptation Of Christ in Wells Cathedral, and The Passion Of Joan Of Arc in Bath Abbey, with a live score by Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp).

Various venues, Mon to 8 Dec

Nordic Film Festival, London, Edinburgh & Glasgow

Our Scandinavian neighbours are probably scratching their heads at our seemingly never-ending obsession with their TV detective shows. Why aren't we as fascinated with their movies as well?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Urban Wandering: Film and the London Landscape

Barbican, London

A season of films about London reveals how fog, rain and gloom of all kinds add to the mystique of the capital

I've been told that London's reputation for fog is not only due to the fact that it used to be foggy. It was also because cash-strapped postwar film-makers found it convenient to shroud their scenes in mist because they wouldn't have to build so much of the set – just one or two house fronts instead of a street. If this story is an urban myth, no matter, as it tells a truth about London on film. The city's greatest gift to the movie camera is its atmospherics, its fog, rain and darkness.

In ordinary daylight it is obstinately factual. If cinema likes to make cities into dream versions of themselves, London doesn't join in. The brick terraces, the railings, pavements, bollards and postboxes remain themselves. They
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Vagrancy and drift: the rise of the roaming essay film

For years the essay film has been a neglected form, but now its unorthodox approach to constructing reality is winning over a younger, tech-savvy crowd

For a brief, almost unreal couple of hours last July, in amid the kittens and One Direction-mania trending on Twitter, there appeared a very surprising name – that of semi-reclusive French film-maker Chris Marker, whose innovative short feature La Jetée (1962) was remade in 1995 as Twelve Monkeys by Terry Gilliam. A few months earlier, art journal e-flux staged The Desperate Edge of Now, a retrospective of Adam Curtis's TV films, to large audiences on New York's Lower East Side. The previous summer, Handsworth Songs (1986), an experimental feature by the Black Audio Film Collective Salman Rushdie had once attacked as obscurantist and politically irrelevant, attracted a huge crowd at Tate Modern when it was screened shortly after the London riots.

Marker, Curtis, Black Audio: all have
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Vagrancy and drift: the rise of the roaming essay film

For years the essay film has been a neglected form, but now its unorthodox approach to constructing reality is winning over a younger, tech-savvy crowd

For a brief, almost unreal couple of hours last July, in amid the kittens and One Direction-mania trending on Twitter, there appeared a very surprising name – that of semi-reclusive French film-maker Chris Marker, whose innovative short feature La Jetée (1962) was remade in 1995 as Twelve Monkeys by Terry Gilliam. A few months earlier, art journal e-flux staged The Desperate Edge of Now, a retrospective of Adam Curtis's TV films, to large audiences on New York's Lower East Side. The previous summer, Handsworth Songs (1986), an experimental feature by the Black Audio Film Collective Salman Rushdie had once attacked as obscurantist and politically irrelevant, attracted a huge crowd at Tate Modern when it was screened shortly after the London riots.

Marker, Curtis, Black Audio: all have
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Iain Sinclair: 70x70 – an autobiographical journey in film

The writer and king of London psychogeography is curating a season of 70 classic and unusual films throughout his 70th birthday year, presented in cinemas and quirky venues across the capital. Here he explains the project's genesis

Approaching a birthday I had no particular desire to record or commemorate, I was seduced by an enticing offer: the opportunity to nominate 70 films, one for each year survived. The man floating this folly across the table of the Little Georgia restaurant on Hackney's Goldsmith's Row was Paul Smith, underground impresario and secret magus of King Mob, Blast First, Disobey, and other shortlived but potent cultural manifestations. We had some previous, through a series of spoken-word CDs involving Ken Kesey, Charles Bukowski, the Black Panthers, Stewart Home. The CDs existed and I had copies to prove it, but they never really made the transit from warehouse to retail counter. I had performed, under Paul's promotion,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Karl Hyde's The Outer Edges: watch the world exclusive trailer

Underworld's Karl Hyde has made a feature-length documentary about his travels through Essex – here's the first glimpse of the film's trailer

Here's something you don't see every day: Karl Hyde, he of shouty techno act Underworld, has gone off and made a rather moving, artful documentary essay about the Essex borderlands, following the route of the river Roding down to the docks on the Thames estuary. Naturally, the film developed from a record project: Hyde has a solo album, Edgeland, due out next month.

Hyde has got together with director Kieran Evans, who is best known as the co-director of another music-inspired documentary, the Saint-Etienne-scored Finisterre from 2002. (Evans hus just completed his fiction-feature debut, Kelly+ Victor, due out later this year.) They have taken their cue very much from the urban travelogue school of Patrick Keiller and his Robinson films; The Outer Edges is a finely balanced mix of interview,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Looking back at BBC Two's Neverwhere

Feature Michael Leader 19 Mar 2013 - 07:00

Michael revisits the 1996 incarnation of Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere, a magical BBC series that was ahead of its time...

Spoiler warning: While this article is about a 17-year old TV programme, it inevitably discusses plot points that are also present in the currently-broadcasting radio drama remake.

“Let me tell you a story. No, wait, one’s not enough. I’ll begin again...”

So reads the back-cover blurb of Neil Gaiman’s 2006 short story anthology Fragile Things, but it’s as apt a beginning as any for an expedition back through the knotted overgrowths of time to the author’s 1996 foray into television: the six-part miniseries Neverwhere.

Now, let’s get this out of the way first: there is no single, true ‘Neverwhere’. Like its signature setting, a semi-mythological, hidden version of London that exists below the streets of Britain’s capital, Neverwhere is a
See full article at Den of Geek »

Essex: the only way is up

It's been called the 'dustbin of London' and the 'armpit of the world' – but there are efforts afoot, on TV and in the country's art galleries, to redeem Essex's reputation

We need to talk about Essex. Surely no county has been so systematically defined and reduced. Simon Heffer's now-infamous Daily Telegraph editorial published in 1990 named the vomiting Thatcherites he encountered at Liverpool Street station as examples of "Essex Man". At around the same time, Chigwell provided the setting for the upwardly mobile prison widows in Birds of a Feather. More recently, of course, there has been Buckhurst Hill and Brentwood's "structured reality" pantomime, The Only Way is Essex. And while Channel 4's Educating Essex, filmed in Harlow, was funny and sensitive, its title seemed to imply that to teach an Essex kid anything was a novel idea.

The fact that Essex is maligned is hardly news. "It has
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites