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2017 | 2016 | 2013 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

3 items from 2017


Fantasia Review: ‘Sequence Break’ is Cronenberg Without the Clarity

3 August 2017 3:46 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Introversion and high anxiety are real and can be triggered by the tiniest of things or the lack thereof. Oz (Chase Williamson) has struggled with both his entire life, that insecurity in social situations driving him towards the world of videogames. The joy of solitude playing them and being good at them brought him into a society of like-minded individuals and ultimately a career as mechanic to dinosaurs of derelict arcades past. Was he happy? Sure. Things could always be better, but isn’t that true for everyone? Routine might propel his actions — sleep, work, beer, and repeat — but it’s that type of monotony that keeps him safe. To take a chance on more would risk his falling apart completely. Unfortunately for him, change eventually comes for us all.

Graham Skipper’s Sequence Break takes us into Oz’s mind when the inevitable occurs. His world is turned upside »

- Jared Mobarak

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Sequence Break Review [Fantasia 2017]

1 August 2017 8:43 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Graham Skipper’s Sequence Break is a digital rabbit hole; an abyss of frothy goop slathered atop rubberized effects. Its very title foreshadows existential conflict, while an arcade kaleidoscope projects Skipper’s binary obsessions. Ideas emerge from Cronenbergian pools of coated wiring, heavily reminiscent of Videodrome visuals and paranoid shades of eXistenZ. Sci-fi psychedelics zap homemade Asteroid designs only to mask dimensional rifts that borrow from Under The Skin‘s vast nothingness. How do you break the “sequence” of life? Answers tend to vary, with Skipper’s latest being a ponderous retro purgatory worth wallowing in.

Chase Williamson stars as Oz (short for Osgood), a shy arcade tinkerer who brings busted-up cabinets back from the virtual dead – but not for much longer. Jerry (Lyle Kanouse) has to close shop, disrupting Oz’s safe engineering bubble. That’s when he meets Tess (Fabianne Therese), a “nerdy” girl who shows immediate romantic interest. »

- Matt Donato

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Fantasia 2017: ‘Sequence Break’ Review

18 July 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Chase Williamson, Lyle Kanouse, Fabianne Therese, Audrey Wasilewski, Johnny Dinan | Written and Directed by Graham Skipper

Oz (Williamson) is an antisocial loner who only finds solace in his love for ’80s arcade games, refurbishing and restoring them to their former glory. That is, until he meets Tess (Therese). The two quickly become romantically entwined, but their budding romance is slowly threatened by a mysterious game that seems to be drawing the two deeper and deeper into its void of slime and Cronenbergian horror. Amid the strange occurrences, a cryptic vagabond also appears, lurking around the arcade workshop at night. The dilapidated madman shouts about doom and destruction as the couple cling to the remnants of their normal lives. Oz soon finds himself facing off against the eight-bit portal to the cosmos, to both save himself and his newfound love.

Having already appeared in Almost Human and The Mind’s »

- Phil Wheat

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3 items from 2017


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